Journal of Nursing Education

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Educational Innovations 

Camp BONES: A Partnership Initiative to Engage Underrepresented Adolescents in a Career in Nursing at the Baccalaureate Level

Deborah L. Pollard, PhD, RNC, CNE; RuthAnne Kuiper, PhD, RN, CNE; Cynthia M. Meredith, BS

Abstract

The nursing profession is confronted with significant challenges related to the ever-increasing shortage and lack of diversity in the workforce. To address these challenges, a program for underrepresented middle school students was developed collaboratively between local school districts, academia, and health care partners. The program, Camp BONES, included a 2-week summer camp and follow-up weekend and summer camp experiences for students. Experiences were provided to explore critical thinking skills in the simulated laboratories at the university, as well as at clinical practice areas in nursing. The program was guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior and self-efficacy theory. Early evaluation of the program revealed positive accolades and students’ increasing interest in pursuing nursing as a career. Collaborative programs between academia and practice areas, such as Camp BONES, provide important opportunities for middle school students to explore and engage in the nursing profession during the formative years.

Abstract

The nursing profession is confronted with significant challenges related to the ever-increasing shortage and lack of diversity in the workforce. To address these challenges, a program for underrepresented middle school students was developed collaboratively between local school districts, academia, and health care partners. The program, Camp BONES, included a 2-week summer camp and follow-up weekend and summer camp experiences for students. Experiences were provided to explore critical thinking skills in the simulated laboratories at the university, as well as at clinical practice areas in nursing. The program was guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior and self-efficacy theory. Early evaluation of the program revealed positive accolades and students’ increasing interest in pursuing nursing as a career. Collaborative programs between academia and practice areas, such as Camp BONES, provide important opportunities for middle school students to explore and engage in the nursing profession during the formative years.

Dr. Pollard is Assistant Professor, Dr. Kuiper is Associate Professor, and Ms. Meredith is Project Coordinator, Nursing and Health Academy, University of North Carolina Wilmington, School of Nursing, Wilmington, North Carolina.

The authors thank the UNCW School of Nursing, specifically the administration and faculty for their vision and ongoing support of the program; UNCW Support Staff; SEAHEC (South East Area Health Education Center); and their health care partner, New Hanover Regional Medical Center.

Address correspondence to Deborah Pollard, PhD, RNC, CNE, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina Wilmington, School of Nursing, 601 South College Road, Wilmington, NC 28403; e-mail: pollardd@uncw.edu.

Received: August 07, 2008
Accepted: February 04, 2009
Posted Online: February 04, 2010

Nurse educators are confronted with the challenge of preparing enough nurses to meet the rising health care needs of our population. Coupled with the need to prepare safe, competent nurses is the need to prepare nurses who are culturally competent. As the population in the United States becomes more diverse, it is important that health care teams reflect an approach that is equally diverse to provide culturally sensitive care. Nurses use behaviors, attitudes, and skills learned through education and cultural experiences to foster culturally competent care to work and communicate effectively with all types of patients. Sociocultural differences between patients and their providers can influence communication and clinical decision making and can be linked to health outcomes (Smedley, Stith, & Nelson, 2002).

This article describes a program, Camp BONES (Brigade of Nurse Exploring Seahawks), developed in a baccalaureate school of nursing to introduce underrepresented middle school students to a career in nursing with a long-term goal to address the current nursing shortage both in numbers and diversity of our workforce.

The current nursing workforce is faced with an overall shortage, as well as an underrepresentation across racial and ethnic groups. National projections estimate a current shortage of approximately 220,000 nurses, and it is predicted that by 2020, this need will reach approximately 808,000 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services [DHHS], 2002). Paralleling this overall shortage of RNs is an inadequate representation of minority and bilingual professionals in nursing. The number of minority nurses among the total population in nursing increased from 7% in 1980 to 12% in 2000; however, the percentage continues to be far below that of the general population, where minority representation was more than 30% in 2000 (American Nurses Association, 2003; U.S. DHHS, 2001).

To increase the number of minority nurses who can provide culturally sensitive care, the barriers, either perceived or real, must be overcome for minority students. The priority of increasing the percentage of minorities and underrepresented groups in the nursing workforce involves recruitment and retention measures that address the psychosocial and academic issues that exist for minority students and may not be anticipated, addressed, or considered (Fleming, Berkowitz, & Cheadle, 2005).

