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DREAM results do not support omega-3 supplementation for dry eye disease

Penny Asbell, MD, headshot
Penny Asbell

WASHINGTON — The results of the 1-year Dry Eye Assessment and Management trial found insufficient evidence to support patients taking oral omega-3 supplements to reduce the signs and symptoms of dry eye disease, according to a speaker here.

“This NEI-supported clinical trial shows that oral omega-3 is no better than placebo in relieving signs and symptoms of dry eye disease,” Penny Asbell, MD, study chair of the DREAM trial, said during Cornea Day at the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery annual meeting.

The DREAM trial is the first large-scale, real-world, double-masked, randomized, multicenter clinical trial to study the long-term effects of omega-3 supplementation for symptomatic dry eye disease. The trial included 535 patients randomized into a treatment group or a placebo group.

The active supplement group, two-thirds of the patient cohort, received a daily dose of 3,000 mg of marine-derived omega-3 fatty acid, 2,000 mg of eicosapentaenoic acid and 1,000 mg of docosahexaenoic acid. The placebo group, one-third of the patient cohort, received 5,000 mg of olive oil, according to Asbell.

Patients who received omega-3 experienced a 13.9-point mean reduction in Ocular Surface Disease Index score at 12 months compared with a 12.5-point mean reduction in OSDI score in patients who received placebo, which was not a clinically significant difference, according to Asbell.

There were no clinically significant treatment differences between the active and placebo groups for OSDI scores, Brief Ocular Discomfort Index scores, SF-36 scores, four key signs of dry eye disease, dry eye disease treatment, and serious or nonserious adverse events, Asbell said. by Robert Linnehan

 

Reference:

Asbell P. Featured lecture: Role of nutritional supplements in dry eye disease. Presented at: American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery annual meeting; April 13-17, 2018; Washington.

 

Disclosures: Asbell reports she is a consultant for Allergan, Kao Corporation, Medscape, Novartis, Perrigo, Regeneron, Santen, Scientia, Senju, Shire, Valeant and Virtuoso; and receives full or partial research funding from MC2 Therapeutics, Novartis and Valeant. She reports the DREAM trial received contributions, discounts or assistance from Access Business Group LLC, Compounded Solutions in Pharmacy, Immco Diagnostics, Leiter’s, Oculus, RPS Diagnostics, TearLab and TearScience.

Penny Asbell, MD, headshot
Penny Asbell

WASHINGTON — The results of the 1-year Dry Eye Assessment and Management trial found insufficient evidence to support patients taking oral omega-3 supplements to reduce the signs and symptoms of dry eye disease, according to a speaker here.

“This NEI-supported clinical trial shows that oral omega-3 is no better than placebo in relieving signs and symptoms of dry eye disease,” Penny Asbell, MD, study chair of the DREAM trial, said during Cornea Day at the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery annual meeting.

The DREAM trial is the first large-scale, real-world, double-masked, randomized, multicenter clinical trial to study the long-term effects of omega-3 supplementation for symptomatic dry eye disease. The trial included 535 patients randomized into a treatment group or a placebo group.

The active supplement group, two-thirds of the patient cohort, received a daily dose of 3,000 mg of marine-derived omega-3 fatty acid, 2,000 mg of eicosapentaenoic acid and 1,000 mg of docosahexaenoic acid. The placebo group, one-third of the patient cohort, received 5,000 mg of olive oil, according to Asbell.

Patients who received omega-3 experienced a 13.9-point mean reduction in Ocular Surface Disease Index score at 12 months compared with a 12.5-point mean reduction in OSDI score in patients who received placebo, which was not a clinically significant difference, according to Asbell.

There were no clinically significant treatment differences between the active and placebo groups for OSDI scores, Brief Ocular Discomfort Index scores, SF-36 scores, four key signs of dry eye disease, dry eye disease treatment, and serious or nonserious adverse events, Asbell said. by Robert Linnehan

 

Reference:

Asbell P. Featured lecture: Role of nutritional supplements in dry eye disease. Presented at: American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery annual meeting; April 13-17, 2018; Washington.

 

Disclosures: Asbell reports she is a consultant for Allergan, Kao Corporation, Medscape, Novartis, Perrigo, Regeneron, Santen, Scientia, Senju, Shire, Valeant and Virtuoso; and receives full or partial research funding from MC2 Therapeutics, Novartis and Valeant. She reports the DREAM trial received contributions, discounts or assistance from Access Business Group LLC, Compounded Solutions in Pharmacy, Immco Diagnostics, Leiter’s, Oculus, RPS Diagnostics, TearLab and TearScience.

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