Journal of Refractive Surgery

Original Article Supplemental Data

A Coincident Thinning Index for Keratoconus Identification Using OCT Pachymetry and Epithelial Thickness Maps

Elias Pavlatos, PhD; Shihao Chen, MD; Yuli Yang, MD, PhD; Qinmei Wang, MD; David Huang, MD, PhD; Yan Li, PhD

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To develop a coincident thinning (CTN) index to differentiate between keratoconic and healthy corneas using optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurements of pachymetry and epithelial thickness.

METHODS:

Pattern deviation maps of pachymetry and epithelial thickness were generated using Fourier-domain OCT images of the cornea. The co-localized thinning of the two maps was quantified using a novel CTN index, which was calculated from Gaussian fits of the regions of maximum relative thinning. The CTN index was validated using k-fold cross-validation, and its classification performance was compared to minimum pachymetry and maximum keratometry.

RESULTS:

A total of 82 normal eyes and 133 eyes within three groups of keratoconus severity were evaluated. The pattern deviation maps for the keratoconic eyes showed relative thinning that was larger in magnitude and more strongly correlated with the Gaussian function compared to normal eyes (all P < .01). The distance between the pachymetric and epithelial maximum relative thinning locations was significantly smaller for the keratoconic eyes than for the normal eyes (all P < .02). The CTN index was significantly larger for all three keratoconus groups compared to normal eyes (all P < .0001). The CTN index demonstrated a sensitivity of 100% in detecting manifest keratoconus, 100% for subclinical keratoconus, and 56% for forme fruste keratoconus. The overall classification accuracy was better for the CTN index (93%) than for minimum pachymetry (86%) and maximum keratometry (86%).

CONCLUSIONS:

The CTN index is a highly sensitive measure of coincident pachymetric and epithelial thinning. It provides valuable information for detecting and monitoring early to moderate keratoconus.

[J Refract Surg. 2020;36(11):757–765.]

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To develop a coincident thinning (CTN) index to differentiate between keratoconic and healthy corneas using optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurements of pachymetry and epithelial thickness.

METHODS:

Pattern deviation maps of pachymetry and epithelial thickness were generated using Fourier-domain OCT images of the cornea. The co-localized thinning of the two maps was quantified using a novel CTN index, which was calculated from Gaussian fits of the regions of maximum relative thinning. The CTN index was validated using k-fold cross-validation, and its classification performance was compared to minimum pachymetry and maximum keratometry.

RESULTS:

A total of 82 normal eyes and 133 eyes within three groups of keratoconus severity were evaluated. The pattern deviation maps for the keratoconic eyes showed relative thinning that was larger in magnitude and more strongly correlated with the Gaussian function compared to normal eyes (all P < .01). The distance between the pachymetric and epithelial maximum relative thinning locations was significantly smaller for the keratoconic eyes than for the normal eyes (all P < .02). The CTN index was significantly larger for all three keratoconus groups compared to normal eyes (all P < .0001). The CTN index demonstrated a sensitivity of 100% in detecting manifest keratoconus, 100% for subclinical keratoconus, and 56% for forme fruste keratoconus. The overall classification accuracy was better for the CTN index (93%) than for minimum pachymetry (86%) and maximum keratometry (86%).

CONCLUSIONS:

The CTN index is a highly sensitive measure of coincident pachymetric and epithelial thinning. It provides valuable information for detecting and monitoring early to moderate keratoconus.

[J Refract Surg. 2020;36(11):757–765.]

Keratoconus is an ocular disease characterized by thinning and outward protrusion of the cornea.1 The irregular corneal shape causes distorted vision that may continue to deteriorate as the disease progresses. Corneal cross-linking (CXL) is an effective treatment that prevents keratoconus progression by strengthening stromal collagen.2 Early detection of keratoconus is important so that treatment can be instituted prior to vision loss. Early detection is also important in screening candidates for refractive surgery, because undiagnosed keratoconus is the leading risk factor for ectasia after refractive surgery.3,4 Suspicious topographic patterns have been detected in 4.3% of patients evaluated as candidates for laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK),5 although early forms of the disease may be more common and go unrecognized during routine examinations.6,7