One strategy to recruit minority students is to reach out to these underrepresented populations during their elementary and high school education to encourage early engagement and to academically prepare them for the rigor of nursing education (Adams & Price-Lea, 2004). The deficit in the minority nurse workforce can be influenced by addressing the educational issues of youths from all ages and backgrounds with events such as the summer camp developed for this project. Students in middle school were targeted for this project because this is when students begin to explore career options and career planning decisions can be affected (Benz, 1996; Cohen, Palumbo, Rambur, & Mongeon, 2004).

The goal of Camp BONES was to provide a select group of 7th and 8th grade middle school minority students with the opportunity to be introduced to professional nursing roles and requirements for admission to a program, practice life study skills in the foundational science and math content areas, practice critical thinking skills in the learning of nursing practice skill sets using human patient simulation, and be exposed to real-life clinical practice by shadowing a practicing nurse. Both girls and boys were included in the group of middle school students who were recruited with the long-term goal to increase the percentage of minorities and men in the nursing workforce.

These students spent 1 week at the school of nursing with faculty and graduate students to learn about nursing roles, basic nursing knowledge, and skills. The campers then went to the hospital for 1 week to shadow a nurse to observe authentic health care providers in their work environments. These combined experiences provided a comprehensive rich summer experience for these students considering a career in nursing. Following the summer camp opportunity, the plan is to continue to engage this same group of students with ongoing weekend experiences and annual summer experiences throughout their middle school and high school years.

Background

To improve the balance between the nursing workforce demographics and the nation’s demographics, minority students, particularly those from middle schools, need an introduction to the nursing profession. An established summer health careers program for high school juniors has been open to minority and disadvantaged students for 10 years in North Carolina (Bumgarner, Means, & Ford, 2003). This program initially targeted rural students but now includes all interested students. An evaluation of the program reveals 70% of the 160 students who participated in the program are pursuing a health profession career, with 50% of these students choosing a career in nursing.

Other programs have been described in the literature to reach out to middle school students (Cohen et al., 2006; Thacker, 2005). Strategies described in these programs include virtual dissections, microbiology and chemistry laboratory experiences, sterilization techniques used in the operating department, and simulation using SimMan® in a nursing skills laboratory. Other learning activities included a nurse shadow experience, a nursing club, and visits to area health care facilities.

The Association of periOperative Registered Nurses (AORN) developed a high school/grade school-level task force to teach prospective students about perioperative nursing (AORN, 2006; McNamara, 2005). This program included open house visits to an operating department, education about surgical skills and techniques, visiting schools, and showing videotapes about perioperative nursing.

The Georgia Nurses Association also targeted education for middle school and high school students regarding careers in nursing (Recruitment of Middle and High School Students, 2005). In Georgia, the Health Occupations Students of America and the Area Health Education Center initiatives have included planning dissemination to local schools, supporting legislation for scholarships, developing health careers recruitment programs, mentoring programs with faculty in higher education facilities, and encouraging contact among nursing students, middle school students, and high school students. Planned activities included career games for children, lesson plans, and career education.

The Wisconsin Youth in Nursing program (Stewart & Cleveland, 2003) had the goal of admitting quality minority students to summer programs for an introduction to nursing roles. These minority students had classes taught by faculty that included science and math classes, nursing skills, and games. The students also had field trip tours to various hospital-based clinical units. The overall evaluation by the students was positive and piqued an interest in the field of health care. This is the model that was replicated with Camp BONES because it was demonstrated that a combination of strategies enhanced recruitment and retention of ethnic minorities (Thacker, 2005).

Using strategies described in these programs, the model for Camp BONES was developed between a school of nursing, Area Health Education Center (AHEC), a regional medical center, and a county school system. Each partner participated in a unique way to bring about learning through collaborative experiences for the students. The program coordinator for the camp was employed with the AHEC and historically recruited this population of students for health education activities for many years. The AHEC was supportive in partnering with the school of nursing to expand their health education programs by using the faculty resources and simulation laboratory to enrich student learning.

The local regional medical center, which had previously participated in shadowing experiences with these students, could now offer a more engaging opportunity for the students because they had learned some basic assessment skills at Camp BONES. The students were better able to understand the procedures and skills they observed in the acute care setting. The role of the county school system remained the same in that the teachers and guidance counselors provided the camp coordinator with potential candidates for camp enrollment.

