Read OSN’s Jan. 10 publication exclusives online

The cover story in the Jan. 10, 2019, issue of Ocular Surgery News focuses on new glaucoma therapies and delivery systems.

Here are some of the issue’s publication exclusives:

 

Cover Story

New pharmacotherapies and delivery systems broaden glaucoma landscape

After many years at a standstill, the entire landscape of glaucoma is changing rapidly on both the surgical side and the medical side. MIGS is now a well-established concept, new topical medications have entered the scene, and new modes of delivery are in the pipeline, some near to completion of phase 3 trials. Read more.

 

Lindstroms Perspective

Cost may hinder use of new glaucoma drugs

First-line therapy for glaucoma in the United States is still the prescription of drop therapy. While some glaucoma specialists argue that selective laser trabeculoplasty or even a MIGS procedure in combination with cataract surgery is a competitive alternative for first-line therapy, those options are rarely employed in that fashion. Read more.

 

By the Numbers

Coaching up and down the ranks to enhance practice performance

There is nothing more uncommon in the business of ophthalmology than a recognition that your practice is a sum of its parts — each of which must be groomed individually if you hope to provide superior patient care. Read more.

 

Challenges in Ophthalmology with April Steinert

Shortage of skilled technicians can lead to inefficient clinics

Jane Shuman, MSM , COT, COE, OCS, CMSS, OSC , president and founder of Eyetechs Inc. and, more importantly to me, a long-time friend, recently met me for lunch, and we got to chatting about challenges in ophthalmology. Jane, who lives, eats and breathes ophthalmology, and is well-known throughout the eyeball community as a “fixer” of inefficient clinics, described to me what she sees as the two biggest hurdles our field faces. Read more.

 

Complications Consult

Modified technique addresses acute corneal hydrops

Acute corneal hydrops occurs secondary to a tear in the Descemet’s membrane and results from aqueous seepage into the stroma, forming fluid clefts. Conventionally, this is managed medically with compression sutures or with intracameral gas or air injections followed in many cases by a secondary pre-Descemetic deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty at a later stage. Read more.

The cover story in the Jan. 10, 2019, issue of Ocular Surgery News focuses on new glaucoma therapies and delivery systems.

Here are some of the issue’s publication exclusives:

 

Cover Story

New pharmacotherapies and delivery systems broaden glaucoma landscape

After many years at a standstill, the entire landscape of glaucoma is changing rapidly on both the surgical side and the medical side. MIGS is now a well-established concept, new topical medications have entered the scene, and new modes of delivery are in the pipeline, some near to completion of phase 3 trials. Read more.

 

Lindstroms Perspective

Cost may hinder use of new glaucoma drugs

First-line therapy for glaucoma in the United States is still the prescription of drop therapy. While some glaucoma specialists argue that selective laser trabeculoplasty or even a MIGS procedure in combination with cataract surgery is a competitive alternative for first-line therapy, those options are rarely employed in that fashion. Read more.

 

By the Numbers

Coaching up and down the ranks to enhance practice performance

There is nothing more uncommon in the business of ophthalmology than a recognition that your practice is a sum of its parts — each of which must be groomed individually if you hope to provide superior patient care. Read more.

 

Challenges in Ophthalmology with April Steinert

Shortage of skilled technicians can lead to inefficient clinics

Jane Shuman, MSM , COT, COE, OCS, CMSS, OSC , president and founder of Eyetechs Inc. and, more importantly to me, a long-time friend, recently met me for lunch, and we got to chatting about challenges in ophthalmology. Jane, who lives, eats and breathes ophthalmology, and is well-known throughout the eyeball community as a “fixer” of inefficient clinics, described to me what she sees as the two biggest hurdles our field faces. Read more.

 

Complications Consult

Modified technique addresses acute corneal hydrops

Acute corneal hydrops occurs secondary to a tear in the Descemet’s membrane and results from aqueous seepage into the stroma, forming fluid clefts. Conventionally, this is managed medically with compression sutures or with intracameral gas or air injections followed in many cases by a secondary pre-Descemetic deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty at a later stage. Read more.