Keratoconus-related decreases in visual acuity and slit-lamp findings typically do not present until the manifest stage of the disease. For early detection to be possible, clinicians must possess more sensitive diagnostic tools. Corneal topography is the current clinical standard for keratoconus detection; however, its sensitivity and specificity are still limited. One reason is that thinning of the epithelium in the region of the cone can mask focal anterior steepening of the underlying stroma.8 Furthermore, it can be difficult to distinguish keratoconus from other sources of focal anterior steepening. Epithelial changes (contact lens–related warpage and epithelial basement membrane dystrophy) and stromal changes (steep central island due to uneven ablation and decentered hyperopic LASIK) can mimic the topographic appearance of ectasia.9,10

Attempts to overcome the limitations of measuring only the anterior corneal surface have been made by measuring corneal thickness (ie, pachymetry). Central pachymetry has low sensitivity and specificity because a keratoconic cornea can have normal central thickness and a relatively thin cornea can be normal.11 Other pachymetry-based parameters such as minimum corneal thickness, superonasal-inferotemporal asymmetry, and the Belin/Ambrósio Enhanced Ectasia Display have been shown to provide better diagnostic value.12–15 It has therefore been suggested that tomography (eg, optical coherence tomography [OCT] or Scheimpflug imaging) is the best method for diagnosing early keratoconus11 because the posterior surface and thickness of the cornea can be measured. In addition to pachymetry, OCT can map epithelial thickness,16 which exhibits characteristic changes in keratoconus.17

The premise of our study was the clinical observation that pachymetric and epithelial thinning occur at similar locations in keratoconus.10 Our goal was to develop a coincident thinning (CTN) index to quantify this co-localized thinning and evaluate its ability to detect keratoconus. Eyes with varying severities of keratoconus and normal controls were imaged, and the CTN index was compared to minimum pachymetry and maximum keratometry.

Patients and Methods

Participant Information

Participants were recruited from the Casey Eye Institute at Oregon Health & Science University (Portland, Oregon) and the Affiliated Eye Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College (Wenzhou, China). The study protocol was approved by the institutional review boards of both institutions, and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. This study adhered to the tenets of the Declaration of Helsinki and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996. Patients were evaluated for refractive error and underwent slit-lamp examination. Corneal topography maps and maximum keratometry were obtained using either the Orbscan II (Bausch & Lomb) or Pentacam (Oculus Optikgeräte GmbH). The ABCD keratoconus grading indices were recorded for eyes scanned by the Pentacam.18 Eyes with recent contact lens use (soft within 1 week or rigid gas permeable within 3 weeks) or history of ocular surgeries were excluded. Eyes with severe keratoconus with corneal scarring were excluded because they have unpredictable thickness patterns and do not pose a challenge for clinical diagnosis.

Participants were divided into normal and three keratoconus groups using the following criteria: (1) normal: normal slit-lamp examination, corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) of 20/20 or better, normal topography appearance, and KISA% index less than 100 [The KISA% index combines multiple topography parameters to quantify features associated with keratoconus19]; (2) manifest keratoconus: slit-lamp examination finding consistent with keratoconus (Vogt's striae, Fleischer's ring, Munson's sign, Rizutti's sign, and apparent focal bulging and thinning) or CDVA worse than 20/20, topographic pattern characteristic of keratoconus (asymmetric bowtie with skewed radial axis, central or inferior steep zone), and KISA% index of 100 or greater; (3) subclinical keratoconus: normal slit-lamp examination, CDVA 20/20 or better, topography characteristic of keratoconus, and KISA% index of 100 or greater; and (4) forme fruste keratoconus: better eye of a patient with asymmetric keratoconus who had a normal slit-lamp examination, CDVA 20/20 or better, normal topography, and KISA% index of less than 100; the fellow eye had either manifest or subclinical keratoconus.

OCT Imaging and Pattern Deviation Maps

OCT scans were obtained using commercial Fourier-domain OCT systems (RTVue or Avanti; Optovue, Inc) with a corneal adaptor module for imaging of the anterior eye. A Pachymetry+Cpwr radial scan pattern was used to acquire 6-mm–wide images of the cornea, centered on the pupil (Figure AA, available in the online version of this article). The scan pattern was composed of eight meridians, each with 1,024 axial lines. The pattern was repeated five times within a single scan.

(A) Optical coherence tomography (OCT) radial scan pattern used to obtain 6-mm–wide images of the cornea. (B) Representative OCT image of a cornea with segmented boundaries.

Figure A.