Theoretical Framework

Research suggests health care disparities may be reduced by increasing the number of minorities working in health care occupations. A conceptual framework that matches the intentions of this project is the Theory of Planned Behavior, which describes a predictive relationship between stated intentions and behavior (Ajzen, 1991). Specifically, if students intend to pursue a health care career and are subjected to a curriculum that strengthens and reinforces skills and knowledge, do they continue to pursue a health care career?

Bandura’s theory of self-efficacy (1997) also has influenced the success of this program in that perceived self-efficacy is the belief in one’s capabilities to organize and execute the courses of action required to produce an outcome. It has been shown that children who perceive themselves as academically efficacious believe a wider range of careers is available to them, including careers in science and medicine (Bandura, Barbaranelli, Caprara, & Pastorelli, 2001). Therefore, by influencing the behavior of this cohort of minority students through improving life-study skills and critical thinking surrounding health career information, it is hoped their perceived self-efficacy and intention to pursue a health career, particularly in nursing, will be maintained.

Planning

Some variables that have been identified that predict academic success in higher education for minority students include high school grade point average; scores on achievement tests; reading, vocabulary, and mathematical skills; and study skills (Boyle, 1986). Another factor identified for minority student success is mentoring with feedback and support (Bessent, 1997; Memmer & Worth, 1991). Therefore, the strategies planned for the Camp BONES were designed to eliminate role stereotypes and gender biases, provide mentorship, increase understanding about nursing practice, and provide skills for success in a future health career education. After the completion of the summer camp, return campus visits were planned to refresh the student’s knowledge, rekindle their interest in nursing as a career, and maintain mentoring contact to provide support and guidance for career planning.

Middle school education is when children often decide on their careers, so a cohort of 7th and 8th grade students with at least a “B” average in school work were targeted and recruited for the first summer camp. The campers were introduced to the book The Pact: Three Young Men Make a Promise and Fulfill a Dream (Davis, Jenkins, Hunt, & Page, 2002) prior to coming to the camp, and they were asked to write a report on the choices made by the friends in the book. This book was chosen because it represents the struggles and temptations that young minority children face that may block their future success in health care. This true story depicts three African American doctors who made a pact in an inner-city high school to find a way to go to college and then medical school.

The existing Health Careers Work-force Diversity Program offered by the AHEC has had the goal to increase the applicant pool of minority students to health careers and to increase the cultural diversity awareness of area employers, educators, and practitioners. This was accomplished by providing students and educators with information and experiences related to health careers and college preparation, as well as providing resources on various health careers.

The current week-long summer program in place for 7th and 8th graders provides hands-on experience supervised by faculty from the university and local community colleges to provide topical instruction in nursing, science, medical technology, and biomedical equipment. Partnering with the university school of nursing and a regional medical center for a nursing camp expanded the existing resources and provided a richer experience for the minority students as they were introduced to a career in nursing by faculty and nursing students using 21st century technology and human patient simulation.

By establishing Camp BONES for middle school students, academic-community partnerships are strengthened, and the vision and mission of all interest groups is implemented. The students who were recruited for this camp came from the diverse community school districts served by the university. Specifically, by interacting with the middle school students, the faculty and nursing students at the school of nursing, the health careers staff at the AHEC, and practicing nurses at the regional medical center demonstrated and taught health care practices, promoting and recruiting for health care careers, affecting the health care practices of the larger community, integrating technology and games into learning, and promoting lifelong learning in its future students.

Reinforcement of the knowledge students acquired and the cognitive skills they developed during the 2-week camp will be renewed through periodic campus visits during a weekend in the fall and spring, and 1 week in the summer. The first fall weekend program for the campers consisted of a mock disaster scenario to practice health care assessment skills. A spring weekend involved a research activity on cardiac health and concluded with a poster presentation in the university library. The campers from the first-year program served as mentors for the new class of campers participating in Camp BONES during summer 2007. Nine of the original 10 students from the initial program in 2006 participated in the ongoing weekend and summer activities throughout the 2006–2007 academic year.

Implementation

A committee was formed to plan for the camp and included representatives from the AHEC, school of nursing, and regional medical center; members initially met to determine project feasibility and identify required partner specific roles. The AHEC coordinated the community public schools to recruit the students for the camp. An introductory dinner sponsored by the university was designed to introduce the camp to the parents and local school representatives. The university provided housing for the students, dining facilities, resident hall counselors, and a campus tour. The university also conducted evening activities for the first week of the camp. The school of nursing faculty provided the daily learning activities during the first week of the camp as well as the fall and spring weekend activities. The regional medical center provided the nursing staff, who served as mentors for the students to shadow during the second week of the camp. A detailed camp schedule for the first week of camp is provided in Table 1.

