Journal of Nursing Education

The articles prior to January 2012 are part of the back file collection and are not available with a current paid subscription. To access the article, you may purchase it or purchase the complete back file collection here

Syllabus Selections: Innovative Learning Activities 

Using YouTube to Bridge the Gap Between Baby Boomers and Millennials

Dawn Garrett Wright, PhD, RN, CNE; Cathy Hoots Abell, PhD, RN, CNE

Abstract

There are four common generational cohorts in the current nursing workforce: Veterans, Baby Boomers, Generation Xers, and Millennials. The average nurse faculty falls in the Baby Boomer generation, whereas the majority of undergraduate nursing students belong to the Millennial generation. Having Millennials in the classroom may pose a challenge for many nurse educators. One readily available resource faculty have to meet the expectations of this generational cohort is YouTube. This syllabus selection discussed the use of this tool in nursing education.

Engaging Millennial students (those born after 1982) in the classroom may be challenging for nurse educators, who are often members of the Baby Boomer generation (those born between 1946 and 1964). Millennials are savvy in using a variety of multimedia and Internet resources and expect to see this in the classroom (Skiba & Barton, 2006). The use of YouTube videos is an innovative, cost-effective strategy that can help bridge the gap between faculty and students from different generations.

YouTube is a free video sharing site located on the Internet at http://www.youtube.com. It is popular with Millennials because it provides easy access to a variety of clips from movies, news shows, and personally posted videos. This technology is gaining support from a variety of health disciplines as a tool for presenting content and providing resource material from government and academic sites (Burke & Snyder, 2008; Burke, Snyder, & Rager, 2009).

Faculty in our program incorporate YouTube videos as a way to enhance key content being presented across the curriculum. The Table includes selected examples. Burke and Snyder (2008) mentioned that this modality is a way to bring guest speakers into geographically isolated areas or into classes that do not meet face-to-face. Faculty can provide students with the link for specific videos, offering students the opportunity to view the clip at their convenience.

Table: Selected Examples

The advantages of using YouTube include incorporating technology into the classroom setting to meet the learning needs of the current students and being able to integrate a new teaching strategy without sacrificing large amounts of time. YouTube can save universities both time and money because videos are accessible for quick, easy preview at no cost, which may decrease video and DVD purchases (Burke & Snyder, 2008). Another advantage of YouTube is that it is compatible with many popular course management software packages (Agazio & Buckley, 2009).

Challenges include the need for Internet access in the classroom or at home for online course participants. In addition, updated Antivirus and Flash Video software is required to safely view videos (Burke & Snyder, 2008; Burke et al., 2009). Faculty must recognize that videos are not permanently available and that the quality of videos may vary because any user has the ability to post videos to YouTube. Flexibility and alternate instructional plans are needed in case of Internet service is interrupted. Faculty must plan time to critique video content prior to implementing in the classroom (Burke et al., 2009). This critique includes reviewing the entire clip for language and content and verifying reliability of the source. It is recommended that faculty include a disclaimer regarding the video content in course syllabi and check with appropriate university officials regarding copyright laws (Burke & Snyder, 2008).

Students have provided impromptu comments indicating benefits from the visual supplements to lecture content. With the limitations faculty face regarding certain clinical experiences, YouTube offers an avenue for students to visualize concepts they may not otherwise have the opportunity to see during the course. Faculty have noticed that students have also begun to use YouTube videos in their classroom presentations since they have incorporated YouTube…

There are four common generational cohorts in the current nursing workforce: Veterans, Baby Boomers, Generation Xers, and Millennials. The average nurse faculty falls in the Baby Boomer generation, whereas the majority of undergraduate nursing students belong to the Millennial generation. Having Millennials in the classroom may pose a challenge for many nurse educators. One readily available resource faculty have to meet the expectations of this generational cohort is YouTube. This syllabus selection discussed the use of this tool in nursing education.

