Meeting News

Neurostimulation reduces ocular pain, dryness

SAN FRANCISCO —Noninvasive internasal neurostimulation with TrueTear increased tear volume as well as reduced ocular dryness and pain intensity in patients with dry eye symptoms, according to a presentation at the American Academy of Ophthalmology annual meeting.

“There’s limited literature on the effects of TrueTear on ocular pain,” Monika Farhangi Oskuei, MD, of Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, department of ophthalmology, University of Miami, said in her presentation.

In their study, the investigators examined which factors of TrueTear neurostimulation were associated with dry eye symptom reduction in 86 patients who underwent an ocular surface exam then one session of intranasal neurostimulation. The researchers evaluated objective change in tear volume measured vial phenol red test (PRT) and subjective change in sensations of dryness and ocular pain measured on a 0-10 Numerical Rating Scale (NRS).

Overall, 75 patients successfully completed one intranasal neurostimulation session.

After stimulation, Oskuei reported that tear volume increased on average 13.4+8 mm (P < .001) while dryness and ocular pain intensity decreased on average –2.85+2.79 and –1.48+2.41 (P <.001). Low baseline tear volume and absence of autoimmune disease predicted a greater increase in tear volume, while lower baseline pain and dryness scores, younger age and normal ocular anatomy predicted a greater reduction in dryness and pain, according to the presentation.

“TrueTear decreased pain in a separate mechanism that increased tear volume,” Oskuei said. “We think that TrueTear works the same as [transcutaneous electrical stimulation], which can decrease the pain by two mechanisms: one is through increasing endogenous opioids in the body and the other one is through the Gate-Control Theory.” – by Savannah Demko

Reference:

Oskuei MF, et al. Effect of noninvasive intranasal neurostimulation on tear volume, dryness and ocular pain by dry eye subtype. Presented at: American Academy of Ophthalmology annual meeting; Oct. 11-15, 2019; San Francisco.

Disclosure: Oskuei reports no relevant financial disclosures.

SAN FRANCISCO —Noninvasive internasal neurostimulation with TrueTear increased tear volume as well as reduced ocular dryness and pain intensity in patients with dry eye symptoms, according to a presentation at the American Academy of Ophthalmology annual meeting.

“There’s limited literature on the effects of TrueTear on ocular pain,” Monika Farhangi Oskuei, MD, of Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, department of ophthalmology, University of Miami, said in her presentation.

In their study, the investigators examined which factors of TrueTear neurostimulation were associated with dry eye symptom reduction in 86 patients who underwent an ocular surface exam then one session of intranasal neurostimulation. The researchers evaluated objective change in tear volume measured vial phenol red test (PRT) and subjective change in sensations of dryness and ocular pain measured on a 0-10 Numerical Rating Scale (NRS).

Overall, 75 patients successfully completed one intranasal neurostimulation session.

After stimulation, Oskuei reported that tear volume increased on average 13.4+8 mm (P < .001) while dryness and ocular pain intensity decreased on average –2.85+2.79 and –1.48+2.41 (P <.001). Low baseline tear volume and absence of autoimmune disease predicted a greater increase in tear volume, while lower baseline pain and dryness scores, younger age and normal ocular anatomy predicted a greater reduction in dryness and pain, according to the presentation.

“TrueTear decreased pain in a separate mechanism that increased tear volume,” Oskuei said. “We think that TrueTear works the same as [transcutaneous electrical stimulation], which can decrease the pain by two mechanisms: one is through increasing endogenous opioids in the body and the other one is through the Gate-Control Theory.” – by Savannah Demko

Reference:

Oskuei MF, et al. Effect of noninvasive intranasal neurostimulation on tear volume, dryness and ocular pain by dry eye subtype. Presented at: American Academy of Ophthalmology annual meeting; Oct. 11-15, 2019; San Francisco.

Disclosure: Oskuei reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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