Camp Bones (Brigade of Nurse Exploring Seahawks): Week One Schedule, Cohort One

Table 1: Camp Bones (Brigade of Nurse Exploring Seahawks): Week One Schedule, Cohort One

The first summer Camp BONES was planned by faculty and staff; however, a future initiative is to have graduate nursing students involved in the planning, implementation, and evaluation phases of the project. Potential advanced practice nurse competencies that could be developed from participation in this educational activity include project development and evaluation, research, educational theory application, community education practice, and minority recruitment strategies. One project involving the research project of a graduate student was implemented during the first year of the program. The graduate project evaluated the effectiveness of an education program on fast food choices in adolescents (Allen, Taylor, & Kuiper, 2007).

The follow-up fall weekend activities included a 4-hour mock disaster drill at the school of nursing and a 4-hour nurse shadowing experience at the regional medical center to reemphasize and practice the health assessment skills learned during the summer camp. Disaster triage was first introduced to the middle school students during the summer camp by accessing FEMA for Kids (Federal Emergency Management Agency, 2006) and working through the Web site to introduce students to this area of health care. The spring weekend activities will include a university library research experience to reemphasize and practice the study skills learned during the summer camp.

Evaluation

Evaluation of Camp BONES was conducted throughout the 2 weeks of camp activities. Specific demographic information on the cohort of minority students recruited for the Camp was collected on the first day. This first cohort of 10 students came from rural areas in southeast North Carolina. The participants ranged in age from 12 to 14 and included 1 Hispanic boy, 2 Hispanic girls, and 7 African American girls.

Two additional surveys were used to evaluate the program, the Camp BONES Self-Monitoring Survey (Table 2) and the Camp BONES Program Satisfaction Survey (Table 3). The Theory of Planned Behavior (Ajzen, 1991) and Bandura’s theory of self-efficacy (1997) were operationalized by a faculty member who developed the Camp BONES Self-Monitoring Survey. This instrument was available to the students at the end of each day in the computer center laboratory.

Camp BONES Self-Monitoring Survey

Table 2: Camp BONES Self-Monitoring Survey

Camp BONES Program Satisfaction Survey

Table 3: Camp BONES Program Satisfaction Survey

The Self-Monitoring Survey was analyzed specifically for changes in self-efficacy, critical thinking skills, life study skills, and behavioral intention to choose a nursing career over the course of the 2-week program. Specifically, the survey was administered at the end of days 2, 3, 4, and 5, and then after the fall weekend experience. These surveys served to determine the extent of nursing role immersion and to determine needs for subsequent project offerings.

The overall word analysis of narrative answers revealed the top five concerns these middle school students had were:

  • Emotional reactions to the camp.
  • Communication with faculty, counselors, and each other.
  • Thinking strategies used each day.
  • The learning environments in which they found themselves.
  • The situations in which they had to learn and perform skills.

Self-efficacy perceptions changed throughout the first week because each day’s activities were unique and different. When asked about their impressions of performance, the campers indicated they were very involved regardless of their knowledge level. One camper stated, “The simulations were outstanding and we could see how we don’t have much experience.” Other evaluations of self-efficacy included, “We did a wonderful job mainly because we worked with others to complete the tasks,” and “We were a little weak in the morning but pumped up in the afternoon.”

Problems and solutions were also unique to each day’s activities. The campers were able to use critical-thinking skills by accurately identifying problems, analyzing where the difficulties originated, and explaining the critical thinking skills used to solve them. For example, it was determined that transporting patients from wheelchairs to beds was a difficult skill. The problem was solved by listening, asking questions, thinking, and paying attention. Ultimately one camper stated, “I followed directions and did my best.”

The life study skills that were identified remained consistent throughout the week. The common skills these campers identified across time included paying attention, taking notes, listening, thinking, watching, asking for help, and staying away from distractions. When the campers were asked how they made changes to complete the skills they learned, a typical response was “retracing the steps, figuring out what I had done wrong, correct myself, and make changes.”

The behavioral intention of choosing a career in nursing also did not change over time. The interest in nursing as a career ranged from 90% to 100% during the first week. The intention to actually apply to nursing school ranged from 66% to 80%. When asked whether they were interested in a health career other than nursing, their responses were 50% neutral and 50% disagree. Their responses were 50% neutral related to choosing a career not in health care.

