In the Journals

Corneal sensitivity decreased in keratoconus patients after corneal cross-linking

Use of corneal cross-linking resulted in reduced corneal sensitivity among patients with progressive keratoconus, according to a study.

The prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial included 72 eyes of 36 patients. Cross-linking surgery was performed on one eye, with the other eye used as a control. Corneal tactile sensitivity was analyzed at baseline and at 7, 30, 90 and 180 days after surgery.

Prior to cross-linking surgery, median corneal tactile sensitivity was 52.5 mm. Median sensitivity was 20 mm by day 7, 32.5 mm by day 30, 40 mm by day 90, and 45 mm by day 180. Measurements at each of the five time points were considered statistically significant, according to the authors (P < 0.001). No statistically significant differences were seen in the control group.

Disclosure: The study authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Use of corneal cross-linking resulted in reduced corneal sensitivity among patients with progressive keratoconus, according to a study.

The prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial included 72 eyes of 36 patients. Cross-linking surgery was performed on one eye, with the other eye used as a control. Corneal tactile sensitivity was analyzed at baseline and at 7, 30, 90 and 180 days after surgery.

Prior to cross-linking surgery, median corneal tactile sensitivity was 52.5 mm. Median sensitivity was 20 mm by day 7, 32.5 mm by day 30, 40 mm by day 90, and 45 mm by day 180. Measurements at each of the five time points were considered statistically significant, according to the authors (P < 0.001). No statistically significant differences were seen in the control group.

Disclosure: The study authors report no relevant financial disclosures.