New definition of dry eye disease recognizes its multifactorial nature

The TFOS DEWS II membership acknowledged the need to recognize the multifactorial nature of dry eye disease, which has led to a refined definition of the disease, wherein loss of homeostasis of the tear film is the central pathophysiological concept.

A survey of TFOS DEWS II members in late 2015 asked whether the original DEWS definition of dry eye disease should be changed. Of those who responded to the survey, 77% agreed the definition needed to be updated.

The TFOS DEWS II membership acknowledged the need to recognize the multifactorial nature of dry eye disease and refined the global dry eye definition to the following:

“Dry eye is a multifactorial disease of the ocular surface characterized by a loss of homeostasis of the tear film, and accompanied by ocular symptoms, in which tear film instability and hyperosmolarity, ocular surface inflammation and damage, and neurosensory abnormalities play etiological roles.”

The definition allows for consideration of non-obvious disease involving ocular surface signs without related symptoms.

Reference:

Craig JP, et al. Ocul Surf. 2017;doi:10.1016/j.jtos.2017.05.008

Disclosures: Craig reports she receives financial support from Oculeve, Allergan, Manuka Health NZ, E-Swin, CooperVision, Alcon, Optima Pharmaceuticals, OPSM NZ, Akorn and Medmont and is a consultant for Carl Zeiss Meditec and Eye Institute Auckland. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

The TFOS DEWS II membership acknowledged the need to recognize the multifactorial nature of dry eye disease, which has led to a refined definition of the disease, wherein loss of homeostasis of the tear film is the central pathophysiological concept.

A survey of TFOS DEWS II members in late 2015 asked whether the original DEWS definition of dry eye disease should be changed. Of those who responded to the survey, 77% agreed the definition needed to be updated.

The TFOS DEWS II membership acknowledged the need to recognize the multifactorial nature of dry eye disease and refined the global dry eye definition to the following:

“Dry eye is a multifactorial disease of the ocular surface characterized by a loss of homeostasis of the tear film, and accompanied by ocular symptoms, in which tear film instability and hyperosmolarity, ocular surface inflammation and damage, and neurosensory abnormalities play etiological roles.”

The definition allows for consideration of non-obvious disease involving ocular surface signs without related symptoms.

Reference:

Craig JP, et al. Ocul Surf. 2017;doi:10.1016/j.jtos.2017.05.008

Disclosures: Craig reports she receives financial support from Oculeve, Allergan, Manuka Health NZ, E-Swin, CooperVision, Alcon, Optima Pharmaceuticals, OPSM NZ, Akorn and Medmont and is a consultant for Carl Zeiss Meditec and Eye Institute Auckland. Please see the study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.