Engaging Students

Engaging Millennial students (those born after 1982) in the classroom may be challenging for nurse educators, who are often members of the Baby Boomer generation (those born between 1946 and 1964). Millennials are savvy in using a variety of multimedia and Internet resources and expect to see this in the classroom (Skiba & Barton, 2006). The use of YouTube videos is an innovative, cost-effective strategy that can help bridge the gap between faculty and students from different generations.

Getting to Know YouTube

YouTube is a free video sharing site located on the Internet at http://www.youtube.com. It is popular with Millennials because it provides easy access to a variety of clips from movies, news shows, and personally posted videos. This technology is gaining support from a variety of health disciplines as a tool for presenting content and providing resource material from government and academic sites (Burke & Snyder, 2008; Burke, Snyder, & Rager, 2009).

Incorporating YouTube in the Classroom

Faculty in our program incorporate YouTube videos as a way to enhance key content being presented across the curriculum. The Table includes selected examples. Burke and Snyder (2008) mentioned that this modality is a way to bring guest speakers into geographically isolated areas or into classes that do not meet face-to-face. Faculty can provide students with the link for specific videos, offering students the opportunity to view the clip at their convenience.

Selected Examples

Table: Selected Examples

Advantages and Challenges of Using YouTube

The advantages of using YouTube include incorporating technology into the classroom setting to meet the learning needs of the current students and being able to integrate a new teaching strategy without sacrificing large amounts of time. YouTube can save universities both time and money because videos are accessible for quick, easy preview at no cost, which may decrease video and DVD purchases (Burke & Snyder, 2008). Another advantage of YouTube is that it is compatible with many popular course management software packages (Agazio & Buckley, 2009).

Challenges include the need for Internet access in the classroom or at home for online course participants. In addition, updated Antivirus and Flash Video software is required to safely view videos (Burke & Snyder, 2008; Burke et al., 2009). Faculty must recognize that videos are not permanently available and that the quality of videos may vary because any user has the ability to post videos to YouTube. Flexibility and alternate instructional plans are needed in case of Internet service is interrupted. Faculty must plan time to critique video content prior to implementing in the classroom (Burke et al., 2009). This critique includes reviewing the entire clip for language and content and verifying reliability of the source. It is recommended that faculty include a disclaimer regarding the video content in course syllabi and check with appropriate university officials regarding copyright laws (Burke & Snyder, 2008).

Conclusion

Students have provided impromptu comments indicating benefits from the visual supplements to lecture content. With the limitations faculty face regarding certain clinical experiences, YouTube offers an avenue for students to visualize concepts they may not otherwise have the opportunity to see during the course. Faculty have noticed that students have also begun to use YouTube videos in their classroom presentations since they have incorporated YouTube videos in their presentation of material. There is little research on the effect of using of YouTube in classrooms in regard to student learning outcomes. However, Burke et al. (2009) noted faculty in various health disciplines believe YouTube is an effective teaching strategy with an expanding potential for greater use in health care and other disciplines. These authors recommend further research regarding the use of YouTube as a teaching strategy.

Dawn Garrett Wright, PhD, RN, CNE
dawn.garrett@wku.edu
Cathy Hoots Abell, PhD, RN, CNE
Western Kentucky University
School of Nursing

References

Selected Examples

Course Example of YouTube Content Links Class Activities Associated with Videos
Maternal Child Nursing http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xath6kOf0NE Discussion of cardinal movement of labor and dilatation and effacement of the cervix.
Mental Health Nursing http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DCUmINGae44 Class debate on ethical implications of electroconvulsive therapy and discussion of current standards and practices related to electroconvulsive therapy.
Pediatrics http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cxqe77-Am3w Discussion of family-based care and cerebral palsy.
Leadership and Management http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-4lko1LuJ2o&feature=fvw To facilitate discussion of definition of leadership and characteristics of a leader.
Authors

The authors have no financial or proprietary interest in the materials presented herein.

dawn.garrett@wku.edu

10.3928/01484834-20110419-03

Sign up to receive

Journal E-contents