Journal of Refractive Surgery

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Barraquer Lecture 

Richard L. Lindstrom, MD 1995 Barraquer Lecturer Biographical Sketch

Abstract

Richard L. Lindstrom, MD is a recognized leader in corneal, cataract, and refractive surgery. Dr. Lindstrom graduated from Wayzata High School in Wayzata, Minnesota and attended the University of Minnesota, where he graduated magna cum laude from the College of Liberal Arts in 1971. He obtained his Doctor of Medicine in August 1972, as well as a Bachelor of Science. He then performed 6 months of full-time research at the University of Minnesota, supported by a grant from the National Eye Institute. Following a 12-month internship in internal medicine at Northwestern Hospital, he performed another 6 months of full-time research at the University of Minnesota, investigating organ culture of the cornea and corneal physiology, again funded by the National Eye Institute. He then completed a 36-month residency in ophthalmology at the University of Minnesota and affiliated hospitals. Following this, he spent 6 months in fellowship in cornea and external disease at the University of Minnesota Hospitals under the direction of Donald J. Doughman, MD, and John E. Harris, PhD, MD. He then spent 6 months in a fellowship in anterior segment surgery at Mary Shields Eye Hospital in Dallas, under the direction of William S. Harris, MD, and another 6 months as a Heed Fellow in glaucoma and anterior segment surgery at University Hospitals in Salt Lake City.

Following 18 months of private practice in Dallas, where he served as a clinical assistant professor of ophthalmology at Texas Southwestern Medical School, he became a full-time assistant professor of ophthalmology in the Department of Ophthalmology at the University of Minnesota Medical School. In 1988, he became a full professor and was awarded the Harold G. Scheie Research Chair in Ophthalmology. He returned to private practice in 1990 and directs an outpatient clinic adjacent to the Phillips Eye Institute in Minneapolis. He conceptualized the Phillips Eye Institute Center for Teaching & Research, a state-of-the-art ophthalmic research and surgical skills education facility, and currently serves on its board as medical director. Dr. Lindstrom plays an active role in the teaching program for senior residents and fellows at the Phillips Eye Institute and the University of Minnesota Hospital. He also serves as an associate director of the Minnesota Lions Eye Bank.

Dr. Lindstrom holds 25 patents in the following areas: intraocular lens implant technology, corneal preservation, irrigation solutions, viscoelastic solutions, intracorneal lenses, and associated surgical instruments. He has presented 13 named lectures, including the Choyce Medal Lecture at the United Kingdom Intraocular Implant Society, the Irving H. Leopold Lecture at Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia, the Lans Distinguished Refractive Surgery Lecture of the International Society of Refractive Surgery (ISRS), and the Bjerrum Lecture of the Danish Ophthalmological Society Lecture in Copenhagen.

Dr. Lindstrom is chief medical editor of Ocular Surgery News and is active on other editorial boards, including the Journal of Refractive Surgery. He is section editor of the cataract section of Current Opinion in Ophthalmology.

He has served as the secretary of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, as a member of the executive committee of the Eye Bank Association of America, and as member of the Technical Advisory Group for the Hsiao Study: Resource Based Relative Value System. He is past president of the International Society of Refractive Surgery.

He lectures throughout the world on corneal, cataract, and refractive surgery. He has coedited two books, written over 50 book chapters, and published over 300 ophthalmic articles in refereed journals.

Dr. and Mrs. (Jaci) Lindstrom reside in western Minneapolis, living on the shores of Lake Minnetonka. He enjoys boating, sailing, skiing, tennis, golf, and other outdoor sports. His 14-year-old daughter…

Richard L. Lindstrom, MD is a recognized leader in corneal, cataract, and refractive surgery. Dr. Lindstrom graduated from Wayzata High School in Wayzata, Minnesota and attended the University of Minnesota, where he graduated magna cum laude from the College of Liberal Arts in 1971. He obtained his Doctor of Medicine in August 1972, as well as a Bachelor of Science. He then performed 6 months of full-time research at the University of Minnesota, supported by a grant from the National Eye Institute. Following a 12-month internship in internal medicine at Northwestern Hospital, he performed another 6 months of full-time research at the University of Minnesota, investigating organ culture of the cornea and corneal physiology, again funded by the National Eye Institute. He then completed a 36-month residency in ophthalmology at the University of Minnesota and affiliated hospitals. Following this, he spent 6 months in fellowship in cornea and external disease at the University of Minnesota Hospitals under the direction of Donald J. Doughman, MD, and John E. Harris, PhD, MD. He then spent 6 months in a fellowship in anterior segment surgery at Mary Shields Eye Hospital in Dallas, under the direction of William S. Harris, MD, and another 6 months as a Heed Fellow in glaucoma and anterior segment surgery at University Hospitals in Salt Lake City.

Following 18 months of private practice in Dallas, where he served as a clinical assistant professor of ophthalmology at Texas Southwestern Medical School, he became a full-time assistant professor of ophthalmology in the Department of Ophthalmology at the University of Minnesota Medical School. In 1988, he became a full professor and was awarded the Harold G. Scheie Research Chair in Ophthalmology. He returned to private practice in 1990 and directs an outpatient clinic adjacent to the Phillips Eye Institute in Minneapolis. He conceptualized the Phillips Eye Institute Center for Teaching & Research, a state-of-the-art ophthalmic research and surgical skills education facility, and currently serves on its board as medical director. Dr. Lindstrom plays an active role in the teaching program for senior residents and fellows at the Phillips Eye Institute and the University of Minnesota Hospital. He also serves as an associate director of the Minnesota Lions Eye Bank.