(A) Optical coherence tomography (OCT) radial scan pattern used to obtain 6-mm–wide images of the cornea. (B) Representative OCT image of a cornea with segmented boundaries.

The corneal OCT images were segmented and dewarped (Figure AB)20 using a custom algorithm (MATLAB; MathWorks, Inc) to generate pachymetry and epithelial thickness maps.12,16 Minimum pachymetry was recorded. OCT scans with low signal intensity or motion artifact were excluded to avoid unreliable thickness maps. Eyes with two satisfactory scans were analyzed.

The methodology for calculating pattern deviation (PD) maps was described previously.21 Briefly, PD maps display percent differences in relative thickness compared to the thickness pattern of normal eyes. Pachymetry and epithelial thickness PD maps were used to calculate the CTN index. All calculations were limited to the central 5 mm of the maps to avoid less reliable measurements at the periphery.

Keratoconic Cone Search Area and Gaussian Fitting

Pachymetric and epithelial maximum relative thinning locations were identified in the corresponding PD maps. The correlation and distance between the pachymetric and epithelial maximum relative thinning locations were evaluated for the normal and keratoconus groups. The 99% confidence region for the pachymetric maximum relative thinning locations was calculated from the eyes with manifest keratoconus (Figure B, available in the online version of this article) to characterize the keratoconic cone distribution and serve as the cone search area during Gaussian fitting.

Corneal sector map showing the locations of maximum relative thinning from pachymetry pattern deviation maps of eyes with manifest keratoconus. The search area was defined as the 99% confidence region based on a two-dimensional Gaussian distribution. Locations for left eyes were mirror-image mapped to the right eye coordinate system. CTN = coincident thinning; S = superior; T = temporal; I = inferior; N = nasal

Figure B.

Corneal sector map showing the locations of maximum relative thinning from pachymetry pattern deviation maps of eyes with manifest keratoconus. The search area was defined as the 99% confidence region based on a two-dimensional Gaussian distribution. Locations for left eyes were mirror-image mapped to the right eye coordinate system. CTN = coincident thinning; S = superior; T = temporal; I = inferior; N = nasal

Two-dimensional symmetric Gaussian waveforms were fitted to the pachymetric and epithelial PD maps to capture the cone-shaped focal thinning pattern in keratoconus. The center of the Gaussian fit was the location of maximum relative thinning within the cone search area described above. Full width at half maximum (FWHM) values from the best-fit pachymetric and epithelial Gaussian waveforms for the eyes with manifest keratoconus were used to characterize the keratoconic cone width. Using the median FWHM, a simplified Gaussian fitting approach was used to calculate the CTN index (details in Results section). Both pachymetric and epithelial PD maps were refit using the simplified approach. The correlation between the fitted Gaussian waveform and the thickness PD map, as well as the Gaussian amplitudes, were evaluated.

CTN Index

A CTN map was generated as the product of Gaussian fits of the pachymetric and epithelial PD maps (Figure C, available in the online version of this article). The CTN index was calculated as the maximum value of the CTN map (Equation 1):

CTN Index=max(Gpachy(x,y)×Gepi(x,y))
where Gpachy and Gepi are the Gaussian fits from the pachymetry and epithelial thickness PD maps, respectively. CTN index values from repeated scans were averaged to produce one value for each eye.
Gaussian fitting procedure for a representative pachymetry pattern deviation map from an eye with manifest keratoconus. (A) The location of maximum relative thinning within the search area was identified, and (B) a 4-mm diameter surrounding region was used for Gaussian fitting.

Figure C.

Gaussian fitting procedure for a representative pachymetry pattern deviation map from an eye with manifest keratoconus. (A) The location of maximum relative thinning within the search area was identified, and (B) a 4-mm diameter surrounding region was used for Gaussian fitting.

The CTN index cutoff value, used to classify eyes as “normal” or “keratoconus,” was calculated using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The eyes from all three keratoconus groups were treated as the positive cases, and one eye was randomly selected if both eyes of a patient were measured. The ROC curve was spline-interpolated, and the CTN index value corresponding to 95% specificity was selected as the cutoff. Bootstrapping was used to reduce the influence of sample selection, and the final CTN index cutoff value was the bootstrapped average. The Gaussian fits, CTN index, and CTN index cutoff value were calculated using custom MATLAB algorithms.

