Journal of Nursing Education

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Faculty Q&A 

Faculty Q&A

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2006;45(11):437-438
  • Posted April 3, 2012

Abstract

I supervise clinical groups on two different units. During clinical orientation, and once to reinforce learning, I give contact telephone numbers to students so they can always reach me if I am on the other unit. However, I was distressed to read in evaluations that students thought I was not available. What strategies can I use to reduce this perception?

Faculty are often apprehensive of giving true clinical evaluations and avoid adding unwarranted points to examinations because of the weight given to student evaluations. How can I protect myself from being “blasted” in the evaluation process when giving the grade or evaluation a student earned?

We regularly use multiple-choice questions in our examinations, but I don’t think I write the best questions. Can you give some hints about writing good questions?

In the August column, we asked how can senior faculty embrace new, young, energetic faculty members? In my answer, I invited other senior faculty to share their ways of enhancing the development of new faculty. Here is one response.

Abstract

I supervise clinical groups on two different units. During clinical orientation, and once to reinforce learning, I give contact telephone numbers to students so they can always reach me if I am on the other unit. However, I was distressed to read in evaluations that students thought I was not available. What strategies can I use to reduce this perception?

Faculty are often apprehensive of giving true clinical evaluations and avoid adding unwarranted points to examinations because of the weight given to student evaluations. How can I protect myself from being “blasted” in the evaluation process when giving the grade or evaluation a student earned?

We regularly use multiple-choice questions in our examinations, but I don’t think I write the best questions. Can you give some hints about writing good questions?

In the August column, we asked how can senior faculty embrace new, young, energetic faculty members? In my answer, I invited other senior faculty to share their ways of enhancing the development of new faculty. Here is one response.

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