Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

Original Article 

Postoperative Correction and Drift After Vertical Rectus Muscle Transposition for Total Sixth Cranial Nerve Palsy

Lindsay Rothfield, BS; Kara M. Cavuoto, MD; Daniela P. Reyes-Capo, MD; Elizabeth A. Vanner, PhD; Sara F. Grace, MD; Hilda Capo, MD

Abstract

Purpose:

To determine the magnitude of change between the preoperative and postoperative alignment and amount of postoperative drift for two vertical rectus muscle transpositions (VRTs).

Methods:

Retrospective review of medical records of patients with total sixth cranial nerve palsy who underwent VRT procedures. The primary outcome measure was the magnitude of esotropia in prism diopters (PD) at the preoperative and postoperative visits.

Results:

Twenty-seven patients were included. Sixteen had full tendon transposition with Foster augmentation (FTT+FA) and 11 had partial tendon transposition with resection and simultaneous medial rectus recession (PTT+R+MRR). A larger correction was obtained with PTT+R+MRR (mean ± standard deviation [SD]: 52 ± 19 PD; range: 27 to 87 PD) when compared to FTT+FA (mean: 40 ± 13 PD; range: 15 to 68 PD). At postoperative month 2, a greater esotropic drift was noted in the PTT+R+MRR group (16 PD) than the FTT+FA group (6 PD). Although the difference in the amount of correction was not statistically significant (P = .071), the difference in the amount of drift was statistically significant (P = .009).

Conclusions:

There was a trend toward greater correction with PTT+R+MRR than FTT+ FA, but it was not statistically significant. FTT+FA had significantly less postoperative drift than PTT+R+MRR. The results suggest that a small immediate postoperative overcorrection may be desirable in some VRT procedures.

[J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2019;56(4):238–242.]

Abstract

Purpose:

To determine the magnitude of change between the preoperative and postoperative alignment and amount of postoperative drift for two vertical rectus muscle transpositions (VRTs).

Methods:

Retrospective review of medical records of patients with total sixth cranial nerve palsy who underwent VRT procedures. The primary outcome measure was the magnitude of esotropia in prism diopters (PD) at the preoperative and postoperative visits.

Results:

Twenty-seven patients were included. Sixteen had full tendon transposition with Foster augmentation (FTT+FA) and 11 had partial tendon transposition with resection and simultaneous medial rectus recession (PTT+R+MRR). A larger correction was obtained with PTT+R+MRR (mean ± standard deviation [SD]: 52 ± 19 PD; range: 27 to 87 PD) when compared to FTT+FA (mean: 40 ± 13 PD; range: 15 to 68 PD). At postoperative month 2, a greater esotropic drift was noted in the PTT+R+MRR group (16 PD) than the FTT+FA group (6 PD). Although the difference in the amount of correction was not statistically significant (P = .071), the difference in the amount of drift was statistically significant (P = .009).

Conclusions:

There was a trend toward greater correction with PTT+R+MRR than FTT+ FA, but it was not statistically significant. FTT+FA had significantly less postoperative drift than PTT+R+MRR. The results suggest that a small immediate postoperative overcorrection may be desirable in some VRT procedures.

[J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2019;56(4):238–242.]

Introduction

The surgical treatment of total sixth cranial nerve palsy can be challenging. Affected individuals have severe limitation of abduction in the involved eye associated with esotropia, diplopia, and absence of fusion.1–4 Strabismus surgery is performed to restore ocular alignment in primary position and alleviate diplopia.5 The preferred surgical procedures include a variety of partial- or full-tendon vertical rectus muscle transpositions (VRTs) to the lateral rectus muscle insertion.1–3,5–11 These can be augmented by either posterior fixation sutures or resection of the transposed muscles.1,2,10–14 In addition, VRT may be combined with weakening of the ipsilateral medial rectus muscle by recession or injection of botulinum toxin.1,3,5,6

Although prior studies have assessed the surgical correction achieved by various VRT procedures, little is known about the stability of the immediate postoperative alignment. The purpose of our study was to evaluate both the amount of correction obtained and the postoperative drift that occurred with two frequently used VRT procedures to determine the ideal immediate postoperative alignment.

Patients and Methods

A retrospective review of medical records was performed for patients with total sixth cranial nerve palsy who underwent VRT by three different surgeons at the University of Miami. This study was approved by the institutional review board of the University of Miami, was performed in compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, and adhered to the tenets of the Declaration of Helsinki. Financial claims data were searched to identify patients with total sixth cranial nerve palsy who underwent VRT procedures. Total sixth cranial nerve palsy was defined by an inability to abduct past midline with −4 or greater abduction limitation. In patients with bilateral sixth cranial nerve palsy, only the first operated eye was included. Patients with less than 2 months of follow-up and patients who received botulinum toxin injections to the medial rectus muscle were excluded from the study.