Statistical Analysis and Classification Performance

The chi-square test was used to verify data normality. Two-tailed t tests (normality confirmed) or Mann-Whitney U tests (normality rejected) were used to compare differences in average values between each keratoconus group and normal eyes. One eye was chosen randomly if both eyes of a participant were involved. The relationship between the pachymetric and epithelial maximum relative thinning locations was quantified using either Pearson (normality confirmed) or Spearman (normality rejected) correlations. The repeatability of the CTN index, minimum pachymetry, and maximum keratometry were evaluated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Only one topography scan per eye was obtained in this study. Therefore, the ICC for maximum keratometry was estimated using the standard deviation of measurement error from the literature.22

Repeated five-fold cross-validation (80% training, 20% test, five repetitions) was performed in MATLAB to estimate the out-of-sample performance of the CTN index, minimum pachymetry, and maximum keratometry. During cross-validation of the CTN index, a new search area and characteristic Gaussian width were calculated within each fold using the training set. Average values across the repeated cross-validations were calculated for the classification cutoff, overall accuracy, sensitivity for each keratoconus group, and area under the ROC curve (AUC).

The McNemar test was used to compare differences in sensitivity between the three parameters. A majority vote method was used to produce one set of predictions (eg, an eye found to be normal in three of five cross-validations was classified as normal). Statistical differences between ROC curves were analyzed using the DeLong test. The CTN index values computed when the eyes were in the test set were averaged across the cross-validations to obtain a single data set. These statistical comparisons were done using MedCalc (MedCalc Software).

Results

A total of 82 normal and 133 keratoconic eyes were included in this prospective cross-sectional study (Table 1). There was no significant difference in age between groups. Compared to normal, all three keratoconus groups had thinner corneas, larger steep keratometry, and larger maximum keratometry. Flat keratometry was higher for the manifest and subclinical keratoconus groups, but not the forme fruste keratoconus group. The average ABCD indices of 64 manifest, 10 subclinical, and 17 forme fruste keratoconus eyes whose topography maps were acquired using Pentacam were reported in Figure 1.

Participant Characteristics

Table 1:

Participant Characteristics

Average ABCD indices for the eyes within each keratoconus group that were scanned by the Pentacam (Oculus Optikgeräte GmbH) (manifest keratoconus = 64 eyes, subclinical keratoconus = 10 eyes, forme fruste keratoconus = 17 eyes). The D index was equal to zero for all eyes with subclinical and forme fruste keratoconus. Error bars = standard deviation.

Figure 1.

Average ABCD indices for the eyes within each keratoconus group that were scanned by the Pentacam (Oculus Optikgeräte GmbH) (manifest keratoconus = 64 eyes, subclinical keratoconus = 10 eyes, forme fruste keratoconus = 17 eyes). The D index was equal to zero for all eyes with subclinical and forme fruste keratoconus. Error bars = standard deviation.

The locations of pachymetric focal thinning were mostly clustered in the inferotemporal and inferior sectors of the cornea for eyes with manifest keratoconus (Figure B). The 99% confidence region (ie, cone search area) was centered inferotemporally (x = −0.55 mm, y = −1.35 mm) with a radius of 1.91 mm. The pachymetric and epithelial maximum relative thinning locations were significantly closer for the manifest and subclinical keratoconus groups (average distance: 0.49 to 0.63 mm) compared to normal (1.47 mm, Table 2). A strong correlation was found between these locations for the manifest and subclinical keratoconus groups (0.63 to 0.86, Table 2). These findings verified coincident thinning of pachymetry and epithelium thickness in keratoconus. Therefore, the simplified Gaussian fitting approach used the pachymetric maximum relative thinning location inside the cone search area as the Gaussian center for both pachymetric and epithelial map fitting.

Relationship Between Pachymetry and Epithelial Thickness Maximum Relative Thinning Locations

Table 2:

Relationship Between Pachymetry and Epithelial Thickness Maximum Relative Thinning Locations

Gaussian fits with flexible width yielded a median FWHM of 3.38 mm for pachymetry and 7.73 mm for epithelial thickness in manifest keratoconus. Due to large variability in the epithelial fits, the simplified Gaussian fitting approach used a fixed symmetric Gaussian width. The Gaussian width was set equal to the median FWHM for the respective map type. The fitting was performed on a 4-mm diameter region around the Gaussian center.

