Journal of Refractive Surgery

Editorial 

Bahrain 2009: NIDEK Presentations During the 10th Middle East African Council of Ophthalmology International Congress

Abstract

From the Refractive Surgery and Cornea Unit, Magrabi Eye & Ear Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

The author has no proprietary interest in the materials presented herein.

Correspondence: Ayman N. Hashem, MD, FRCS, Magrabi Eye & Ear Hospital, PO Box 7344, Jeddah 21462, Saudi Arabia. Tel: 96 2636 5000; E-mail: ayman.nasr@magrabi.com.sa

This year’s supplement to the Journal of Refractive Surgery is an interesting compilation of articles comprised of actively solicited papers from authors worldwide and the 2009 NIDEK Advanced Vision Excimer Laser Platform (NAVEX) Seminar held in conjunction with the 10th Middle East African Council of Ophthalmology (MEA-CO) International Congress, which was held in Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain. The Kingdom of Bahrain was the first country in the Persian Gulf to have oil wells, which resulted in largely replacing the traditional pearl industry of this country.

In keeping with this pioneering spirit, the authors in this issue have addressed a number of topics that signify the process of change over time. For example, the traditional laser centration technique on the line of sight may not be optimal for all patients as presented by Okamoto and colleagues. Another example is the use of the OPD-Scan II/Station for the evaluation of phakic intraocular lenses (IOLs) rather than traditional aberrometers as presented by Hashem and colleagues and Hamdi.

Change also implies adaptability, a hallmark of NIDEK’s philosophy. NIDEK introduced NAVEX and over the past decade has incorporated a number of technologies to keep it a forerunner in the field. Two examples are the incorporation of one of the first active cyclotorsion error compensation modules in an excimer laser and a 1-KHz active eye tracker. With corneal topographic, aspheric, wavefront-guided, and fully prolate ablations, NIDEK remains a leader in the Middle East and worldwide for its diagnostic and therapeutic applications in vision correction. Traditionally, NIDEK has maintained a commitment to a dynamic and comprehensive education for its users by gathering surgeons worldwide to exchange ideas. This year’s meeting was no different, and practice patterns were realized to be similar regardless of region or country.

In this issue, outcomes of topography-guided treatments (customized aspheric treatment [CATz]), wavefront-guided treatments (optical path difference customized aspheric treatment [OPDCAT]), and optimized aspheric transition zone treatments (OATz) are presented. Amoozadeh and colleagues report keratocyte density after LASIK and PRK using the Confoscan 3. Waring summarizes the clinical implications of recent technological additions to the CXIII and Quest excimer lasers in the form of increased accuracy of laser spot placement with the new 1-kHz infrared eye tracker, which provides the potential for attaining perfect customized corneal treatment. El Danasoury presents his experience with CATz in retreating highly irregular corneas.

I would like to thank Rich Bains, consultant to NIDEK Co Ltd, for his professional contribution and initial edits of the original manuscripts. My sincerest appreciation to Alaa M. El Danasoury, MD, and Hamed M. Anwar, MD, for the spirit of teamwork and the support with this issue. Finally, I would especially like to thank George O. Waring III, MD, Editor-in-Chief, for inviting me to be the guest editor of this supplement.

The articles included in this supplement, editorially reviewed by myself and Dr Waring, receive “S” pagination, indicating the commercial sponsorship of the non-peer reviewed suppplement.…

From the Refractive Surgery and Cornea Unit, Magrabi Eye & Ear Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

The author has no proprietary interest in the materials presented herein.

Correspondence: Ayman N. Hashem, MD, FRCS, Magrabi Eye & Ear Hospital, PO Box 7344, Jeddah 21462, Saudi Arabia. Tel: 96 2636 5000; E-mail: ayman.nasr@magrabi.com.sa

This year’s supplement to the Journal of Refractive Surgery is an interesting compilation of articles comprised of actively solicited papers from authors worldwide and the 2009 NIDEK Advanced Vision Excimer Laser Platform (NAVEX) Seminar held in conjunction with the 10th Middle East African Council of Ophthalmology (MEA-CO) International Congress, which was held in Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain. The Kingdom of Bahrain was the first country in the Persian Gulf to have oil wells, which resulted in largely replacing the traditional pearl industry of this country.

In keeping with this pioneering spirit, the authors in this issue have addressed a number of topics that signify the process of change over time. For example, the traditional laser centration technique on the line of sight may not be optimal for all patients as presented by Okamoto and colleagues. Another example is the use of the OPD-Scan II/Station for the evaluation of phakic intraocular lenses (IOLs) rather than traditional aberrometers as presented by Hashem and colleagues and Hamdi.

Change also implies adaptability, a hallmark of NIDEK’s philosophy. NIDEK introduced NAVEX and over the past decade has incorporated a number of technologies to keep it a forerunner in the field. Two examples are the incorporation of one of the first active cyclotorsion error compensation modules in an excimer laser and a 1-KHz active eye tracker. With corneal topographic, aspheric, wavefront-guided, and fully prolate ablations, NIDEK remains a leader in the Middle East and worldwide for its diagnostic and therapeutic applications in vision correction. Traditionally, NIDEK has maintained a commitment to a dynamic and comprehensive education for its users by gathering surgeons worldwide to exchange ideas. This year’s meeting was no different, and practice patterns were realized to be similar regardless of region or country.

In this issue, outcomes of topography-guided treatments (customized aspheric treatment [CATz]), wavefront-guided treatments (optical path difference customized aspheric treatment [OPDCAT]), and optimized aspheric transition zone treatments (OATz) are presented. Amoozadeh and colleagues report keratocyte density after LASIK and PRK using the Confoscan 3. Waring summarizes the clinical implications of recent technological additions to the CXIII and Quest excimer lasers in the form of increased accuracy of laser spot placement with the new 1-kHz infrared eye tracker, which provides the potential for attaining perfect customized corneal treatment. El Danasoury presents his experience with CATz in retreating highly irregular corneas.

I would like to thank Rich Bains, consultant to NIDEK Co Ltd, for his professional contribution and initial edits of the original manuscripts. My sincerest appreciation to Alaa M. El Danasoury, MD, and Hamed M. Anwar, MD, for the spirit of teamwork and the support with this issue. Finally, I would especially like to thank George O. Waring III, MD, Editor-in-Chief, for inviting me to be the guest editor of this supplement.

The articles included in this supplement, editorially reviewed by myself and Dr Waring, receive “S” pagination, indicating the commercial sponsorship of the non-peer reviewed suppplement.

Authors

From the Refractive Surgery and Cornea Unit, Magrabi Eye & Ear Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

The author has no proprietary interest in the materials presented herein.

Correspondence: Ayman N. Hashem, MD, FRCS, Magrabi Eye & Ear Hospital, PO Box 7344, Jeddah 21462, Saudi Arabia. Tel: 96 2636 5000; E-mail: ayman.nasr@magrabi.com.sa

10.3928/1081597X-20090915-01

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