The following data were extracted from the medical record: VRT type, whether a medial rectus recession (MRR) was performed at the time of the VRT, preoperative deviation, postoperative day 2 deviation, and postoperative month 2 deviation. The two surgical procedures that were included were: full-tendon transposition with Foster augmentation by posterior fixation suture to the sclera approximately 8 mm posterior to the lateral rectus insertion (FTT+FA)12 and partial-tendon transposition with a 4-mm resection of the transposed segment of the vertical rectus muscle and simultaneous medial rectus recession (PTT+R+MRR).14 The degree of medial rectus contracture was determined by forced duction testing. For the patients with a tight medial rectus muscle, the PTT+R+MRR was the preferred procedure. Patients with adjustable sutures were adjusted in the clinic either the same day of surgery or the morning after. Ocular alignment in the primary position was measured at distance by the alternate prism cover test. Preoperative and postoperative month 2 deviations (in prism diopters [PD]) were compared to determine the total correction. Postoperative day 2 and postoperative month 2 deviations were compared to determine the total postoperative drift.

Statistical Analysis

One- and two-way frequency distributions were created for categorical variables. The continuous outcome variables (drift and correction) were tested for normal distributions. Based on the results of these normal distribution tests, appropriate statistics (parametric and/or non-parametric) were used to compare the difference in drift and correction between the procedures.

The main analysis dataset included only one eye per person because, with such a small data set and the need to use non-parametric statistics, no model could be built to account for the correlation between two eyes of a single person. As a sensitivity analysis, the entire analysis was re-run using the same statistical tests, including the “second eyes” and the “first eyes.” All analyses were done using SAS software (version 9.4; SAS, Inc., Cary, NC). A P value of less than .05 was considered statistically significant.

Results

Twenty-seven patients who underwent VRT for total sixth cranial nerve palsy were included. Sixteen underwent FTT+FA and 11 had PTT+R+MRR. Of the 4 patients with bilateral sixth cranial nerve palsy, 3 underwent FTT+FA and 1 underwent PTT+R+MRR. Only 1 patient with a prior MRR had a reoperation. The mean preoperative deviation was 53 PD (range: 35 to 90 PD) in the FTT+FA group and 55 PD (range: 35 to 95 PD) in the PTT+R+MRR group. Table 1 demonstrates the distance preoperative deviation, postoperative day 2 and month 2 deviations, and postoperative drift and total net correction at month 2 for each patient.

Preoperative and Postoperative Deviations, Drift, and Net Correction for Each Surgical Procedurea (N = 27)

Table 1:

Preoperative and Postoperative Deviations, Drift, and Net Correction for Each Surgical Procedure (N = 27)

FTT+FA

The mean preoperative alignment in patients who had FTT+FA was 53 PD of esotropia (range: 35 to 90 PD of esotropia). The mean postoperative day 2 deviation was 9 PD of esotropia (range: 12 PD of exotropia to 45 PD of esotropia), whereas the mean postoperative month 2 deviation was 17 PD of esotropia (range: 12 PD of exotropia to 75 PD of esotropia). Three patients were orthotropic at the 2-month postoperative follow-up. There was a mean total esotropic drift of 6 ± 9 PD, but it ranged from 10 PD of exotropic drift to 25 PD of esotropic drift. The total correction at 2 months was 40 ± 13 PD (range: 15 to 68 PD). This procedure exhibited the smaller postoperative drift and total correction of the two procedures.

PTT+R+MRR

The mean preoperative alignment in patients who underwent PTT+R+MRR was 55 PD of esotropia (range: 35 to 95 PD of esotropia). The mean MRR was 5.2 mm after adjustment (range: net correction 1 to 11 mm). One patient with prior recession of the medial rectus muscle underwent a re-recession at the time of the PTT+R+MRR, which accounted for an 11-mm recession. The mean deviation was 13 PD of exotropia (range: 35 PD of exotropia to 4 PD of esotropia) on postoperative day 2 and 4 PD of esotropia (range: 15 PD of exotropia to 20 PD of esotropia) on postoperative month 2. At the 2-month follow-up, 2 patients were orthotropic (25%). There was a mean total esotropic drift of 16 ± 11 PD (range: 5 PD of exotropic drift to 33 PD of esotropic drift). The mean total correction at 2 months was 52 ± 19 PD (range: 27 to 87 PD). This procedure demonstrated the larger total correction and postoperative drift.