The pachymetric thinning patterns were strongly correlated with the Gaussian functions in keratoconus (average correlation = 0.71 to 0.92, Table 3, Figure 2). The epithelial thinning patterns correlated well with the Gaussian functions in manifest and subclinical keratoconus (0.70 to 0.73), but were less correlated in forme fruste keratoconus (0.49). Normal pachymetric and epithelial thickness PD maps correlated poorly with the Gaussian functions (0.34 to 0.42), indicating the lack of cone-shaped focal thinning patterns in normal eyes.

Characteristics of Gaussian Fits From Pachymetry and Epithelial Thickness PD Maps and the CTN Index

Table 3:

Characteristics of Gaussian Fits From Pachymetry and Epithelial Thickness PD Maps and the CTN Index

Pattern deviation, coincident thinning (CTN), and Pentacam (Oculus Optikgeräte GmbH) axial power maps for representative eyes from each group. Eyes in the keratoconus groups were generally found to have a higher amplitude and correlation from Gaussian fitting compared to normal eyes (dashed line = Gaussian fit region). Gpachy = pachymetry Gaussian fit; Gepi = epithelial thickness Gaussian fit; D = diopters; K = keratometry

Figure 2.

Pattern deviation, coincident thinning (CTN), and Pentacam (Oculus Optikgeräte GmbH) axial power maps for representative eyes from each group. Eyes in the keratoconus groups were generally found to have a higher amplitude and correlation from Gaussian fitting compared to normal eyes (dashed line = Gaussian fit region). Gpachy = pachymetry Gaussian fit; Gepi = epithelial thickness Gaussian fit; D = diopters; K = keratometry

For both pachymetry and epithelial thickness, the amplitude of the Gaussian fit was significantly larger for all three keratoconus groups compared to normal (Table 3). The larger amplitudes were compounded to produce a higher CTN index in keratoconus. The CTN index revealed the highest amount of relative thinning in eyes with manifest keratoconus (average: 11.9%), followed by subclinical keratoconus (9.3%) and forme fruste keratoconus (3.4%), compared to normal.

The ICC across all keratoconus groups was 0.95 for the CTN index and 0.97 for minimum pachymetry. The estimated ICC for maximum keratometry was 0.98. The CTN index was strongly correlated (Figure 3) with both minimum pachymetry (R = −0.80, P < .0001) and maximum keratometry (R = 0.81, P < .0001).

Coincident thinning (CTN) index plotted against (A) minimum pachymetry and (B) maximum keratometry. The 95% specificity cutoff lines are shown for each parameter. The data points in the shaded region represent eyes that were classified as keratoconic eyes by the CTN index but appear normal based on minimum pachymetry or maximum keratometry. D = diopters

Figure 3.

Coincident thinning (CTN) index plotted against (A) minimum pachymetry and (B) maximum keratometry. The 95% specificity cutoff lines are shown for each parameter. The data points in the shaded region represent eyes that were classified as keratoconic eyes by the CTN index but appear normal based on minimum pachymetry or maximum keratometry. D = diopters

The keratoconus cutoff values were 2.22% for the CTN index, 489.3 µm for minimum pachymetry, and 46.90 D for maximum keratometry. Cross-validation showed that the CTN index had statistically higher overall accuracy compared to minimum pachymetry nd maximum keratometry (P < .04, Table 4). The AUC was significantly higher for the CTN index versus both minimum pachymetry and maximum keratometry (P < .05). Small variations were observed for the Gaussian center search area (center x: ±0.03 mm, center y: ± 0.02 mm, radius: ± 0.07 mm) and the characteristic Gaussian FWHM (± 0.1 mm) during cross-validation.

Classification Accuracy of Keratoconus Diagnostic Parametersa

Table 4:

Classification Accuracy of Keratoconus Diagnostic Parameters

Discussion

In this study, a CTN index was developed to analyze co-localized thinning in pachymetry and epithelial thickness maps. The performance of the CTN index in differentiating normal and keratoconic eyes was evaluated. We verified the premises of the CTN index, showing that focal thinning for pachymetry and epithelial thickness are coincident in keratoconus, the thinning has a characteristic inferotemporal location and Gaussian shape, and the amplitude of thinning correlates well with maximum keratometry.

