Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

Images in Pediatric Ophthalmology 

Peripheral Retinal Changes in Regressed Retinopathy of Prematurity

Jessica Minjy Kang, MD; Mariana A. Flores Pimentel, MD; Alejandra G. de Alba Campomanes, MD, MPH

Abstract

An 11-year-old boy who had been born 24 weeks premature and had a history of regressed retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) not requiring treatment during the acute phase presented for a routine examination. His fundus examination was notable for an atrophic retinal hole without surrounding subretinal fluid in the right eye (Figure 1A) and avascular fibrotic changes in both eyes (Figures 1B–1C). Although peripheral retinal abnormalities in premature children have been noted as distinct changes in patients treated with intravitreal bevacizumab,1,2 this case demonstrates that peripheral retinal anomalies occur in other forms of ROP regression.3 Adults with a history of ROP and peripheral retinal changes (lattice-like degeneration or avascular peripheral retina) are at risk for late retinal detachments and tears.4

An 11-year-old boy who had been born 24 weeks premature and had a history of regressed retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) not requiring treatment during the acute phase presented for a routine examination. His fundus examination was notable for an atrophic retinal hole without surrounding subretinal fluid in the right eye (Figure 1A) and avascular fibrotic changes in both eyes (Figures 1B–1C). Although peripheral retinal abnormalities in premature children have been noted as distinct changes in patients treated with intravitreal bevacizumab,1,2 this case demonstrates that peripheral retinal anomalies occur in other forms of ROP regression.3 Adults with a history of ROP and peripheral retinal changes (lattice-like degeneration or avascular peripheral retina) are at risk for late retinal detachments and tears.4

References

  1. Lepore D, Quinn GE, Molle F, et al. Intravitreal bevacizumab versus laser treatment in type 1 retinopathy of prematurity: report on fluorescein angiographic findings. Ophthalmology. 2014;121(11):2212–2219. doi:10.1016/j.ophtha.2014.05.015 [CrossRef]
  2. Toy BC, Schachar IH, Tan GS, Moshfeghi DM. Chronic vascular arrest as a predictor of bevacizumab treatment failure in retinopathy of prematurity. Ophthalmology. 2016;123(10):2166–2175. doi:10.1016/j.ophtha.2016.06.055 [CrossRef]
  3. American Academy of Ophthalmology Retina/Vitreous Panel. Preferred Practice Pattern Guidelines. Posterior Vitreous Detachment, Retinal Breaks, and Lattice Degeneration. San Francisco, CA: American Academy of Ophthalmology; 2014. https://www.aao.org/preferred-practice-pattern/posterior-vitreous-detachment-retinal-breaks-latti-6. Accessed October 8, 2017.
  4. Kaiser RS, Trese MT, Williams GA, Cox MS Jr, . Adult retinopathy of prematurity: outcomes of rhegmatogenous retinal detachments and retinal tears. Ophthalmology. 2001;108(9):1647–1653. doi:10.1016/s0161-6420(01)00660-1 [CrossRef]
Authors

From the Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco, California.

Supported in part by an unstricted institutional grant from Research to Prevent Blindness, LLC., New York, New York.

The authors have no financial or proprietary interest in the materials presented herein.

Correspondence: Alejandra G. de Alba Campomanes, MD, MPH, 10 Koret Way, San Francisco, CA 94143. E-mail: Alejandra.deAlba@ucsf.edu

10.3928/01913913-20191024-02

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