Meeting News

Aberrometry provides wealth of information, improves patient education

Parag A. Majmudar

NEW ORLEANS — In-office aberrometry provides ophthalmologists with valuable patient information and can improve patient selection, according to a speaker here.

“Aberrometry provides a wealth of information. It’s very easy to obtain this data on a technical side. We can identify candidates for the right procedure. We can troubleshoot and have a nice way to involve the patients, engage them and help them understand what’s going on with their eyes,” Parag A. Majmudar, MD, said at Cornea Subspecialty Day preceding the American Academy of Ophthalmology meeting.

Aberrometry in daily clinical practice can identify the location of a problem and if it is in the cornea or somewhere else, presumably an internal aberration, he said.

“You can also identify good candidates for either LASIK, corneal refractive surgery or refractive lens exchange based on if someone has subtle lens changes,” he said.

Ophthalmologists can identify patients when they come in with complaints after various types of refractive surgery or multifocal lens surgery. The patients can be separated by the type of complaint they have subjectively with what is going on optically, he said.

“We might be able to associate blur or double vision to coma, starburst to trefoil, glare and halo, spherical aberration; we can actually see this happening in real time,” Majmudar said.

An aberrometer can also be used as a patient education tool. An ophthalmologist can show patients in real time what is going on with their vision and what they are seeing, which can help explain complex aberrations much easier, he said. – by Robert Linnehan

 

Reference:

Majmudar PA. Is aberrometry necessary? Presented at AAO Subspecialty Days; Nov. 10-11, 2017; New Orleans.

 

Disclosure: Majmudar reports no relevant financial disclosures.

Parag A. Majmudar

NEW ORLEANS — In-office aberrometry provides ophthalmologists with valuable patient information and can improve patient selection, according to a speaker here.

“Aberrometry provides a wealth of information. It’s very easy to obtain this data on a technical side. We can identify candidates for the right procedure. We can troubleshoot and have a nice way to involve the patients, engage them and help them understand what’s going on with their eyes,” Parag A. Majmudar, MD, said at Cornea Subspecialty Day preceding the American Academy of Ophthalmology meeting.

Aberrometry in daily clinical practice can identify the location of a problem and if it is in the cornea or somewhere else, presumably an internal aberration, he said.

“You can also identify good candidates for either LASIK, corneal refractive surgery or refractive lens exchange based on if someone has subtle lens changes,” he said.

Ophthalmologists can identify patients when they come in with complaints after various types of refractive surgery or multifocal lens surgery. The patients can be separated by the type of complaint they have subjectively with what is going on optically, he said.

“We might be able to associate blur or double vision to coma, starburst to trefoil, glare and halo, spherical aberration; we can actually see this happening in real time,” Majmudar said.

An aberrometer can also be used as a patient education tool. An ophthalmologist can show patients in real time what is going on with their vision and what they are seeing, which can help explain complex aberrations much easier, he said. – by Robert Linnehan

 

Reference:

Majmudar PA. Is aberrometry necessary? Presented at AAO Subspecialty Days; Nov. 10-11, 2017; New Orleans.

 

Disclosure: Majmudar reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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