Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

Images in Pediatric Ophthalmology 

Blood Vessel on the Superior Oblique Muscle Sheath

Ze Wang, MD; Chunhua Sun, MD, PhD

Abstract

Figure

Figure

A 35-year-old man with left inferior oblique palsy presented with significant superior oblique overaction. Visual acuity in both eyes was 6/6. Anterior segments and fundi were unremarkable. He had no history of previous ocular disorder or trauma. The left eye was limited in superduction, especially superonasally. The left eye showed 35 prism diopters (PD) hypotropia and 9 PD exotropia in primary position, 45 PD hypotropia in right up gaze, and 40 PD hypotropia and 6 PD exotropia in right down gaze. Squint angles in other positions were significantly reduced. There were no subjective or objective cyclotropia with double Maddox rod test or fundi images. Titmus stereoacuity result was no stereoacuity. Intrasheath tenectomy of the superior oblique muscle was performed with an operating microscope. (A) A blood vessel was detected lying on the sheath (arrow). It was different from the delineation by Parks.1 (B) The vessel could be blocked with electric coagulation (arrow).

Figure. A 35-year-old man with left inferior oblique palsy presented with significant superior oblique overaction. Visual acuity in both eyes was 6/6. Anterior segments and fundi were unremarkable. He had no history of previous ocular disorder or trauma. The left eye was limited in superduction, especially superonasally. The left eye showed 35 prism diopters (PD) hypotropia and 9 PD exotropia in primary position, 45 PD hypotropia in right up gaze, and 40 PD hypotropia and 6 PD exotropia in right down gaze. Squint angles in other positions were significantly reduced. There were no subjective or objective cyclotropia with double Maddox rod test or fundi images. Titmus stereoacuity result was no stereoacuity. Intrasheath tenectomy of the superior oblique muscle was performed with an operating microscope. (A) A blood vessel was detected lying on the sheath (arrow). It was different from the delineation by Parks.1 (B) The vessel could be blocked with electric coagulation (arrow).

Reference

  1. Parks MM. The superior oblique tendon. Trans Ophthalmol Soc U K. 1977;97:288–304.

10.3928/01913913-20110825-02

Sign up to receive

Journal E-contents