Meeting NewsFrom OSN Europe

Study shows advantages of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery

Pajic
Brigitte Pajic-Eggspuehler

BELGRADE, Serbia — Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery with the Femto LDV Z8 laser from Ziemer offers the advantages of repeatable and precise outcomes, best placement of the capsulotomy and optimized surgical planning with the patient in one position from the beginning to end of surgery, according to one speaker.

“The operating time and workflow can be optimized and continuously improve with experience. We are now able to perform four to five FLACS per hour,” Brigitte Pajic-Eggspuehler, MD, said at the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons winter meeting.

In a prospective study, 130 eyes of 130 patients were treated with either femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) or conventional phaco. In the FLACS group, cataract grade density was higher, but the phaco time was lower. The 5-mm capsulorrhexis was more consistently and precisely achieved in the FLACS group, with significantly lower standard deviation. Visual rehabilitation occurred significantly faster on the first postoperative day.

“The overall surgery time was on average 1 minute more in the FLACS group, but experience made it progressively shorter. The time we lost for the paracentesis, capsulorrhexis and main incision, we regained during phacoemulsification and IOL implantation. The main incision is customized by the laser, and immediate insertion of the lens is possible. Irrigation and aspiration times were comparable. We also have to handle fewer instruments, and this potentially saves time,” Pajic-Eggspuehler said. – by Michela Cimberle

Reference:

Pajic-Eggspuehler B, et al. A prospective study with high-frequency femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery vs. conventional cataract surgery by clinical outcome and physical properties. Presented at the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons winter meeting; Feb. 9-11, 2018; Belgrade, Serbia.

Disclosure: Pajic-Eggspuehler reports no relevant financial disclosures.

Pajic
Brigitte Pajic-Eggspuehler

BELGRADE, Serbia — Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery with the Femto LDV Z8 laser from Ziemer offers the advantages of repeatable and precise outcomes, best placement of the capsulotomy and optimized surgical planning with the patient in one position from the beginning to end of surgery, according to one speaker.

“The operating time and workflow can be optimized and continuously improve with experience. We are now able to perform four to five FLACS per hour,” Brigitte Pajic-Eggspuehler, MD, said at the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons winter meeting.

In a prospective study, 130 eyes of 130 patients were treated with either femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) or conventional phaco. In the FLACS group, cataract grade density was higher, but the phaco time was lower. The 5-mm capsulorrhexis was more consistently and precisely achieved in the FLACS group, with significantly lower standard deviation. Visual rehabilitation occurred significantly faster on the first postoperative day.

“The overall surgery time was on average 1 minute more in the FLACS group, but experience made it progressively shorter. The time we lost for the paracentesis, capsulorrhexis and main incision, we regained during phacoemulsification and IOL implantation. The main incision is customized by the laser, and immediate insertion of the lens is possible. Irrigation and aspiration times were comparable. We also have to handle fewer instruments, and this potentially saves time,” Pajic-Eggspuehler said. – by Michela Cimberle

Reference:

Pajic-Eggspuehler B, et al. A prospective study with high-frequency femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery vs. conventional cataract surgery by clinical outcome and physical properties. Presented at the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons winter meeting; Feb. 9-11, 2018; Belgrade, Serbia.

Disclosure: Pajic-Eggspuehler reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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