In the Journals

Glaucoma implant with scleral buckling effective for glaucoma, retinal detachment

Combined scleral buckling and Baerveldt implantation was an effective surgical approach in treatment of coexisting glaucoma and retinal detachment, according to a study.

The retrospective, consecutive, interventional case series included 30 eyes of 30 patients who underwent surgery with a scleral buckle and Baerveldt implant (Abbott Medical Optics).

Patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 included 21 patients who underwent a staged approach with placement of the Baerveldt implant plate without intraocular tube insertion. Group 2 included nine patients who underwent a non-staged approach with complete placement of the Baerveldt implant and tube insertion with the scleral buckling procedure.

IOP control had a 90% success rate at 12 months and an 80% success rate at 24 months. Mean follow-up was 27.7 months.

Thirteen of the patients in group 1 needed second-stage tube insertion at a mean of 7 months postoperatively. Mean IOP of these eyes plus the eyes in group 2 decreased from 31.1 mm Hg to 12.7 mm Hg, which was statistically significant (P < .0001).

The mean number of glaucoma medication decreased from 2.9 to 1.2, which was statistically significant (P < .001).

Combined scleral buckling and Baerveldt implantation was an effective surgical approach in treatment of coexisting glaucoma and retinal detachment, according to a study.

The retrospective, consecutive, interventional case series included 30 eyes of 30 patients who underwent surgery with a scleral buckle and Baerveldt implant (Abbott Medical Optics).

Patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 included 21 patients who underwent a staged approach with placement of the Baerveldt implant plate without intraocular tube insertion. Group 2 included nine patients who underwent a non-staged approach with complete placement of the Baerveldt implant and tube insertion with the scleral buckling procedure.

IOP control had a 90% success rate at 12 months and an 80% success rate at 24 months. Mean follow-up was 27.7 months.

Thirteen of the patients in group 1 needed second-stage tube insertion at a mean of 7 months postoperatively. Mean IOP of these eyes plus the eyes in group 2 decreased from 31.1 mm Hg to 12.7 mm Hg, which was statistically significant (P < .0001).

The mean number of glaucoma medication decreased from 2.9 to 1.2, which was statistically significant (P < .001).