In the JournalsPerspective

Pterygium prevalence linked to shorter axial length

The prevalence of pterygium was associated with short axial length and anterior chamber depth in a Chinese retrospective, hospital-based, cross-sectional study.

“In this study, an increasing trend was found in the prevalence of pterygium with the severity of hyperopia, which has a connection with short axial length,” the authors wrote.

The study compared anatomic characteristics of 114 eyes with pterygium and 407 without.

Hyperopia prevalence in the pterygium group was 81.6% vs. 65.1% in the non-pterygium group (P = .001). Eye size was statistically significantly shorter in the pterygium group, indicated by shorter mean axial length (23.1 mm vs. 24.2 mm, P < .001) and anterior chamber depth (2.9 cm vs. 3.1 cm, P = .001).

“Interestingly, hyperopia seemed to have an association with pterygium; however, stratied chi-square analysis showed that hyperopia was not a related factor; instead, it was just a consequence of short axial length,” the authors said.

The authors also suggested that stromal myofibroblasts or fibroblasts may “play a vital role in pterygium progression.” – by Erin T. Welsh

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

The prevalence of pterygium was associated with short axial length and anterior chamber depth in a Chinese retrospective, hospital-based, cross-sectional study.

“In this study, an increasing trend was found in the prevalence of pterygium with the severity of hyperopia, which has a connection with short axial length,” the authors wrote.

The study compared anatomic characteristics of 114 eyes with pterygium and 407 without.

Hyperopia prevalence in the pterygium group was 81.6% vs. 65.1% in the non-pterygium group (P = .001). Eye size was statistically significantly shorter in the pterygium group, indicated by shorter mean axial length (23.1 mm vs. 24.2 mm, P < .001) and anterior chamber depth (2.9 cm vs. 3.1 cm, P = .001).

“Interestingly, hyperopia seemed to have an association with pterygium; however, stratied chi-square analysis showed that hyperopia was not a related factor; instead, it was just a consequence of short axial length,” the authors said.

The authors also suggested that stromal myofibroblasts or fibroblasts may “play a vital role in pterygium progression.” – by Erin T. Welsh

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

    Perspective
    John A. Hovanesian

    John A. Hovanesian

    This study raises the question of whether pterygium is associated with short axial length. This is a new concept because the main epidemiological associations with pterygium have previously been living in proximity to the equator and a lifestyle that predisposes to UV exposure. The study population of more than 500 subjects all resided in Shanghai, which also raises questions about the applicability of these findings to a more global population.

    There is much we do not understand about collagen and its relationship with disease. In glaucoma, for example, we are still learning about how ocular elasticity relates to disease progression. Pterygium may be associated with disorders of collagen that also influence other factors such as axial length. That makes this study an interesting data point.

    • John A. Hovanesian, MD, FACS
    • OSN Cataract Surgery Section Editor

    Disclosures: Hovanesian reports no relevant financial disclosures.