Correction and Drift

Figure 1 demonstrates the overall correction from the preoperative visit to the postoperative month 2 visit for the two VRT procedures. Figure 2 demonstrates the net drift between the postoperative day 2 and month 2 visits. There was a trend toward greater correction with PTT+R+MRR than FTT+ FA, but the difference was not statistically significant (mean difference: 11, 95% confidence interval: −1 to 24, P = .071). The difference in the amount of drift was statistically significant (mean difference: −11, 95% confidence interval: −19 to −3, P = .009). If surgical success is defined as less than 10 PD of horizontal deviation, the success rate was 73% (8 of 11) for PTT+R+MRR and 44% (7 of 16) for FTT+FA.

Box plot of net correction of the deviation in prism diopters between the preoperative and postoperative month 2 visits of the two vertical rectus transposition procedures. FTT = full-tendon transposition; PTT+R and simultaneous MRR = partial-tendon transposition with resection and simultaneous medial rectus recession

Figure 1.

Box plot of net correction of the deviation in prism diopters between the preoperative and postoperative month 2 visits of the two vertical rectus transposition procedures. FTT = full-tendon transposition; PTT+R and simultaneous MRR = partial-tendon transposition with resection and simultaneous medial rectus recession

Box plot of drift in prism diopters between the postoperative day 2 and postoperative month 2 visits. Positive drifts are esotropic and negative drifts are exotropic. FTT = full-tendon transposition; PTT+R and simultaneous MRR = partial-tendon transposition with resection and simultaneous medial rectus recession

Figure 2.

Box plot of drift in prism diopters between the postoperative day 2 and postoperative month 2 visits. Positive drifts are esotropic and negative drifts are exotropic. FTT = full-tendon transposition; PTT+R and simultaneous MRR = partial-tendon transposition with resection and simultaneous medial rectus recession

Discussion

The surgical treatment of total sixth cranial nerve palsy will ideally include a transposition procedure because resection of a paralytic muscle has limited long-term effect. Methods to balance the adducting force generated by the medial rectus muscle are necessary and can be achieved by VRT. The degree of function of the lateral rectus muscle, degree of contracture of the ipsilateral medial rectus muscle, and preoperative deviation and anticipated postoperative correction and drift are crucial in selecting a procedure for total sixth cranial nerve palsy. Thus, we sought to evaluate the magnitude of change and amount of postoperative drift for two commonly used VRT procedures.

Depending on the type of VRT, the amount of correction varies greatly. Prior studies have shown that FTT procedures correct 30 to 50 PD of esotropia.1,3,13 When combined with resection of the vertical rectus muscles, VRT can correct 33 to 64 PD of esotropia.2 The addition of a medial rectus recession or posterior fixation suture further increases the total correction up to 70 PD (range: 25 to 70 PD).1–3,6,10–12 The Foster augmentation increases the total correction for a full tendon transposition due to the increased tonic abducting force of the transposed muscle.1,2,10–12 The addition of a medial rectus recession decreases the antagonistic tonic force of the medial rectus muscle, allowing for increased abduction of the eye.

When comparing the two groups, the preoperative alignment was similar (53 PD of esotropia in the FTT+FA group vs 55 PD of esotropia in the PTT+R+MRR group). Despite the similar preoperative magnitude of esotropia, the net correction was larger in the PTT+R+MRR group (52 PD) than in the FTT+FA group (40 PD). However, this difference was not statistically significant (P = .071).

The net correction of the PTT+R+MRR procedure ranged from 27 to 87 PD. This is similar but slightly larger than the range reported by Couser et al.14 (range: 29 to 53 PD). In addition, the mean correction in our patients (52 PD) tended to be larger when compared to Couser et al., who found a mean correction of 39 PD. This may be explained by the fact that their cohort had a smaller preoperative deviation (43 vs 55 PD) and a slightly smaller average medial rectus recession (4.9 vs 5.2 mm). The net correction of the FTT+FA procedure averaged 40 PD (range: 15 to 68 PD). The mean correction in our series is similar to that of other authors, who reported a mean of 41.2 PD (range: 37 to 72 PD),10 41.3 PD (range: 25 to 70 PD),2 and 47.5 PD (range: 30 to 80 PD).12

An advantage of PTT+R+MRR is that the medial rectus muscle can be adjusted postoperatively. However, to determine the optimal alignment at the time of adjustment, the postoperative drift should be taken into account. Few studies have investigated or compared the postoperative drift that occurs after VRT procedures used to surgically treat total sixth cranial nerve palsies. Our results show that both procedures had a mean esotropic drift at postoperative month 2, but the mean drift was greater for PTT+R+MRR (16 PD) than FTT+FA (6 PD). This difference was statistically significant (P = .009). We postulate that this may be due to the increase in the abducting tone of transposed muscles that results from the posterior fixation augmentation, which can possibly minimize the esotropic drift.

