Relationship seen between ocular perfusion pressure, confirmed glaucoma

A cross-sectional study of patients with hypertension suggests a close relationship between ocular perfusion pressure and confirmed glaucoma.

The Colombian Glaucoma Study included patients with hypertension and diabetes from six cities in Colombia. This analysis included 1,272 patients, of which 131 were diagnosed with suspected glaucoma and 65 with confirmed glaucoma. Researchers used a multinomial logistic regression to assess the relationship among blood pressure, ocular perfusion pressure and the presence of glaucoma.

Sixty percent of the subjects were diagnosed with hypertension for more than 5 years, and 32.4% had diabetes.

Adjustments were made for age, sex, diabetes, type of antihypertensive drugs used, time since diagnosis and IOP, and no relationship was found between the occurrence of glaucoma and systemic blood pressure or mean arterial blood pressure. There was an association between patients with high values of diastolic blood pressure of greater than 90 mm Hg or low values of ocular perfusion pressure less than 40 mm Hg with an increased risk for confirmed primary open-angle glaucoma.

“The findings of our cross-sectional study in hypertensive patients suggest that there is a close relationship between [ocular perfusion pressure] values and confirmed [primary open-angle glaucoma], providing further evidence of the vascular mechanism in glaucoma pathogenesis,” the study authors wrote. – by Robert Linnehan

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

A cross-sectional study of patients with hypertension suggests a close relationship between ocular perfusion pressure and confirmed glaucoma.

The Colombian Glaucoma Study included patients with hypertension and diabetes from six cities in Colombia. This analysis included 1,272 patients, of which 131 were diagnosed with suspected glaucoma and 65 with confirmed glaucoma. Researchers used a multinomial logistic regression to assess the relationship among blood pressure, ocular perfusion pressure and the presence of glaucoma.

Sixty percent of the subjects were diagnosed with hypertension for more than 5 years, and 32.4% had diabetes.

Adjustments were made for age, sex, diabetes, type of antihypertensive drugs used, time since diagnosis and IOP, and no relationship was found between the occurrence of glaucoma and systemic blood pressure or mean arterial blood pressure. There was an association between patients with high values of diastolic blood pressure of greater than 90 mm Hg or low values of ocular perfusion pressure less than 40 mm Hg with an increased risk for confirmed primary open-angle glaucoma.

“The findings of our cross-sectional study in hypertensive patients suggest that there is a close relationship between [ocular perfusion pressure] values and confirmed [primary open-angle glaucoma], providing further evidence of the vascular mechanism in glaucoma pathogenesis,” the study authors wrote. – by Robert Linnehan

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.