Dr. Lindstrom holds 25 patents in the following areas: intraocular lens implant technology, corneal preservation, irrigation solutions, viscoelastic solutions, intracorneal lenses, and associated surgical instruments. He has presented 13 named lectures, including the Choyce Medal Lecture at the United Kingdom Intraocular Implant Society, the Irving H. Leopold Lecture at Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia, the Lans Distinguished Refractive Surgery Lecture of the International Society of Refractive Surgery (ISRS), and the Bjerrum Lecture of the Danish Ophthalmological Society Lecture in Copenhagen.

Dr. Lindstrom is chief medical editor of Ocular Surgery News and is active on other editorial boards, including the Journal of Refractive Surgery. He is section editor of the cataract section of Current Opinion in Ophthalmology.

He has served as the secretary of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, as a member of the executive committee of the Eye Bank Association of America, and as member of the Technical Advisory Group for the Hsiao Study: Resource Based Relative Value System. He is past president of the International Society of Refractive Surgery.

He lectures throughout the world on corneal, cataract, and refractive surgery. He has coedited two books, written over 50 book chapters, and published over 300 ophthalmic articles in refereed journals.

Dr. and Mrs. (Jaci) Lindstrom reside in western Minneapolis, living on the shores of Lake Minnetonka. He enjoys boating, sailing, skiing, tennis, golf, and other outdoor sports. His 14-year-old daughter (Michelle) and 11-year-old son (Michael) keep him busy and entertained in his off-hours.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS OF RICHABD L. LINDSTROM, MD

1. Lindstrom RL, Doughman DJ, Van Horn DL, Dancil D, Harris JE. A metabolic and electron microscopic study of human organ cultured cornea. Am J Ophthalmol 1976;82:72-82.

2. Lindstrom RL, Doughman DJ, Van Horn DL, Schmitt MK, Byrnes PJ. Organ culture corneal storage at ambient room temperature. Arch Ophthalmol 1977;95:869-878.

3. Lindstrom RL, Harris WS. Management of the posterior capsule following posterior chamber lens implantation. J Am Intraocul Implant Soc 1980;6:255-258.

4. Lindstrom RL, Harris WS, LyIe WA. Secondary and exchange posterior chamber lens implantation. J Am Intraocul Implant Soc 1982;8:353-356.

5. Waring GO, Moffitt SD, Gelender H, Laibson PR, Lindstrom RL, Myers WD, Obstbaum SA, Rowsey JJ, Safir A, Schanzlin DJ, Bourque LB, the PERK Study Group. Rationale for and design of the National Eye Institute Prospective Evaluation of Radial Keratotomy (PERK) Study. Ophthalmology 1983;90:40-58.

6. Lindstrom RL, Doughman DJ, Mindrup E. Penetrating keratoplasty following intermediate term organ culture corneal preservation at 37 degrees C. Fortschr Ophthalmol 1983;80:468-471.

7. Lavery GW, Lindstrom RL. Trapezoidal astigmatic keratotomy in human cadaver eyes. J Refract Surg 1985;1:18-24.

8. Lindstrom RL, Destro MA. Effect of incision size and Terry keratometer usage on postoperative astigmatism. J Am Intraocul Implant Soc 1985;11:469-473.

9. Lindstrom RL, Doughman DJ, Skelnik DL, Mindrup EA. Minnesota system corneal preservation. Br J Ophthalmol 1986;70:47-54.

10. Lindstrom RL. Advances in corneal transplantation (Editorial). N Engl J Med 1986;315:57-59.

11. Lindstrom RL. Ophthalmic debate: Is it reasonable to remove a healthy lens to improve vision? JAMA 1987;257:2005.

12. Lindstrom RL. Retinal detachment in axial myopia. Dev Ophthalmol 1987;14:37-41.

13. Lindstrom RL, Doughman DJ, Skelnik DL, Mindrup EA Corneal preservation at 4 degrees C with chondroitin sulfate containing medium. Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc 1988;332-349.

14. Lindstrom RL, LindquistTD. Surgical correction of postoperative astigmatism. Cornea 1988;7:138-148.

15. Lindstrom RL. Lans Distinguished Refractive Surgery Lecture: The surgical correction of astigmatism- a clinician's perspective. Refract Corneal Surg 1990;6:437-454.

16. Lindstrom RL, Sher NA, DeMarchi J. Use of the 193-nm excimer laser for phototherapeutic and photorefractive keratectomy. Health One Medical Journal 1992;1.

17. Lindstrom RL, Kaufman HE, Skelnik DL1 Laing RA, Lass JH, Musch DC, Trousdale MD, Reinhart WJ, Burris TE, Sugar A, Davis RM, Hirokawa K, Smith T, Gordon JF. Optisol corneal storage medium. Am J Ophthalmol 1992; 114: 345-356.

18. Lindstrom RL. FDA Study Update: 1-year results from 671 patients with 3M multifocal intraocular lens. Ophthalmology 1993;100:91-97.

19. Lindstrom RL. Cataract surgery and lens implantation. Current Opinion in Ophthalmology 1994;5:1-185.

20. Lindstrom RL. Minimally invasive radial keratotomy: MiniRK. J Cataract Refract Surg 1995;21:27-34.

21. Smith SG, Lindstrom RL. Intraocular Lens Complications and Their Management. Thorofare, NJ; SLACK 1988.

22. Lindquist TD, Lindstrom RL (eds). Ophthalmic Surgery. Chicago, IL; Year Book Medical Publishers: 1989.

10.3928/1081-597X-19970501-14

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