The same survey was administered during the fall weekend mock disaster drill. The word analysis after this experience revealed students’ top concerns were:

  • A concentration on time.
  • Reactions to the disaster activities.
  • The environment of the mock disaster.
  • The situation of trauma victims.
  • The knowledge they had to recall from the summer to perform skills.

The perceived problems during this weekend were related to the panic experienced during the mock disaster drill, but the majority of middle school students were trying to remember the skills they learned in the summer camp. Asking questions and staying close to the faculty mentor during the experience helped them to remain calm. In fact, some claimed flashbacks from the summer and concentrated on “hard critical thinking.” Self-efficacy in the reflections on the activities was evident with the comments “I am proud because I remembered what to do” and “I did well for that adventure for the first time.”

Behavioral intention to enroll in a nursing program after this weekend revealed the following:

  • Students’ 100% interest in nursing as a career.
  • Students’ intention to actually apply to nursing school was 90%.
  • When asked whether they were interested in a health career other than nursing, 22% of students were neutral and 22% agreed.
  • Finally, 22% of students were neutral regarding not choosing a career not in health care.

Implications for Nursing

Although the AHEC has been working with the community school districts and minority students to introduce them to health careers for some time, the addition of the school of nursing became an asset with technology in the form of human patient simulation and the addition of nursing faculty offering resources to add to the richness of the student experiences. The overall goal was to have a self-sustaining project one day to funnel minority and diverse students into the nursing workforce by exposing them to the possibilities that they may not be able to achieve any other way. School nursing practice is affected by these efforts in helping to identify those middle school students who might be interested in a nurse camp and supporting their efforts to be accepted into the program. School nurses often know which students are interested in nursing and can support them before, during, and after camp experiences. The collaborative effort by these partners has been in place since summer 2006.

This program has shown that self-efficacy with learning and practicing nursing skills is possible with middle school students in this geographical region. The faculty determined that more face-to-face interaction and discussion with the campers, faculty, and students is important for earlier engagement in the activities of the camp. Games were an excellent way of introducing information and keeping the attention of this age group.

The reinforcement of life study skills and critical thinking skills needed for health careers can be realized by camp participants in a week-long experience. The behavioral intention to choose a career in health care or nursing can be influenced with programs for diverse and ethnic children by appropriate planning, implementation, and evaluation of targeted activities. In addition, obtaining grant money for a budget to buy equipment and compensate faculty is important for maintaining state-of-the-art technology that offers the best simulation interaction.

Conclusion

Camp BONES had the following objectives for a select group of 7th and 8th grade middle school minority students:

  • Introduction to professional nursing roles and the requirements for admission to an accredited program.
  • Practice of life study skills with foundational science and math activities.
  • Practice with critical thinking skills by learning nursing practice skill sets using human patient simulation.
  • Exposure to real-life clinical practice by shadowing a practicing nurse.

With the model developed collaboratively between the AHEC, local school districts, the school of nursing, and the regional medical center, each participated in a unique way to bring about learning, caring, and nurturing experiences for the students. The established model in this project could be replicated to reach countless minority young people to stimulate an interest in nursing roles, including school nursing, for recruitment and retention where the needs are greatest.

References

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  • Bandura, A., Barbaranelli, C., Caprara, G.V. & Pastorelli, C. (2001). Self-efficacy beliefs as shapers of children’s aspirations and career trajectories. Child Development, 72, 187–206. doi:10.1111/1467-8624.00273 [CrossRef]
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  • McNamara, S.A. (2005). Helping young people paint the canvas of life. AORN Journal, 82, 557–560. doi:10.1016/S0001-2092(06)60020-3 [CrossRef]
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Camp Bones (Brigade of Nurse Exploring Seahawks): Week One Schedule, Cohort One

Sunday: Day 1Monday: Day 2Tuesday: Day 3Wednesday: Day 4Thursday: Day 5Friday: Day 6
5:00–6:00 pm Camper check-in8:00–9:00 am Breakfast8:00–9:00 am Breakfast8:00–9:00 am Breakfast8:00–9:00 am Breakfast8:00–9:00 am Breakfast
6:15–7:15 pm Walking tour of the campus (university ambassadors)9:00–9:15 am Welcome to university campus9:00–9:15 am Roll call and preconference9:00–9:15 am Roll call and preconference9:00–9:15 am Roll call and preconference9:00–9:15 am Roll call and preconference
Welcome from university school of nursingJohnson & Johnson video and plans for the day
7:15–9:00 pm Overview of camp: rules established; ice breaker; games and meetings with residence hall counselors9:30–11:45 am Introduction to Professional Nursing Roles: Adult nursing, pediatric nursing, maternal-child nursing, perioperative nursing, psychiatric nursing, flight nursing, advanced practitioner nursing (nurse practitioner, CRNA, nurse educator)9:30–11:45 am Science stations

