IC-8 small aperture IOL maintains functionality

Vukich_John80X106
John A. Vukich

SAN DIEGO — Patients who received an IC-8 IOL in one eye and an aspheric monofocal IOL in the other reported very good binocular uncorrected visual acuity for far, intermediate and near distances, according to a speaker here.

“These patients achieved and maintained excellent distance [vision] and the IOL performed well up to a diopter-and-a-half,” John A. Vukich, MD, said at the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery annual meeting.

In a retrospective chart review, researchers evaluated 64 patients who received an IC-8 IOL and an aspheric monofocal IOL who presented at a single long-term follow-up visit. The mean follow-up time was 31 months.

Target refraction for the IC-8 eye was –0.75 D and plano for the monofocal eye.

“At two-and-a-half years, there is no loss, there is no tachyphylaxis, there is no loss of negative neuroaccommodation or neuroadaptation, being that the pinhole effect doesn’t go away,” Vukich said. “In theory there was some concern that that might be the case, but we just simply haven’t seen it.”

The IC-8 IOL tolerated up to 1.5 D of corneal astigmatism at the long-term visit, Vukich said, with no difference at uncorrected distance or intermediate vision, and minimal difference at near.

Subjective symptoms such as blurry vision, dryness, glare and halo, were mild at final follow-up, with 94% of patients reporting they would undergo the procedure again.

Vukich said retinal imaging is possible with few differences noted between the IC-8 IOL and monofocal IOL implanted eyes. As well, patients have undergone successful vitrectomy, membrane peeling, fluid exchange and cryotherapy without issue after receiving the IOL. – by Robert Linnehan

 

Reference: Vukich JA. Evaluation of long-term visual performance and stability of the IC-8 small aperture IOL. Presented at: American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery annual meeting; May 3-7, 2019; San Diego.
Disclosure: Vukich reports he is a consultant for AcuFocus.

 

Vukich_John80X106
John A. Vukich

SAN DIEGO — Patients who received an IC-8 IOL in one eye and an aspheric monofocal IOL in the other reported very good binocular uncorrected visual acuity for far, intermediate and near distances, according to a speaker here.

“These patients achieved and maintained excellent distance [vision] and the IOL performed well up to a diopter-and-a-half,” John A. Vukich, MD, said at the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery annual meeting.

In a retrospective chart review, researchers evaluated 64 patients who received an IC-8 IOL and an aspheric monofocal IOL who presented at a single long-term follow-up visit. The mean follow-up time was 31 months.

Target refraction for the IC-8 eye was –0.75 D and plano for the monofocal eye.

“At two-and-a-half years, there is no loss, there is no tachyphylaxis, there is no loss of negative neuroaccommodation or neuroadaptation, being that the pinhole effect doesn’t go away,” Vukich said. “In theory there was some concern that that might be the case, but we just simply haven’t seen it.”

The IC-8 IOL tolerated up to 1.5 D of corneal astigmatism at the long-term visit, Vukich said, with no difference at uncorrected distance or intermediate vision, and minimal difference at near.

Subjective symptoms such as blurry vision, dryness, glare and halo, were mild at final follow-up, with 94% of patients reporting they would undergo the procedure again.

Vukich said retinal imaging is possible with few differences noted between the IC-8 IOL and monofocal IOL implanted eyes. As well, patients have undergone successful vitrectomy, membrane peeling, fluid exchange and cryotherapy without issue after receiving the IOL. – by Robert Linnehan

 

Reference: Vukich JA. Evaluation of long-term visual performance and stability of the IC-8 small aperture IOL. Presented at: American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery annual meeting; May 3-7, 2019; San Diego.
Disclosure: Vukich reports he is a consultant for AcuFocus.

 

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