In contrast to our results, Agarwal et al.15 reported a postoperative exotropic drift following superior rectus transpositions in their 10 patients with sixth cranial nerve palsy. This difference may be attributed to the different transposition procedure, longer follow-up period, and larger mean MRR (5.6 mm in Agarwal et al. vs 5.2 mm in our study). Another contributing factor may be that 7 of the 10 patients also had posterior fixation augmentation sutures, which may have prevented the esotropic drift by enhancing the effect of the VRT.

In our study, 4 patients had an exotropic drift. The only patient in the PTT+R+MRR group who had an exotropic draft was the patient who underwent a re-recession of the medial rectus muscle to a position 15 mm from the limbus. In addition, 3 of 16 patients in the FTT+FA had an exotropic drift at the 2-month postoperative visit. These findings, along with Agarwal et al.'s results, suggest that larger recessions of the medial rectus muscle and posterior fixation augmentation sutures may be associated with less esotropic drift after VRT.

Our study had several limitations, including the retrospective nature of chart review, a relatively small patient population, and a different number of patients in each surgical group. We did not have complete preoperative and postoperative data regarding the limitation to abduction or ocular torticollis. A wide range of correction was obtained for each group, which could be due to multiple surgeons with differing techniques. This might also have resulted from patients with a −4 duction deficit being compared to those with −5 or worse deficits. It is also possible that some patients may have had only a partial palsy and a tight medial rectus muscle that masked some of the abducting capability. A final discrepancy could lie in the fact that there were different examiners assessing and measuring alignment, thus introducing another source of variability. Additionally, there was a wide range in the postoperative drift and it is possible that additional changes in alignment could occur at postoperative time intervals longer than 2 months. Despite these limitations, our study provides valuable information because it directly compares two VRT procedures by evaluating not only the postoperative correction, but also the immediate postoperative drift, which has not been reported to this extent in prior studies.

If surgical success is defined as less than 10 PD of horizontal deviation, the success rate of PTT+R+MRR was 73% and that of FTT+FA was 44%. We identified that PTT+R+MRR had a larger correction despite a greater postoperative esotropic drift when compared to FTT+FA. With this in mind, targeting a small immediate postoperative overcorrection may be desirable in PTT procedures.

References

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Preoperative and Postoperative Deviations, Drift, and Net Correction for Each Surgical Procedurea (N = 27)

Preoperative Deviation (PD)Postoperative Day 2 Deviation (PD)Postoperative Month 2 Deviation (PD)ET Drift (PD)Correction (PD)
FTT+FA (n = 16)
  85 ET20 ET30 ET1055
  90 ET45 ET50 ET540
  50 ET12 ET15 ET335
  45 ET15 ET12 ET3 XT33
  50 ET6 XT2 ET848
  64 ET10 ET30 ET2034
  54 ETOrtho5 ET549
  45 ET10 XTOrtho1045
  35 ET12 XT12 XT047
  50 ET10 ETOrtho10 XT50
  70 ET6 ET2 ET4 XT68
  35 ETOrthoOrtho035
  60 ET20 ET25 ET535
  50 ETOrtho25 ET2525
  35 ET10 ET20 ET1015
  35 ETOrtho4 ET431
PTT+R+MRR (n = 11)
  50 ET10 XT15 XT5 XT65
  95 ET(8 XT) Ortho8 ET887
  35 ET14 XT2 ET1633
  35 ET6 XT8 ET1427
  45 ET(25 XT) 20 XT2 ET2243
  80 ET4 ET20 ET1660
  58 ET4 XTOrtho458
  35 ET30 XTOrtho3035
  50 ET(6 XT) 8 XT16 ET2434
  66 ET35 XT2 XT3368
  60 ET(14 XT) 16 XT2 ET1858
Authors

From the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute (KMC, EAV, HC) and University of Miami Miller School of Medicine (LR, DPR-C), Miami, Florida; and the Department of Ophthalmology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (SFG).

The authors have no financial or proprietary interest in the materials presented herein.

Correspondence: Hilda Capo, MD, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 900 NW 17th Street, Miami, FL 33136. E-mail: hcapo@med.miami.edu

Received: September 11, 2018
Accepted: March 19, 2019

10.3928/01913913-20190322-01

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