Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

CME Article 

Intermittent Exotropia

Michael P. Clarke, FRCS, FRCOphth

  • Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. 2007;44(3):153-157
  • Posted May 1, 2007

Abstract

ABSTRACT

This article describes the clinical manifestations of and management options for intermittent exotropia. Control of the strabismus is one of the parameters that can be assessed for all children with the condition. A method of quantifying control, the Newcastle Control Score, is presented.

J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus 2007;44:153-157.

AUTHOR

Dr. Clarke is a Consultant Pediatric Ophthalmologist, Newcastle upon Tyne NHS Foundation Trust, and a Reader in Ophthalmology, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.

Originally submitted July 15, 2006.

Accepted for publication July 31, 2006.

Address correspondence to Michael P. Clarke, FRCS, FRCOphth, Children’s Eye Department, Claremont Wing, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 4LP, United Kingdom.

Dr. Clarke has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

The audience is advised that this continuing medical education activity may contain references to unlabeled uses of FDA-approved products or to products not approved by the FDA for use in the United States. The faculty members have been made aware of their obligation to disclose such usage.

The material presented at or in any Vindico Medical Education continuing medical education activity does not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of Vindico Medical Education or SLACK Incorporated. Neither Vindico Medical Education or SLACK Incorporated, nor the faculty endorse or recommend any techniques, commercial products, or manufacturers. The faculty/author may discuss the use of materials and/or products that have not yet been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. All readers and continuing education participants should verify all information before treating patients or utilizing any product.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

This article describes the clinical manifestations of and management options for intermittent exotropia. Control of the strabismus is one of the parameters that can be assessed for all children with the condition. A method of quantifying control, the Newcastle Control Score, is presented.

J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus 2007;44:153-157.

AUTHOR

Dr. Clarke is a Consultant Pediatric Ophthalmologist, Newcastle upon Tyne NHS Foundation Trust, and a Reader in Ophthalmology, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.

Originally submitted July 15, 2006.

Accepted for publication July 31, 2006.

Address correspondence to Michael P. Clarke, FRCS, FRCOphth, Children’s Eye Department, Claremont Wing, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 4LP, United Kingdom.

Dr. Clarke has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

The audience is advised that this continuing medical education activity may contain references to unlabeled uses of FDA-approved products or to products not approved by the FDA for use in the United States. The faculty members have been made aware of their obligation to disclose such usage.

The material presented at or in any Vindico Medical Education continuing medical education activity does not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of Vindico Medical Education or SLACK Incorporated. Neither Vindico Medical Education or SLACK Incorporated, nor the faculty endorse or recommend any techniques, commercial products, or manufacturers. The faculty/author may discuss the use of materials and/or products that have not yet been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. All readers and continuing education participants should verify all information before treating patients or utilizing any product.

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