Meeting News

Toric IOL implantation has improved, but adjustable lenses may change strategies

David Chang

NEW ORLEANS — Current preoperative and intraoperative technologies are enabling better toric IOL implantation outcomes, but the potential FDA approval of a new type of lens may change the procedure, according to a speaker here.

“We have all these great technologies right now. They’re giving us better results than we’ve ever gotten, but if we did get adjustable lenses, all of a sudden most of this becomes superfluous because we’re just going to actually treat the refraction at the end,” David F. Chang, MD, said at Cornea Subspecialty Day preceding the American Academy of Ophthalmology meeting.

Preoperative diagnostic technologies such as toric IOL calculations and formulations, keratometry and topography, and intraoperative technologies such as toric IOL design, axis marking and IOL positioning are enabling better implantation outcomes for patients. According to a study published in the Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery in 2015, the Barrett toric calculator was “actually just as good, ” with no advantage for direct measurements when a “good theoretical model, such as the Barrett,” is available, Chang said.

However, if the FDA approves adjustable lenses, some strategies and technologies will have to change. Adjustable lenses will allow surgeons to adjust the lens according to the refraction 3 weeks postoperatively, he said.

“I think this is going to be imminent, in my opinion, and it may be approved before the end of the year,” Chang said. – by Robert Linnehan

 

Reference:

Chang DF. How many technologies does it take to implant a toric IOL? Presented at AAO Subspecialty Days; Nov. 10-11, 2017; New Orleans.

 

Disclosure: Chang reports he is a consultant with Carl Zeiss Meditec, Mynosys and RxSight.

David Chang

NEW ORLEANS — Current preoperative and intraoperative technologies are enabling better toric IOL implantation outcomes, but the potential FDA approval of a new type of lens may change the procedure, according to a speaker here.

“We have all these great technologies right now. They’re giving us better results than we’ve ever gotten, but if we did get adjustable lenses, all of a sudden most of this becomes superfluous because we’re just going to actually treat the refraction at the end,” David F. Chang, MD, said at Cornea Subspecialty Day preceding the American Academy of Ophthalmology meeting.

Preoperative diagnostic technologies such as toric IOL calculations and formulations, keratometry and topography, and intraoperative technologies such as toric IOL design, axis marking and IOL positioning are enabling better implantation outcomes for patients. According to a study published in the Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery in 2015, the Barrett toric calculator was “actually just as good, ” with no advantage for direct measurements when a “good theoretical model, such as the Barrett,” is available, Chang said.

However, if the FDA approves adjustable lenses, some strategies and technologies will have to change. Adjustable lenses will allow surgeons to adjust the lens according to the refraction 3 weeks postoperatively, he said.

“I think this is going to be imminent, in my opinion, and it may be approved before the end of the year,” Chang said. – by Robert Linnehan

 

Reference:

Chang DF. How many technologies does it take to implant a toric IOL? Presented at AAO Subspecialty Days; Nov. 10-11, 2017; New Orleans.

 

Disclosure: Chang reports he is a consultant with Carl Zeiss Meditec, Mynosys and RxSight.

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