A&P dissection activity

Chemistry experiment

9:30–11:45 am Clinical simulation, 5 students per group, 45 minutes per station

SimBaby activity

Noelle activity

VitaSim activity

9:30–11:45 am Clinical simulation, 5 students per group, 45 minutes per station

Virtual hospital unit

Vital signs practice

Medication calculations

9:30–11:30 am

Review of book reports

Evaluation essay

Overview of second week

12:00–1:00 pm Lunch12:00–1:00 pm Lunch12:00–1:00 pm Lunch12:00–1:00 pm Lunch12:00–1:00 pm Closing luncheon
1:00–3:45 pm (School of nursing) University admission requirements1:00–3:15 pm Health assessment across the life spanTopics in sexuality1:00–3:45 pm

SimMan activity

MicroSim

Documentation

1:00–3:15 pm

Medical asepsis

Quizdom

3:15–4:15 pm
1:00–2:00 pm Checkout
School of nursing admission requirements3:15–4:15 pm Risk factors for chronic illnessOpen computer time to work on essay
Johnson & Johnson video and Web site“Who Wants to Be a Nurse” game
4:00–5:00 pm Postconference4:00–5:00 pm Postconference4:00–5:00 pm Postconference4:00–5:00 pm Postconference
5:15–6:15 pm Dinner5:15–6:15 pm Dinner5:15–6:15 pm Dinner5:15–6:15 pm Dinner
6:30–8:30 pm Evening activity6:30–8:30 pm Evening activity6:30–8:30 pm Evening activity6:30–8:30 pm Evening activity
CPR and first aid skillsTeam buildingNutrition, service learningDisaster awareness

Camp BONES Self-Monitoring Survey

The thinking skills I used today.

The problems I encountered today were:
I solved problems at camp today by:
When I had difficulty at camp today:
When I think about my feelings during camp today, I would describe them as:
I handled my feelings at camp today by:
When I tried to remember or understand important information to solve a problem, I:
As I look back, I could have spent more time on:
As I look back, I could have spent less time on:

The camp environment today.

When I played a game or did a skill today:
When I think about distractions at camp today:
When I worked with the other students and I needed help:

Behaviors and reactions to camp today.

My impression of my performance at camp today was that I:
I made sure I completed my skills today at camp by:
If I needed to make changes to complete the skills, I:
My reaction to what I liked about camp today was:
My reaction to what I did not like about camp today was:

Strongly AgreeAgreeDon’t care either wayDisagreeDisagree Strongly

I am interested in a career in nursing12345
I intend to apply to nursing school one day12345
I am interested in a health career different from nursing12345
I have decided to choose a career that is not in health care12345

Camp BONES Program Satisfaction Survey

Name:_________________________School:______________________
Did Camp BONES help you decide if you would like to become a nurse? YES_____NO_____
If YES, how did it help?
Did your experience at Camp BONES help you decide if you would like to have a career in another medical field? YES_______NO________
If YES, what field?
What is the most important thing you learned from Nursing at Camp BONES?
If your friends ask you about Camp BONES, what would you tell them?
Were you adequately prepared for your Camp BONES experience?
If no, what could have been done to improve your preparation?
When you went to the hospital, was the nurse ready to work with you?
Were you introduced to everyone at Camp BONES and the hospital?
Were you made to feel welcome? YES______NO_______
What was your favorite part of Camp BONES and why?
What was your least favorite part of Camp BONES and why?
How can we improve Camp BONES for next year?
Authors

Dr. Pollard is Assistant Professor, Dr. Kuiper is Associate Professor, and Ms. Meredith is Project Coordinator, Nursing and Health Academy, University of North Carolina Wilmington, School of Nursing, Wilmington, North Carolina.

Address correspondence to Deborah Pollard, PhD, RNC, CNE, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina Wilmington, School of Nursing, 601 South College Road, Wilmington, NC 28403; e-mail: .pollardd@uncw.edu

10.3928/01484834-20091118-03

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