Ophthalmic Surgery, Lasers and Imaging Retina

EDITORIAL 

OPHTHALMIC SURGERY: Moves Onward and Upward

George W Weinstein, MD

Abstract

Ophthalmic Surgery was first published in 1970. In his inaugural editorial, the first editor said, "Its primary thesis is that the art and science of surgery are worthwhile and unto themselves." In that editorial, mention was made of the fact that techniques have changed rapidly, giving as an example the fact that intracapsular cataract surgery had subplanted extracapsular extraction. With great prescience, the editor concluded by saying, "We expect to serve as a forum for the evaluation of new and even controversial procedures (or the resurrection of the old)."

The present editorship of Ophthalmic Surgery dates from 1 971 . Papers from issues of that year dealt with the histopathology of cystoid macular edema, the use of 10-0 nylon suture material for keratoplasty, and techniques for extracapsular cataract extraction in patients undergoing corneal transplantation.

Subsequent years have seen original reports on these pages of procedures such as intraocular lens implantation, phakoemulsification, trabeculectomy, argon laser iridotomyand trabeculoplasty, YAG laser capsulotomy, pars plana vitrectomy, adjustable sutures for strabismus surgery, and orbital microsurgery. This has been an exciting period for all of us who have worked to produce a journal on eye surgery.

Not all of the events of the past eleven years have represented improvements in our profession. We have seen the passing of giants, Duke Elder, Reese, and Walsh, and have witnessed the emergence of buccaneer eye surgeons, and optometrists who covet the practice of ophthalmic medicine and surgery. Somehow, at least to date, ophthalmology has managed to meet its adversities, survive, and grow.

The editorship of this journal now passes to a superb and capable individual, George L. Spaeth, M.D. Dr. Spaeth has served with the editorial board of this journal since 1971, and has made numerous important contributions to eye surgery during this time. His book. Ophthalmic Surgery, has become widely accepted as a definitive and current text on this subject.

A useful journal depends on a complex interrelationship between publisher, editor, and editorial board, authors, staff, and readers. The readers of this journal have been a major factor in its vitality over these past eleven years. The coming years will continue to require much committment from each of us to the art and science of ophthalmic surgery.…

Ophthalmic Surgery was first published in 1970. In his inaugural editorial, the first editor said, "Its primary thesis is that the art and science of surgery are worthwhile and unto themselves." In that editorial, mention was made of the fact that techniques have changed rapidly, giving as an example the fact that intracapsular cataract surgery had subplanted extracapsular extraction. With great prescience, the editor concluded by saying, "We expect to serve as a forum for the evaluation of new and even controversial procedures (or the resurrection of the old)."

The present editorship of Ophthalmic Surgery dates from 1 971 . Papers from issues of that year dealt with the histopathology of cystoid macular edema, the use of 10-0 nylon suture material for keratoplasty, and techniques for extracapsular cataract extraction in patients undergoing corneal transplantation.

Subsequent years have seen original reports on these pages of procedures such as intraocular lens implantation, phakoemulsification, trabeculectomy, argon laser iridotomyand trabeculoplasty, YAG laser capsulotomy, pars plana vitrectomy, adjustable sutures for strabismus surgery, and orbital microsurgery. This has been an exciting period for all of us who have worked to produce a journal on eye surgery.

Not all of the events of the past eleven years have represented improvements in our profession. We have seen the passing of giants, Duke Elder, Reese, and Walsh, and have witnessed the emergence of buccaneer eye surgeons, and optometrists who covet the practice of ophthalmic medicine and surgery. Somehow, at least to date, ophthalmology has managed to meet its adversities, survive, and grow.

The editorship of this journal now passes to a superb and capable individual, George L. Spaeth, M.D. Dr. Spaeth has served with the editorial board of this journal since 1971, and has made numerous important contributions to eye surgery during this time. His book. Ophthalmic Surgery, has become widely accepted as a definitive and current text on this subject.

A useful journal depends on a complex interrelationship between publisher, editor, and editorial board, authors, staff, and readers. The readers of this journal have been a major factor in its vitality over these past eleven years. The coming years will continue to require much committment from each of us to the art and science of ophthalmic surgery.

10.3928/1542-8877-19821201-03

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