Meeting News

Drug delivery devices may be future of glaucoma therapy

MILAN — Drug delivery devices may relieve the burden of glaucoma treatment and increase compliance, according to one speaker.

“There are several technologies in the pipeline that are getting ready for us for drug delivery. It’s an exciting time. We have to get rid of preservatives and look at ways to improve adherence for patients,” E. Randy Craven, MD, said at the OSN Italy meeting.

E. Randy Craven

E. Randy Craven

Craven was personally involved in the trials that investigated some of the earlier devices. Anecortave acetate injections promised to provide long-lasting improvement of trabecular outflow, but trials were discontinued by Alcon due to unsatisfactory results. A punctal plug delivery system was tried with 13 consecutive versions but was too difficult to place and did not stay in place for a percentage of the patients. Research on nanoparticles and other applications of nanomedicine such as drug-eluting sutures is still ongoing.

The bimatoprost sustained-release implant by Allergan has positively completed phase 1/2 trials.

“A significant drop in IOP was observed in the first weeks after implantation with the 10-µg dose, which is equivalent to one drop of bimatoprost. Up to 26 weeks patient have sustained pressure reduction with reduced side effects as compared to the drops administered in the fellow eye. Approximately 80% of the patients said they would have the procedure again and would recommend it to someone else with their eye condition,” Craven said.

Other promising techniques are the bimatoprost ring, recently acquired by Allergan, which rests in the conjunctival fornix and provides sustained release of the drug for 6 months, the Ocusert pilocarpine system and drug-eluting contact lenses. – by Michela Cimberle

Reference:

Craven ER. Drug delivery for glaucoma. Presented at: OSN Italy; May 26-27, 2017; Milan.

Disclosure: Craven reports he is a consultant for Allergan, Alcon, Gore and Aqueous Biomedical.

MILAN — Drug delivery devices may relieve the burden of glaucoma treatment and increase compliance, according to one speaker.

“There are several technologies in the pipeline that are getting ready for us for drug delivery. It’s an exciting time. We have to get rid of preservatives and look at ways to improve adherence for patients,” E. Randy Craven, MD, said at the OSN Italy meeting.

E. Randy Craven

E. Randy Craven

Craven was personally involved in the trials that investigated some of the earlier devices. Anecortave acetate injections promised to provide long-lasting improvement of trabecular outflow, but trials were discontinued by Alcon due to unsatisfactory results. A punctal plug delivery system was tried with 13 consecutive versions but was too difficult to place and did not stay in place for a percentage of the patients. Research on nanoparticles and other applications of nanomedicine such as drug-eluting sutures is still ongoing.

The bimatoprost sustained-release implant by Allergan has positively completed phase 1/2 trials.

“A significant drop in IOP was observed in the first weeks after implantation with the 10-µg dose, which is equivalent to one drop of bimatoprost. Up to 26 weeks patient have sustained pressure reduction with reduced side effects as compared to the drops administered in the fellow eye. Approximately 80% of the patients said they would have the procedure again and would recommend it to someone else with their eye condition,” Craven said.

Other promising techniques are the bimatoprost ring, recently acquired by Allergan, which rests in the conjunctival fornix and provides sustained release of the drug for 6 months, the Ocusert pilocarpine system and drug-eluting contact lenses. – by Michela Cimberle

Reference:

Craven ER. Drug delivery for glaucoma. Presented at: OSN Italy; May 26-27, 2017; Milan.

Disclosure: Craven reports he is a consultant for Allergan, Alcon, Gore and Aqueous Biomedical.

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