Ophthalmic innovator to receive award at glaucoma meeting

A veteran of ophthalmic research, one not typically known for his contributions to glaucoma, will receive the Catalyst Award at Glaucoma 360 in February.

“I am honored by the Catalyst Award. While I am best known for my work in the fields of cornea, cataract and refractive surgery, my interest in the management of glaucoma is longstanding,” Richard L. Lindstrom, MD, OSN Chief Medical Editor, told Ocular Surgery News.

Hosted by the Glaucoma Research Foundation, the 3-day event will bring together leaders in research, industry, finance, clinical ophthalmology and philanthropy, as well as representatives from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, in an effort to promote collaborative endeavors aimed at curing glaucoma.

Dr. Lindstrom will accept the Catalyst Award on the first day, at the Glaucoma Research Foundation Annual Benefit, which seeks to raise funds in support of innovative research, education and outreach.

“The Glaucoma Research Foundation’s Catalyst Award honors individuals who have advanced our knowledge of glaucoma through innovation and collaboration. Dr. Lindstrom has shown a deep personal commitment to innovation and has stressed that every ophthalmologist has an obligation to advance the field,” Adrienne Graves, PhD, originator of the Glaucoma 360 concept, said.

Dr. Lindstrom completed a 6-month fellowship in glaucoma at the University of Utah in 1978 and has been responsible for managing cases associated with cataract and corneal disease throughout his career.

“My interest in glaucoma is now focused on minimally invasive surgery, and I am currently working with Glaukos, Transcend and Aquesys to bring this promising technology to market. Glaucoma is ever more prevalent as our population ages, and I am fully supportive of the Glaucoma Research Foundation’s mission to advance the art and science of this field,” Dr. Lindstrom said.

In recent years, he worked on two studies published in the Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery demonstrating that patients with glaucoma or ocular hypertension who have an IOP of 25 mm Hg or more may achieve pressure reductions of 6 mm Hg to 8 mm Hg with phacoemulsification alone.

“Dr. Lindstrom has shown strong leadership in advancing innovation in surgical techniques, as well as playing key roles in developing new ophthalmic drugs and devices. He has recently been lauded for championing the need for improving regulatory processes to pave the way for continued innovation in ophthalmology,” Dr. Graves said.

Dr. Lindstrom’s dedication to innovative research is a key reason he is being recognized with the Catalyst Award and will be a keynote speaker at the meeting, which will also feature the annual CME-sponsored Glaucoma Symposium and the New Horizons Forum promoting collaboration among medical and corporate sectors. – by Michelle Pagnani

References:

  • Poley BJ, Lindstrom RL, Samuelson TW. Long-term effects of phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation in normotensive and ocular hypertensive eyes. J Cataract Refract Surg. 2008;34:735-742.
  • Poley BJ, Lindstrom RL, Samuelson TW, Schulze R. Intraocular pressure reduction after phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation in glaucomatous and nonglaucomatous eyes. J Cataract Refract Surg. 2009;35:1946-1955.

  • Adrienne Graves, PhD, can be reached at 999 Green Street, San Francisco, CA 94133; 707-477-5314; email: agraves8667@gmail.com.
  • Richard L. Lindstrom, MD, can be reached at Minnesota Eye Consultants, 9801 DuPont Ave. S, Suite 200, Bloomington, MN 55431; 952-888-5800; fax: 952-567-6182; email: rllindstrom@mneye.com.
  • Disclosures: Dr. Graves has no relevant financial disclosures. Dr. Lindstrom is a consultant for Alcon, Transcend, Glaukos and Aquesys.

A veteran of ophthalmic research, one not typically known for his contributions to glaucoma, will receive the Catalyst Award at Glaucoma 360 in February.

“I am honored by the Catalyst Award. While I am best known for my work in the fields of cornea, cataract and refractive surgery, my interest in the management of glaucoma is longstanding,” Richard L. Lindstrom, MD, OSN Chief Medical Editor, told Ocular Surgery News.

Hosted by the Glaucoma Research Foundation, the 3-day event will bring together leaders in research, industry, finance, clinical ophthalmology and philanthropy, as well as representatives from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, in an effort to promote collaborative endeavors aimed at curing glaucoma.

Dr. Lindstrom will accept the Catalyst Award on the first day, at the Glaucoma Research Foundation Annual Benefit, which seeks to raise funds in support of innovative research, education and outreach.

“The Glaucoma Research Foundation’s Catalyst Award honors individuals who have advanced our knowledge of glaucoma through innovation and collaboration. Dr. Lindstrom has shown a deep personal commitment to innovation and has stressed that every ophthalmologist has an obligation to advance the field,” Adrienne Graves, PhD, originator of the Glaucoma 360 concept, said.

Dr. Lindstrom completed a 6-month fellowship in glaucoma at the University of Utah in 1978 and has been responsible for managing cases associated with cataract and corneal disease throughout his career.

“My interest in glaucoma is now focused on minimally invasive surgery, and I am currently working with Glaukos, Transcend and Aquesys to bring this promising technology to market. Glaucoma is ever more prevalent as our population ages, and I am fully supportive of the Glaucoma Research Foundation’s mission to advance the art and science of this field,” Dr. Lindstrom said.

In recent years, he worked on two studies published in the Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery demonstrating that patients with glaucoma or ocular hypertension who have an IOP of 25 mm Hg or more may achieve pressure reductions of 6 mm Hg to 8 mm Hg with phacoemulsification alone.

“Dr. Lindstrom has shown strong leadership in advancing innovation in surgical techniques, as well as playing key roles in developing new ophthalmic drugs and devices. He has recently been lauded for championing the need for improving regulatory processes to pave the way for continued innovation in ophthalmology,” Dr. Graves said.

Dr. Lindstrom’s dedication to innovative research is a key reason he is being recognized with the Catalyst Award and will be a keynote speaker at the meeting, which will also feature the annual CME-sponsored Glaucoma Symposium and the New Horizons Forum promoting collaboration among medical and corporate sectors. – by Michelle Pagnani

References:

  • Poley BJ, Lindstrom RL, Samuelson TW. Long-term effects of phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation in normotensive and ocular hypertensive eyes. J Cataract Refract Surg. 2008;34:735-742.
  • Poley BJ, Lindstrom RL, Samuelson TW, Schulze R. Intraocular pressure reduction after phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation in glaucomatous and nonglaucomatous eyes. J Cataract Refract Surg. 2009;35:1946-1955.

  • Adrienne Graves, PhD, can be reached at 999 Green Street, San Francisco, CA 94133; 707-477-5314; email: agraves8667@gmail.com.
  • Richard L. Lindstrom, MD, can be reached at Minnesota Eye Consultants, 9801 DuPont Ave. S, Suite 200, Bloomington, MN 55431; 952-888-5800; fax: 952-567-6182; email: rllindstrom@mneye.com.
  • Disclosures: Dr. Graves has no relevant financial disclosures. Dr. Lindstrom is a consultant for Alcon, Transcend, Glaukos and Aquesys.