Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services

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Psychopharmacology 

Personalized Drug Therapy with Pharmacogenetics—Part 2: Pharmadynamics

Robert H. Howland, MD

  • Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services. 2006;44(2):13-16
  • Posted February 1, 2006

Abstract

Genetic differences among patients are likely to contribute to differences in their response to psychotropic medications, as well as their risk of developing adverse effects (Malhotra, Murphy, & Kennedy, 2004). The term pharmacogenetics refers to the use of molecular genetic approaches to investigate differences in drug response and tolerability. One approach to understanding pharmacogenetic differences is through the study of pharmacokinetics, which was discussed in last month’s Psychopharmacology article (Howland, 2006). The other main approach is through the study of pharmacodynamics (Evans & McLeod, 2003).

Dr. Howland is Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The author discloses that he has no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Robert H. Howland, MD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, 3811 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213; e-mail: HowlandRH@upmc.edu.…

EXCERPT

Genetic differences among patients are likely to contribute to differences in their response to psychotropic medications, as well as their risk of developing adverse effects (Malhotra, Murphy, & Kennedy, 2004). The term pharmacogenetics refers to the use of molecular genetic approaches to investigate differences in drug response and tolerability. One approach to understanding pharmacogenetic differences is through the study of pharmacokinetics, which was discussed in last month’s Psychopharmacology article (Howland, 2006). The other main approach is through the study of pharmacodynamics (Evans & McLeod, 2003).

AUTHOR

Dr. Howland is Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The author discloses that he has no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Robert H. Howland, MD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, 3811 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213; e-mail: HowlandRH@upmc.edu.

Authors

Dr. Howland is Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The author discloses that he has no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Robert H. Howland, MD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, 3811 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213; e-mail: HowlandRH@upmc.edu.

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