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Adaptive fluidics with cloud-based data collection can improve phaco surgeries

SAN DIEGO — Adaptive fluidics, a mechanism that facilitates nuclear disassembly with enhanced safety, can lead to clearer corneas on postoperative day 1, according to a speaker.

“Adaptive fluidics is a novel system that enhances our ability to remove nuclei without having post-occlusion surge and risks. It has benefits in shallow chambers, patients with posterior pressure and flaccid capsules,” Mitchell C. Shultz, MD, said at the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery annual meeting.

Shultz reported on his use of adaptive fluidics during traditional cataract surgery across varying nuclear densities in 136 eyes between November 2018 and February 2019. Surgical data from each case were uploaded from the Stellaris Elite (Bausch + Lomb) to the eyeTELLIGENCE cloud-based parameter database (Bausch + Lomb). The system enables surgeons to track data and performance, and to pool data to determine what best parameters are for future surgeries, he said.

Adaptive fluidics increases chamber stability by increasing infusion pressure during occlusion to prevent chamber collapse after post-occlusion surge, Shultz said.

When using adaptive fluidics, soft density nuclei required an average of 12.18% phaco energy and moderate density nuclei required 13.27% compared with 18.74% average phaco energy for denser nuclei, he said.

Effective phaco time is also much less in soft and moderate density nuclei. Soft density nuclei required an average of 0.35 seconds, and medium density nuclei required 0.82 seconds. Denser nuclei required 10 times the amount of phaco time, a 4.72 second average, when compared with soft nuclei, he said. – by Robert Linnehan

Reference:

Shultz M. Comparative analysis of dual linear Venturi phacoemulsification with novel adaptive fluidics system in traditional phacoemulsification over various nuclear densities. Presented at: American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery annual meeting; May 3-7, 2019; San Diego.

Disclosure: Shultz reports he is a consultant for Bausch + Lomb.

SAN DIEGO — Adaptive fluidics, a mechanism that facilitates nuclear disassembly with enhanced safety, can lead to clearer corneas on postoperative day 1, according to a speaker.

“Adaptive fluidics is a novel system that enhances our ability to remove nuclei without having post-occlusion surge and risks. It has benefits in shallow chambers, patients with posterior pressure and flaccid capsules,” Mitchell C. Shultz, MD, said at the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery annual meeting.

Shultz reported on his use of adaptive fluidics during traditional cataract surgery across varying nuclear densities in 136 eyes between November 2018 and February 2019. Surgical data from each case were uploaded from the Stellaris Elite (Bausch + Lomb) to the eyeTELLIGENCE cloud-based parameter database (Bausch + Lomb). The system enables surgeons to track data and performance, and to pool data to determine what best parameters are for future surgeries, he said.

Adaptive fluidics increases chamber stability by increasing infusion pressure during occlusion to prevent chamber collapse after post-occlusion surge, Shultz said.

When using adaptive fluidics, soft density nuclei required an average of 12.18% phaco energy and moderate density nuclei required 13.27% compared with 18.74% average phaco energy for denser nuclei, he said.

Effective phaco time is also much less in soft and moderate density nuclei. Soft density nuclei required an average of 0.35 seconds, and medium density nuclei required 0.82 seconds. Denser nuclei required 10 times the amount of phaco time, a 4.72 second average, when compared with soft nuclei, he said. – by Robert Linnehan

Reference:

Shultz M. Comparative analysis of dual linear Venturi phacoemulsification with novel adaptive fluidics system in traditional phacoemulsification over various nuclear densities. Presented at: American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery annual meeting; May 3-7, 2019; San Diego.

Disclosure: Shultz reports he is a consultant for Bausch + Lomb.

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