Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

Images in Pediatric Ophthalmology 

Multipartite Torpedo Maculopathy

James Vassallo, MD

Abstract

A 31-year-old woman was seen for a routine refraction. She was asymptomatic and her vision was normal. Funduscopy of her left eye revealed a cluster of four macular lesions of different sizes that were consistent with possible atypical multipartite torpedo maculopathy. The individual lesions have a previously described rounded lateral hyperpigmented margin. The group of lesions closer to the horizontal mid-line are confluent. The separate lesion below this group has a hypopigmented spot temporal to it; this could represent the location where an additional torpedo maculopathy would have formed. This is an atypical appearance of torpedo maculopathy, and it represents the first documented quadripartite configuration of this condition. Cases with multiple torpedo lesions have an unclear etiology, which can make recognition of torpedo maculopathy difficult and prompt unnecessary referral. Torpedo maculopathy is usually inconsequential, but rarely choroidal neovascular membrane formation can occur. Long-term follow-up is recommended, and patients with torpedo maculopathy presenting with decreased visual acuity or visual symptoms should be fully evaluated.…

A 31-year-old woman was seen for a routine refraction. She was asymptomatic and her vision was normal. Funduscopy of her left eye revealed a cluster of four macular lesions of different sizes that were consistent with possible atypical multipartite torpedo maculopathy. The individual lesions have a previously described rounded lateral hyperpigmented margin. The group of lesions closer to the horizontal mid-line are confluent. The separate lesion below this group has a hypopigmented spot temporal to it; this could represent the location where an additional torpedo maculopathy would have formed. This is an atypical appearance of torpedo maculopathy, and it represents the first documented quadripartite configuration of this condition. Cases with multiple torpedo lesions have an unclear etiology, which can make recognition of torpedo maculopathy difficult and prompt unnecessary referral. Torpedo maculopathy is usually inconsequential, but rarely choroidal neovascular membrane formation can occur. Long-term follow-up is recommended, and patients with torpedo maculopathy presenting with decreased visual acuity or visual symptoms should be fully evaluated.

References

  1. Shields CL, Guzman JM, Shapiro MJ, Fogel LE, Shields JA. Torpedo maculopathy at the site of the fetal “bulge.”Arch Ophthalmol. 2010;128:499–501. doi:10.1001/archophthalmol.2010.29 [CrossRef]
  2. Raju B, Nooyi C, Raju NS, Nidheesh S. Torpedo maculopathy with double torpedoes. Indian J Ophthalmol. 2018;66:1189–1190. doi:10.4103/ijo.IJO_192_18 [CrossRef]
  3. Shirley K, O'Neill M, Gamble R, Ramsey A, McLoone E. Torpedo maculopathy: disease spectrum and associated choroidal neovascularisation in a paediatric population. Eye (Lond). 2018;32:1315–1320. doi:10.1038/s41433-018-0074-7 [CrossRef]
Authors

From the Department of Ophthalmology, Mater Dei Hospital, Malta.

The author has no financial or proprietary interest in the materials presented herein.

Correspondence: James Vassallo, MD, Department of Ophthalmology, Mater Dei Hospital, Triq Id-Donaturi Tad-Demm, Tal-Qroqq, Msida, MSD 2090, Malta. E-mail: jamesvassallo2000@yahoo.com

10.3928/01913913-20181213-02

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