In the Journals

Less surgically induced astigmatism seen with MICS

Patients with age-related cataracts who underwent microincision cataract surgery had less short-term and long-term surgically induced astigmatism compared with patients who underwent standard-incision cataract surgery.

Researchers conducted a meta-analysis of 11 randomized control trials. The analysis included 550 eyes that underwent MICS and 548 eyes that underwent standard-incision cataract surgery. Outcomes such as surgically induced astigmatism, effective phacoemulsification time, central corneal thickness, endothelial cell count, endothelial cell count loss and average ultrasonic energy were compared between the two cohorts.

No statistically significant differences were found in effective phacoemulsification time, central corneal thickness, endothelial cell count and endothelial cell count loss percentage between the two cohorts. There was a statistically significant difference in average ultrasonic energy between the groups of eyes.

Surgically induced astigmatism was evaluated at 1 day, 7 days, 30 days and 90 days after surgery, and eyes that underwent MICS experienced lower short-term and long-term rates of surgically induced astigmatism than eyes that underwent standard-incision cataract surgery. The differences were statistically significant.

The differences in safety and time required for surgery were not statistically significant between the two groups. – by Robert Linnehan

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

Patients with age-related cataracts who underwent microincision cataract surgery had less short-term and long-term surgically induced astigmatism compared with patients who underwent standard-incision cataract surgery.

Researchers conducted a meta-analysis of 11 randomized control trials. The analysis included 550 eyes that underwent MICS and 548 eyes that underwent standard-incision cataract surgery. Outcomes such as surgically induced astigmatism, effective phacoemulsification time, central corneal thickness, endothelial cell count, endothelial cell count loss and average ultrasonic energy were compared between the two cohorts.

No statistically significant differences were found in effective phacoemulsification time, central corneal thickness, endothelial cell count and endothelial cell count loss percentage between the two cohorts. There was a statistically significant difference in average ultrasonic energy between the groups of eyes.

Surgically induced astigmatism was evaluated at 1 day, 7 days, 30 days and 90 days after surgery, and eyes that underwent MICS experienced lower short-term and long-term rates of surgically induced astigmatism than eyes that underwent standard-incision cataract surgery. The differences were statistically significant.

The differences in safety and time required for surgery were not statistically significant between the two groups. – by Robert Linnehan

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.