Major Article 

Impact of Interprofessional Simulation on Nursing Students' Attitudes Toward Teamwork and Collaboration

Linda Krueger, EdD, RN; Kim Ernstmeyer, MSN, RN, APN-BC, CHSE; Ellen Kirking, PhD, RN

Abstract

Background:

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of a multipatient, interprofessional simulation session on nursing students' attitudes toward nurse–physician collaboration using the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician–Nurse Collaboration.

Method:

Final-semester nursing students, along with medical resident and students from other health programs, participated in a simulation exercise that included a period of prebriefing, simulation, and debriefing. Participants completed pre- and postsimulation surveys to assess the impact on collaboration.

Results:

In total, 268 nursing students completed the survey. Participants had a more positive attitude toward nurse–physician collaboration following the simulation event, compared with prior to it. Significant differences between male and female nursing students were found on mean postsimulation scores and for three of the four subscales of the tool.

Conclusion:

Interprofessional simulation may be an effective way to enhance collaborative relationships, which ultimately may influence patient safety and quality of care. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(6):321–327.]

Authors

Dr. Krueger is Dean of Nursing, Bryant & Stratton College, Milwaukee, Ms. Ernstmeyer is Program Director, and Dr. Kirking is Nursing Instructor, Department of Nursing, Chippewa Valley Technical College, Eau Claire, Wisconsin.

The authors have disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise.

Address correspondence to Linda Krueger, EdD, RN, Dean of Nursing, Bryant & Stratton College, 10950 W. Potter Road, Wauwatosa, WI 53226; e-mail: lmkrueger@bryantstratton.edu.

Received: June 10, 2016
Accepted: January 19, 2017

10.3928/01484834-20170518-02

Background:

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of a multipatient, interprofessional simulation session on nursing students' attitudes toward nurse–physician collaboration using the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician–Nurse Collaboration.

Method:

Final-semester nursing students, along with medical resident and students from other health programs, participated in a simulation exercise that included a period of prebriefing, simulation, and debriefing. Participants completed pre- and postsimulation surveys to assess the impact on collaboration.

Results:

In total, 268 nursing students completed the survey. Participants had a more positive attitude toward nurse–physician collaboration following the simulation event, compared with prior to it. Significant differences between male and female nursing students were found on mean postsimulation scores and for three of the four subscales of the tool.

Conclusion:

Interprofessional simulation may be an effective way to enhance collaborative relationships, which ultimately may influence patient safety and quality of care. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(6):321–327.]

Dr. Krueger is Dean of Nursing, Bryant & Stratton College, Milwaukee, Ms. Ernstmeyer is Program Director, and Dr. Kirking is Nursing Instructor, Department of Nursing, Chippewa Valley Technical College, Eau Claire, Wisconsin.

The authors have disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise.

Address correspondence to Linda Krueger, EdD, RN, Dean of Nursing, Bryant & Stratton College, 10950 W. Potter Road, Wauwatosa, WI 53226; e-mail: lmkrueger@bryantstratton.edu.

Received: June 10, 2016
Accepted: January 19, 2017
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