In the Journals

Majority of patients able to measure own IOP in study

A study found 73% of patients were successfully able to use a rebound tonometer to perform self-tonometry and obtain an IOP reading within 5 mm Hg of a clinician.

This observational study included both eyes of 100 patients with glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Patients went through a short training session on the correct method of measuring their own IOP. Each patient received a three-item questionnaire to measure perceptions of self-tonometry.

All patients had their IOP measured in both eyes by an experienced glaucoma specialist before performing their own measurements. Seventy-three patients successfully came within 5 mm Hg of the specialist’s measurement, while six were partially successfully, defined as those deemed to have good technique but not within 5 mm Hg of the specialist’s reading. Of the 79 successful or partially successful patients, 92% said they “would be happy to perform self-tonometry in the future,” according to the researchers.

Self-tonometry was deemed comfortable and relatively easy to perform and has the potential to improve patient engagement in their own care, while also providing a more complete picture of IOP changes over time, which may have significant implications for disease management,” they wrote. – by Robert Linnehan

Disclosures: Pronin reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

A study found 73% of patients were successfully able to use a rebound tonometer to perform self-tonometry and obtain an IOP reading within 5 mm Hg of a clinician.

This observational study included both eyes of 100 patients with glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Patients went through a short training session on the correct method of measuring their own IOP. Each patient received a three-item questionnaire to measure perceptions of self-tonometry.

All patients had their IOP measured in both eyes by an experienced glaucoma specialist before performing their own measurements. Seventy-three patients successfully came within 5 mm Hg of the specialist’s measurement, while six were partially successfully, defined as those deemed to have good technique but not within 5 mm Hg of the specialist’s reading. Of the 79 successful or partially successful patients, 92% said they “would be happy to perform self-tonometry in the future,” according to the researchers.

Self-tonometry was deemed comfortable and relatively easy to perform and has the potential to improve patient engagement in their own care, while also providing a more complete picture of IOP changes over time, which may have significant implications for disease management,” they wrote. – by Robert Linnehan

Disclosures: Pronin reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.