Ocular Bandage Gel shows potential for treating corneal epithelial defects

EyeGate Pharmaceuticals' Ocular Bandage Gel demonstrated potential for use in treating corneal epithelial defects in a study of patients undergoing photorefractive keratectomy, according to preliminary results released by the company.

The study, which enrolled 45 patients undergoing bilateral PRK, compared two Ocular Bandage Gel dosing regimens to the current standard of care, a bandage contact lens and artificial tears.

On the fourth postoperative day, 100% of eyes treated in both Ocular Bandage Gel dosing regimens were healed, whereas in the standard of care group 87% were healed. In addition, the maximum wound size was 67% and 49% smaller in the two study groups than in the standard of care comparator group on day 2 postoperatively.

“This is the first time I have seen a product heal an epithelial defect without a bandage contact lens. Working with PRK patients creates an ideal epithelial defect challenge model to demonstrate the potential to heal all types of ocular surface wounds,” Daniel S. Durrie, MD, said in the release.

 

EyeGate Pharmaceuticals' Ocular Bandage Gel demonstrated potential for use in treating corneal epithelial defects in a study of patients undergoing photorefractive keratectomy, according to preliminary results released by the company.

The study, which enrolled 45 patients undergoing bilateral PRK, compared two Ocular Bandage Gel dosing regimens to the current standard of care, a bandage contact lens and artificial tears.

On the fourth postoperative day, 100% of eyes treated in both Ocular Bandage Gel dosing regimens were healed, whereas in the standard of care group 87% were healed. In addition, the maximum wound size was 67% and 49% smaller in the two study groups than in the standard of care comparator group on day 2 postoperatively.

“This is the first time I have seen a product heal an epithelial defect without a bandage contact lens. Working with PRK patients creates an ideal epithelial defect challenge model to demonstrate the potential to heal all types of ocular surface wounds,” Daniel S. Durrie, MD, said in the release.