Meeting News

Once-daily netarsudil generally safe, with minimal treatment-related adverse events

Inder Paul Singh

WASHINGTON — Once-daily netarsudil for patients with ocular hypertension or open-angle glaucoma was safe, with mild conjunctival hyperemia being the most frequently occurring ocular adverse event, according to a speaker here.

In a pooled analysis of four phase 3 trials comparing once-daily Rhopressa (netarsudil ophthalmic solution 0.02%, Aerie Pharmaceuticals) with twice-daily timolol, netarsudil had limited ocular adverse events and effects on heart rate change from baseline and was “generally safe and well tolerated,” Inder Paul Singh, MD, said at the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery annual meeting.

The pooled analysis included 839 patients who received once-daily netarsudil and 839 patients who received twice-daily timolol. Netarsudil had no effect on heart rate, while timolol significantly reduced mean heart rate by two to three beats per minute compared with baseline, Singh said.

The most common ocular adverse event in the netarsudil cohort was conjunctival hyperemia, affecting 54.4% of patients and leading to discontinuation in 6% of patients. Conjunctival hyperemia was graded as mild in 77.6% of netarsudil patients. It did not increase in severity with continued dosing in the affected patients, Singh said.

The results of this pooled study were similar to those seen in the individual ROCKET studies, he said. – by Robert Linnehan

 

Reference:

Singh IP. Pooled safety profile of once-daily netarsudil ophthalmic solution 0.02% in patients with ocular hypertension or open-angle glaucoma. Presented at: American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery annual meeting; April 13-17, 2018; Washington.

 

Disclosure: Singh reports he receives research funding from Aerie Pharmaceuticals, Glaukos, Bausch + Lomb/Valeant, Alcon, Allergan, Katena/IOP, Ellex and Ivantis; is a consultant for Glaukos, Bausch + Lomb/Valeant, Allergan and Ellex; and is a member of the speakers bureau for Bausch + Lomb/Valeant, Alcon, Allergan, Shire, Katena/IOP, Ellex and NovaBay. He reports the ROCKET studies were sponsored by Aerie Pharmaceuticals.

Inder Paul Singh

WASHINGTON — Once-daily netarsudil for patients with ocular hypertension or open-angle glaucoma was safe, with mild conjunctival hyperemia being the most frequently occurring ocular adverse event, according to a speaker here.

In a pooled analysis of four phase 3 trials comparing once-daily Rhopressa (netarsudil ophthalmic solution 0.02%, Aerie Pharmaceuticals) with twice-daily timolol, netarsudil had limited ocular adverse events and effects on heart rate change from baseline and was “generally safe and well tolerated,” Inder Paul Singh, MD, said at the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery annual meeting.

The pooled analysis included 839 patients who received once-daily netarsudil and 839 patients who received twice-daily timolol. Netarsudil had no effect on heart rate, while timolol significantly reduced mean heart rate by two to three beats per minute compared with baseline, Singh said.

The most common ocular adverse event in the netarsudil cohort was conjunctival hyperemia, affecting 54.4% of patients and leading to discontinuation in 6% of patients. Conjunctival hyperemia was graded as mild in 77.6% of netarsudil patients. It did not increase in severity with continued dosing in the affected patients, Singh said.

The results of this pooled study were similar to those seen in the individual ROCKET studies, he said. – by Robert Linnehan

 

Reference:

Singh IP. Pooled safety profile of once-daily netarsudil ophthalmic solution 0.02% in patients with ocular hypertension or open-angle glaucoma. Presented at: American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery annual meeting; April 13-17, 2018; Washington.

 

Disclosure: Singh reports he receives research funding from Aerie Pharmaceuticals, Glaukos, Bausch + Lomb/Valeant, Alcon, Allergan, Katena/IOP, Ellex and Ivantis; is a consultant for Glaukos, Bausch + Lomb/Valeant, Allergan and Ellex; and is a member of the speakers bureau for Bausch + Lomb/Valeant, Alcon, Allergan, Shire, Katena/IOP, Ellex and NovaBay. He reports the ROCKET studies were sponsored by Aerie Pharmaceuticals.

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