Meeting News

Unregulated cosmetics contribute to ocular surface disease

Laura M. Periman at Hawaiian Eye 2020
Laura M. Periman

KOLOA, Hawaii — A person who uses beauty products containing prostaglandins around their eyes and eyelashes may be spending a lot of money to contribute to their own dry eye, Laura M. Periman, MD, said at Hawaiian Eye 2020.

“Just because it looks good doesn’t mean it’s good for you,” Periman said.

One-third of over-the-counter eyelash growth serums contain synthetic prostaglandins, “and we all know the deleterious effects of prostaglandins. These products retail anywhere from $100 to $175,” she said.

In glaucoma patients on prostaglandin medication, 91.7% were reported to have meibomian gland disease compared with 58.3% of patients taking other classes of drugs.

There is “clear association” between prostaglandins and ocular side effects, including dry eye, skin hyperpigmentation, iris discoloration and orbital fat atrophy, she said, and these same side effects are possible when the over-the-counter products, which are not regulated for safety, are used.

Further contributing to dry eye disease is the altered eyelash-length to lid-length ratio, which reduces the eyelid’s ability to deflect wind, debris and allergens, she said.

Not just eyelid lengtheners, but also eye makeup remover is “chock full of ocular surface unfriendly ingredients, including BAK, which everybody knows is super harsh on the ocular surface,” she said.

“We need better, more ocular surface friendly preservatives,” she said. “Cosmetics are unregulated. Patients are doing things to themselves all the time that get in the way of having a successful dry eye patient.” – by Patricia Nale, ELS

 

Reference: Periman LM. Dry eyelash whiplash. Presented at: Hawaiian Eye 2020; Jan. 18-24, 2020; Koloa, Hawaii.

Disclosure: Periman reports financial disclosures with Alcon, Allergan, Eyedetec, Eyevance, Horizon, Johnson & Johnson, Lumenis, Novartis, Olympic Ophthalmics, ScienceBasedHealth, Sun Pharmaceuticals, TearLab and Visant.

Laura M. Periman at Hawaiian Eye 2020
Laura M. Periman

KOLOA, Hawaii — A person who uses beauty products containing prostaglandins around their eyes and eyelashes may be spending a lot of money to contribute to their own dry eye, Laura M. Periman, MD, said at Hawaiian Eye 2020.

“Just because it looks good doesn’t mean it’s good for you,” Periman said.

One-third of over-the-counter eyelash growth serums contain synthetic prostaglandins, “and we all know the deleterious effects of prostaglandins. These products retail anywhere from $100 to $175,” she said.

In glaucoma patients on prostaglandin medication, 91.7% were reported to have meibomian gland disease compared with 58.3% of patients taking other classes of drugs.

There is “clear association” between prostaglandins and ocular side effects, including dry eye, skin hyperpigmentation, iris discoloration and orbital fat atrophy, she said, and these same side effects are possible when the over-the-counter products, which are not regulated for safety, are used.

Further contributing to dry eye disease is the altered eyelash-length to lid-length ratio, which reduces the eyelid’s ability to deflect wind, debris and allergens, she said.

Not just eyelid lengtheners, but also eye makeup remover is “chock full of ocular surface unfriendly ingredients, including BAK, which everybody knows is super harsh on the ocular surface,” she said.

“We need better, more ocular surface friendly preservatives,” she said. “Cosmetics are unregulated. Patients are doing things to themselves all the time that get in the way of having a successful dry eye patient.” – by Patricia Nale, ELS

 

Reference: Periman LM. Dry eyelash whiplash. Presented at: Hawaiian Eye 2020; Jan. 18-24, 2020; Koloa, Hawaii.

Disclosure: Periman reports financial disclosures with Alcon, Allergan, Eyedetec, Eyevance, Horizon, Johnson & Johnson, Lumenis, Novartis, Olympic Ophthalmics, ScienceBasedHealth, Sun Pharmaceuticals, TearLab and Visant.

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