Corneal epithelial thickness may exhibit thinning at multiple locations, whereas pachymetry usually shows one clear thinning location. Therefore, the search area was defined using pachymetric PD maps. The search area for the location of maximum relative thinning (ie, Gaussian center) was centered inferotemporally to cover the characteristic cone locations in keratoconus.23 The cone location appeared to have a symmetric Gaussian distribution, which allowed us to use a simple circular search area. Most of this search area fell within the 6-mm diameter OCT scan. Current OCT systems offer 9-mm diameter scans that would encompass the entire search area and may further improve the diagnostic accuracy of the CTN index.

The pachymetric width of the keratoconus cone we measured was similar to previous measurements from anterior mean curvature maps (FWHM approximately 3 mm).24 The fixed width of the Gaussian function made it possible to compare the shape of the thinning pattern between groups. The Gaussian function showed excellent cross-correlation with PD maps of keratoconic eyes, validating our choice of using symmetric Gaussian functions to characterize focal thinning in keratoconus.

The calculation of the CTN index used a multiplication scheme that was influenced by both the amplitudes and locations of relative thinning in the pachymetry and epithelial thickness PD maps. The larger CTN index measured in keratoconic eyes can be explained by their larger Gaussian amplitudes (Table 3) and the closer proximity of the maximum relative thinning locations for the two maps (Table 2).

The CTN index outperformed both minimum pachymetry and maximum keratometry in distinguishing keratoconic eyes from normal eyes. The superior performance of the CTN index is likely due to the integration of epithelial thickness information. Because the epithelium is thin relative to overall corneal thickness, decreases in epithelial thickness result in larger percent changes, which could heavily influence the CTN index. Furthermore, whereas thinning of the epithelium over the cone can make it difficult to recognize keratoconus using anterior topography, the CTN index algorithm takes advantage of this characteristic pattern to enhance its diagnostic performance.

Other methods have been proposed for improving keratoconus diagnosis. Detection of early keratoconus using the elevation of the posterior corneal surface has been effective when combined with other measurements such as pachymetry.15,25–27 Other studies have reported high AUC values when distinguishing eyes with forme fruste keratoconus from normal eyes using models that combined up to 13 parameters from tomographic imaging.28,29 Importantly, these models need to be validated to determine out-of-sample performance. Machine learning methods have reported sensitivity and specificity greater than 90% on validation data sets.30–32 Changes in corneal biomechanics are suspected to precede structural changes and have drawn interest.33–36 Direct comparison to the aforementioned methods is difficult due to differences in patient populations and the criteria defining early keratoconus. In this study, we demonstrated that the CTN index was capable of identifying 56% of the forme fruste keratoconus eyes, including 4 eyes that showed no signs of keratoconus based on ABCD indexing (all indices = 0, an example is shown in Figure 2, bottom row). One eye with forme fruste keratoconus with a non-zero ABCD index (ABCD = 0010) was not detected by the CTN index.

Maximum keratometry is used as a metric for keratoconus progression. However, variation between repeated measurements can be as large as 1.00 D,22 so it is not reproducible enough to serve as an endpoint for individual patients.37–39 The CTN index showed excellent repeatability with an ICC of 0.95. The CTN index was also highly correlated with minimum pachymetry and maximum keratometry, suggesting that it could be used to characterize keratoconus severity. Thus, the CTN index may improve the ability of clinicians to monitor progression in early to moderate keratoconus.

There are several limitations of this study. First, the sample size was relatively small for the subclinical keratoconus and forme fruste keratoconus groups. This may explain why a statistically significant difference in sensitivity was not detected between the diagnostic parameters for the early keratoconus groups (except for CTN index versus maximum keratometry for the forme fruste keratoconus group, which had a large difference). Second, longitudinal measurements acquired at multiple time points are needed to verify the ability of the CTN index to detect keratoconus progression. Finally, OCT is capable of measuring both anterior and posterior corneal topography,40 and corneal topographic information can be incorporated into future models to further improve diagnostic accuracy.

We have developed an OCT-based algorithm for the detection of keratoconus that quantifies coincident thinning in pachymetry and epithelial thickness maps. A novel parameter, the CTN index, was designed as a quantitative image-derived biomarker that is specific to keratoconus. The high sensitivity of the CTN index provides evidence that it could be used to complement current clinical standards for detecting and monitoring early to moderate keratoconus.

