Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

CME Quiz 

CME Quiz: Outcomes of Strabismus Surgery for Esotropia in Children With Down Syndrome Compared With Matched Controls

Abstract

Review the stated learning objectives on the first page of the CME article and determine if these objectives match your individual learning needs.

Read the article carefully. Do not neglect the tables and other illustrative materials, as they have been selected to enhance your knowledge and understanding.

The following quiz questions have been designed to provide a useful link between the CME article in the issue and your everyday practice. Read each question, choose the correct answer, and record your answer on the CME REGISTRATION FORM at the end of the quiz.

Type or print your full name and address and your date of birth in the space provided on the CME REGISTRATION FORM.

Complete the Evaluation portion of the CME Registration Form. Forms and quizzes cannot be processed if the Evaluation portion is incomplete. The Evaluation portion of the CME Registration Form will be separated from the quiz upon receipt at JOURNAL OF PEDIATRIC OPHTHALMOLOGY & STRABISMUS. Your evaluation of this activity will in no way affect the scoring of your quiz. NO PAYMENT REQUIRED. You may be contacted at a future date with a follow-up survey to this activity.

Send the completed form to: JOURNAL OF PEDIATRIC OPHTHALMOLOGY & STRABISMUS CME Quiz, PO Box 36, Thorofare, NJ 08086.

Be sure to mail the CME Registration Form on or before the deadline listed. After that date, the quiz will close. CME Registration Forms received after the date listed will not be processed.

Your answers will be graded and you will receive a certificate via mail within 4 to 6 weeks advising you whether you have passed or failed. A score of at least 80% is required to pass. Unanswered questions will be considered incorrect.

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of Vindico Medical Education and the Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology & Strabismus. Vindico Medical Education is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Vindico Medical Education designates this journal-based educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

This activity is approved for credit from the original date of release, July 1, 2012, through the expiration date of July 15, 2013.

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education’s Standards for Commercial Support, all CME providers are required to disclose to the activity audience the relevant financial relationships of the planners, teachers, and authors involved in the development of CME content. An individual has a relevant financial relationship if he or she has a financial relationship in any amount occurring in the last 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or services are discussed in the CME activity content over which the individual has control. Relationship information appears prior to the content.

The audience is advised that this continuing medical education activity may contain references to unlabeled uses of FDA-approved products or to products not approved by the FDA for use in the United States. The faculty members have been made aware of their obligation to disclose such usage.

This CME activity is primarily targeted to pediatric ophthalmologists and ophthalmic surgeons. There are no specific background requirements for participants taking this activity.

An 8-year-old girl with Down syndrome is referred by her pediatrician for suspected strabismus.

The mostly likely heterotropia expected in this patient would be:

V-pattern exotropia.

A-pattern exotropia.

Esotropia.

Hypertropia.

Among children with Down syndrome:

Strabismus is common.

Strabismus rarely…

How to Obtain Credit By Reading This Article

  1. Review the stated learning objectives on the first page of the CME article and determine if these objectives match your individual learning needs.

  2. Read the article carefully. Do not neglect the tables and other illustrative materials, as they have been selected to enhance your knowledge and understanding.

  3. The following quiz questions have been designed to provide a useful link between the CME article in the issue and your everyday practice. Read each question, choose the correct answer, and record your answer on the CME REGISTRATION FORM at the end of the quiz.

  4. Type or print your full name and address and your date of birth in the space provided on the CME REGISTRATION FORM.

  5. Complete the Evaluation portion of the CME Registration Form. Forms and quizzes cannot be processed if the Evaluation portion is incomplete. The Evaluation portion of the CME Registration Form will be separated from the quiz upon receipt at JOURNAL OF PEDIATRIC OPHTHALMOLOGY & STRABISMUS. Your evaluation of this activity will in no way affect the scoring of your quiz. NO PAYMENT REQUIRED. You may be contacted at a future date with a follow-up survey to this activity.

  6. Send the completed form to: JOURNAL OF PEDIATRIC OPHTHALMOLOGY & STRABISMUS CME Quiz, PO Box 36, Thorofare, NJ 08086.

  7. Be sure to mail the CME Registration Form on or before the deadline listed. After that date, the quiz will close. CME Registration Forms received after the date listed will not be processed.

Method for Obtaining Credit Certificate

Your answers will be graded and you will receive a certificate via mail within 4 to 6 weeks advising you whether you have passed or failed. A score of at least 80% is required to pass. Unanswered questions will be considered incorrect.

CME Accreditation

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of Vindico Medical Education and the Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology & Strabismus. Vindico Medical Education is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Vindico Medical Education designates this journal-based educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

This activity is approved for credit from the original date of release, July 1, 2012, through the expiration date of July 15, 2013.

Full Disclosure Policy

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education’s Standards for Commercial Support, all CME providers are required to disclose to the activity audience the relevant financial relationships of the planners, teachers, and authors involved in the development of CME content. An individual has a relevant financial relationship if he or she has a financial relationship in any amount occurring in the last 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or services are discussed in the CME activity content over which the individual has control. Relationship information appears prior to the content.

Unlabeled and Investigational Usage

The audience is advised that this continuing medical education activity may contain references to unlabeled uses of FDA-approved products or to products not approved by the FDA for use in the United States. The faculty members have been made aware of their obligation to disclose such usage.

Target Audience

This CME activity is primarily targeted to pediatric ophthalmologists and ophthalmic surgeons. There are no specific background requirements for participants taking this activity.

Case Scenario

An 8-year-old girl with Down syndrome is referred by her pediatrician for suspected strabismus.

CME Questions

  1. The mostly likely heterotropia expected in this patient would be:

    1. V-pattern exotropia.

    2. A-pattern exotropia.

    3. Esotropia.

    4. Hypertropia.

  2. Among children with Down syndrome:

    1. Strabismus is common.

    2. Strabismus rarely occurs unless the patient has had a longstanding unilateral cataract.

    3. Strabismus surgery is contraindicated.

    4. Strabismus surgery outcomes are similar to those of children with other neurodevelopmental disorders.

Case Scenario

A 10-year-old boy with Down syndrome is observed for 6 months and demonstrates a stable comitant nonaccommodative esotropia of 40 prism diopters.

CME Questions

  1. In planning bilateral medial rectus recession surgery for this patient, the surgeon should:

    1. Increase surgical dosage by 0.5 mm for each rectus muscle.

    2. Use typical surgical dosage for each rectus muscle.

    3. Decrease surgical dosage by 10% for each rectus muscle.

    4. Supraplace both medial rectus tendons by ¼ tendon width.

  2. The patient’s parent should be advised that children with Down syndrome:

    1. Have significantly more overcorrection than typical children.

    2. Have significantly more undercorrection than typical children.

    3. Have postoperative esotropia at a similar rate as typical children.

    4. Never have overcorrection.

10.3928/01913913-20120701-11

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