Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

Images in Pediatric Ophthalmology 

Isolated Trichomegaly Causing Mechanical Ptosis

David S. Walton, MD; Nonavinakere P. Manjunatha, MD, MRCOphth; Lawrence Gnanaraj, MD

Abstract

The Images in Pediatric Ophthalmology column is a 1-page photo essay showing encounters in the field of pediatric ophthalmology.

Abstract

The Images in Pediatric Ophthalmology column is a 1-page photo essay showing encounters in the field of pediatric ophthalmology.

Readers are invited to submit their own interesting images from practice for publication. For submission requirements, please e-mail the Journal at JPOS@slackinc.com.

Images courtesy of Nonavinakere P. Manjunatha, MD, MRCOphth; Lawrence Gnanaraj, FRCS, FRCEd

Incidental isolated trichomegaly causing mechanical ptosis was noticed in a 7-year-old boy (left). The eyelashes measured 15 mm and were touching the lens of the spectacle (right). Hyperopia, left esotropia, and right optic disc pit were found on ocular examination. The child had normal stature, no learning difficulties, and no retinal pigmentary degeneration. Trichomegaly, or hypertrichosis of the eyelashes, is defined by increased length, thickness, stiffness, and curling of the eyelashes. It can be congenital or acquired. Congenital trichomegaly can be associated with pigmentary degeneration of the retina, dwarfism, and mental retardation (Oliver-McFarlane syndrome) or can be isolated. Trichomegaly is also one of the rare causes of mechanical ptosis. Thorough ocular and systemic examination is essential in patients with trichomegaly.

References

  1. Oliver GL, McFarlane DC. Congenital trichomegaly with associated pigmentary degeneration of the retina, dwarfism, and mental retardation. Arch Ophthalmol. 1965;74:169.
  2. Casson RJ, Selva D. Lash ptosis caused by latanoprost. Am J Ophthalmol. 2005;139:932–933. doi:10.1016/j.ajo.2004.10.062 [CrossRef]
  3. Haritoglou C, Rudolph G, Kalpadakis P, Boergen KP. Congenital trichomegaly (Oliver-McFarlane syndrome): a case report with 9 years’ follow up. Br J Ophthalmol. 2003;87:119–120. doi:10.1136/bjo.87.1.119 [CrossRef]

10.3928/01913913-20081101-08

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