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Participant Characteristics

Patient GroupNo. of Eyes (Patients)Age (y)Minimum Pachymetry (µm)Flat K (D)Steep K (D)Max K (D)
Normal82 (43)32.5 ± 14.1530 ± 3042.6 ± 1.443.8 ± 1.444.3 ± 1.4
Manifest keratoconus91 (65)35.6 ± 15.2439 ± 38a46.1 ± 3.8a50.1 ± 4.5a57.6 ± 6.7a
Subclinical keratoconus16 (14)37.1 ± 14.3455 ± 52a45.0 ± 4.1b48.1 ± 4.5b53.1 ± 5.0a
Forme fruste keratoconus26 (26)31.1 ± 13.5491 ± 35a43.2 ± 1.344.5 ± 1.5a46.1 ± 2.9b

Relationship Between Pachymetry and Epithelial Thickness Maximum Relative Thinning Locations

Patient GroupXepi − Xpachy (mm)Yepi − Ypachy (mm)X Location CorrelationY Location CorrelationDistance Between Pachymetric & Epithelial Maximum Relative Thinning Locations (mm)
Normal0.19 ± 1.13−0.55 ± 1.070.100.131.47 ± 0.76
Manifest keratoconus−0.14 ± 0.480.37 ± 0.47a0.63b0.72b0.63 ± 0.45a
Subclinical keratoconus−0.03 ± 0.420.29 ± 0.25c0.7b0.86b0.49 ± 0.27c
Forme fruste keratoconus0.24 ± 1.040.16 ± 0.61c0.350.45b0.98 ± 0.72c

Characteristics of Gaussian Fits From Pachymetry and Epithelial Thickness PD Maps and the CTN Index

Patient GroupGaussian Amplitude (%)Gaussian CorrelationCTN Index (%)


PachymetryEpithelial ThicknessPachymetryEpithelial Thickness
Normal−1 ± 1−3 ± 10.42 ± 0.250.34 ± 0.171.0 ± 0.8
Manifest keratoconus−10 ± 4a−21 ± 8a0.91 ± 0.07a0.70 ± 0.22a11.9 ± 3.8a
Subclinical keratoconus−7 ± 3a−18 ± 8a0.92 ± 0.06b0.73 ± 0.13a9.3 ± 2.4a
Forme fruste keratoconus−3 ± 2a−7 ± 6a0.71 ± 0.18b0.49 ± 0.22a3.4 ± 3.1a

Classification Accuracy of Keratoconus Diagnostic Parametersa

Diagnostic ParameterCutoff ValueOverall Accuracy (%)Sensitivity by Group (%)AUC

Manifest KeratoconusSubclinical KeratoconusForme Fruste Keratoconus
CTN index (%)2.22 ± 0.0293 ± 0100 ± 0100 ± 056 ± 30.970 ± 0.002
Minimum pachymetry (µm)489.3 ± 1.086 ± 0b91 ± 0b69 ± 249 ± 30.937 ± 0.003c
Maximum keratometry (D)46.9 ± 0.48 ± 2b98 ± 195 ± 328 ± 7b0.945 ± 0.002c
Authors

From The Center for Ophthalmic Optics and Lasers, Casey Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon (EP, YY, DH, YL); the School of Optometry and Ophthalmology, Affiliated Eye Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, China (SC, QW); and Southwest Eye Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China (YY).

Supported by the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (Grant Nos. R01EY028755, R01EY029023, T32EY023211, and P30EY010572); a research grant and equipment support from Optovue, Inc, Fremont, California; and unrestricted grants to Casey Eye Institute and Bascom Palmer Eye Institute from Research to Prevent Blindness, Inc, New York, New York.

Oregon Health & Science University and Drs. Huang and Li have a significant financial interest in Optovue, Inc, a company that may have a commercial interest in the results of this research and technology. The remaining authors have no financial or proprietary interest in the materials presented herein.

The authors thank Dr. Xubo Song for her consultation on the validation of the CTN index algorithm and Dr. Dongseok Choi for his assistance with statistical analyses.

AUTHOR CONTRIBUTIONS

Study concept and design (EP, DH, YL); data collection (EP, SC, YY, QW, DH, YL); analysis and interpretation of data (EP, SC, DH, YL); writing the manuscript (EP); critical revision of the manuscript (EP, SC, YY, QW, DH, YL); supervision (DH, YL)

Correspondence: Yan Li, PhD, Casey Eye Institute, 515 SW Campus Dr., Portland, OR 97239. Email: liyan@ohsu.edu

Received: January 29, 2020
Accepted: September 10, 2020

10.3928/1081597X-20200925-01

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