Major Article 

Development and Psychometric Assessment of the Nursing Competence Self-Efficacy Scale

Evelyn Kennedy, PhD, RN; Gail Tomblin Murphy, PhD, RN; Ruth Martin Misener, PhD, RN-NP; Robert Alder, PhD

Abstract

Background:

The study aim was to develop and psychometrically assess an instrument to measure baccalaureate nursing students’ self-efficacy for practice competence. Social cognitive theory includes the construct of self-efficacy and supports this study.

Method:

Before the Nursing Competence Self-Efficacy Scale (NCSES) was administered to senior nursing students (N = 252), nursing experts in research, practice, instrument development, and psychometrics participated in a two-step validation process consisting of two reviews. Construct validity assessments included content, face, contrasting groups, criterion, and exploratory factor analysis (EFA). The chosen EFA solution consisted of 22 items, each moderately or highly loaded by one of four factors deemed to be interpretable and parsimonious.

Results:

The initial psychometric assessment of the NCSES supported construct validity, internal consistency reliability (.919), and test–retest stability reliability (r = .831).

Conclusion:

With further psychometric assessment, the NCSES can be useful to evaluate new curriculum interventions aimed at increasing students’ self-efficacy for comprehensive practice competence. [J Nurs Educ. 2015;54(10):550–558.]

Authors

Dr. Kennedy is Associate Professor, Cape Breton University, Sydney, Dr. Tomblin Murphy is Professor, and Dr. Martin Misener is Professor, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, and Dr. Alder is Director, Canadian Epidemiology Services, and Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Western University of Canada, London, Ontario, Canada.

This study was supported by Dalhousie University Nursing Research Fund grant 70605 8500.

The authors have disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise.

Address correspondence to Evelyn Kennedy, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, Cape Breton University, PO Box, 5300, Sydney, Nova Scotia B1P 6L2, Canada; e-mail: evelyn_kennedy@cbu.ca.

Received: November 13, 2014
Accepted: June 16, 2015

10.3928/01484834-20150916-02

Background:

The study aim was to develop and psychometrically assess an instrument to measure baccalaureate nursing students’ self-efficacy for practice competence. Social cognitive theory includes the construct of self-efficacy and supports this study.

Method:

Before the Nursing Competence Self-Efficacy Scale (NCSES) was administered to senior nursing students (N = 252), nursing experts in research, practice, instrument development, and psychometrics participated in a two-step validation process consisting of two reviews. Construct validity assessments included content, face, contrasting groups, criterion, and exploratory factor analysis (EFA). The chosen EFA solution consisted of 22 items, each moderately or highly loaded by one of four factors deemed to be interpretable and parsimonious.

Results:

The initial psychometric assessment of the NCSES supported construct validity, internal consistency reliability (.919), and test–retest stability reliability (r = .831).

Conclusion:

With further psychometric assessment, the NCSES can be useful to evaluate new curriculum interventions aimed at increasing students’ self-efficacy for comprehensive practice competence. [J Nurs Educ. 2015;54(10):550–558.]

Dr. Kennedy is Associate Professor, Cape Breton University, Sydney, Dr. Tomblin Murphy is Professor, and Dr. Martin Misener is Professor, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, and Dr. Alder is Director, Canadian Epidemiology Services, and Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Western University of Canada, London, Ontario, Canada.

This study was supported by Dalhousie University Nursing Research Fund grant 70605 8500.

The authors have disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise.

Address correspondence to Evelyn Kennedy, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, Cape Breton University, PO Box, 5300, Sydney, Nova Scotia B1P 6L2, Canada; e-mail: evelyn_kennedy@cbu.ca.

Received: November 13, 2014
Accepted: June 16, 2015
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