Journal of Nursing Education

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NEWS & ANNOUNCEMENTS

Abstract

Maverick Journalist Ellerbee Slated to Keynote '89 National League for Nursing Convention in Seattle

Registrants for the National League for Nursing's upcoming convention in Seattle can prepare for a singular experience: Award- winning television journalist and best-selling author Linda Ellerbee promises to wow convention-goers with her renowned abilities as a no-nonsense, witty, and highly-skilled wordsmith - both on the screen and in print.

Ellerbee will set the pace as keynoter for NLN's 19th biennial convention, scheduled for June 11-15, 1989, at Seattle's brand-new Washington State Convention Center and planned around the theme, "Thriving in the '90s through quality and creativity."

At NBC News, Ellerbee spent 11 years covering the U.S. Congress, presidential campaigns, national political conventions, and other events. Her intelligent and creative "tell-it-like-it-is" style won her many fans and a reputation for quality, but often placed her at odds with the traditional thinking of many network executives. She anchored and wrote the award-winning news magazine Weekend and NBC News Overnight, which was cited by the Columbia duPont Awards people as possibly "the best written and most intelligent news program ever."

Also to Ellerbee's credit as a writer and anchorwoman at NBC are the Today Show's feature series TGIF, Summer Sunday-USA, and several documentaries.

In 1986, Ellerbee moved to ABC to write and anchor the prime-time historical series Our World, which won that year's Emmy for best writing.

A long-time advocate of women's issues, Ellerbee writes at length in her best-selling book And So It Goes about battling for recognition in the maledominated world of network television. She counts Overnight as a small triumph in that battle - from top management on down, about three-fourths of the staff were women.

Ellerbee describes in the book the success of what could be termed a "holistic" management style on Overnight and emphasizes the value in the workplace of women's ability to "recognize that a person is the sum of any number of parts, each of them important, and that he works best when all parts are taken into consideration. Women are allowed to think that way. Women are even expected to think that way. They're just not expected to be in charge."

Ellerbee has since left the networks to form her own television production company, Lucky Duck Productions, which produces programs for network, syndication, cable, and public television. For those unfamiliar with her work, Ellerbee's winning style is revealed in comments about And So It Goes:

* "Ellerbee talks tough about the shortcomings of her profession and salty about sex and sexism at the office . . ." - Time magazine

* "Funny, acerbic and, most of all, informed. Ellerbee writes deliriously and on target." - Mike Wallace

* The woman is raucous and irreverent and writes like a dream." - Ted Koppel

To register for the convention, call NLN toll-free for information: 800-847-8480, or, in New York State, 800-442-4546.

Shortridge of Hartsdale Promoted to Associate Dean of Nursing Research and Clinical Practice of Pace's Lienhard School

Dr. Lillie M. Shortridge of Hartsdale, New York, has been appointed associate dean for Nursing Research and Clinical Practice at Pace University's Lienhard School of Nursing. Shortridge is a professor at Lienhard and has been the assistant dean for the Center for Nursing Research and Clinical Practice for the past six years.

Her newly created position was established because of the greater emphasis on research and scholarship in both the Lienhard School of Nursing and University, and the increased productivity of Lienhard's faculty and clinical staff, requiring a further commitment of support toward these efforts. The School seeks to fully integrate research into didactic and…

Maverick Journalist Ellerbee Slated to Keynote '89 National League for Nursing Convention in Seattle

Registrants for the National League for Nursing's upcoming convention in Seattle can prepare for a singular experience: Award- winning television journalist and best-selling author Linda Ellerbee promises to wow convention-goers with her renowned abilities as a no-nonsense, witty, and highly-skilled wordsmith - both on the screen and in print.

Ellerbee will set the pace as keynoter for NLN's 19th biennial convention, scheduled for June 11-15, 1989, at Seattle's brand-new Washington State Convention Center and planned around the theme, "Thriving in the '90s through quality and creativity."

At NBC News, Ellerbee spent 11 years covering the U.S. Congress, presidential campaigns, national political conventions, and other events. Her intelligent and creative "tell-it-like-it-is" style won her many fans and a reputation for quality, but often placed her at odds with the traditional thinking of many network executives. She anchored and wrote the award-winning news magazine Weekend and NBC News Overnight, which was cited by the Columbia duPont Awards people as possibly "the best written and most intelligent news program ever."

Also to Ellerbee's credit as a writer and anchorwoman at NBC are the Today Show's feature series TGIF, Summer Sunday-USA, and several documentaries.

In 1986, Ellerbee moved to ABC to write and anchor the prime-time historical series Our World, which won that year's Emmy for best writing.

A long-time advocate of women's issues, Ellerbee writes at length in her best-selling book And So It Goes about battling for recognition in the maledominated world of network television. She counts Overnight as a small triumph in that battle - from top management on down, about three-fourths of the staff were women.

Ellerbee describes in the book the success of what could be termed a "holistic" management style on Overnight and emphasizes the value in the workplace of women's ability to "recognize that a person is the sum of any number of parts, each of them important, and that he works best when all parts are taken into consideration. Women are allowed to think that way. Women are even expected to think that way. They're just not expected to be in charge."

Ellerbee has since left the networks to form her own television production company, Lucky Duck Productions, which produces programs for network, syndication, cable, and public television. For those unfamiliar with her work, Ellerbee's winning style is revealed in comments about And So It Goes:

* "Ellerbee talks tough about the shortcomings of her profession and salty about sex and sexism at the office . . ." - Time magazine

* "Funny, acerbic and, most of all, informed. Ellerbee writes deliriously and on target." - Mike Wallace

* The woman is raucous and irreverent and writes like a dream." - Ted Koppel

To register for the convention, call NLN toll-free for information: 800-847-8480, or, in New York State, 800-442-4546.

Shortridge of Hartsdale Promoted to Associate Dean of Nursing Research and Clinical Practice of Pace's Lienhard School

Dr. Lillie M. Shortridge of Hartsdale, New York, has been appointed associate dean for Nursing Research and Clinical Practice at Pace University's Lienhard School of Nursing. Shortridge is a professor at Lienhard and has been the assistant dean for the Center for Nursing Research and Clinical Practice for the past six years.

Her newly created position was established because of the greater emphasis on research and scholarship in both the Lienhard School of Nursing and University, and the increased productivity of Lienhard's faculty and clinical staff, requiring a further commitment of support toward these efforts. The School seeks to fully integrate research into didactic and clinical teaching of courses throughout all undergraduate and graduate programs.

Shortridge founded the Center for Nursing Research and Clinical Practice at the Lienhard School of Nursing. The Center fosters the development of nursing research and other scholarly endeavors, and facilitates consultation and practice, serving as a focal point for planning, collaboration, and communication. The Center developed and manages two health-care units, one with three divisions for the University population and one with two divisions for the homeless in Westchester.

Shortridge is director for Education of the Institute for Urban Family Health. She is a co-founder of the Homeless Services Network, Inc. Her latest new office is as president of the Eastern Nursing Research Society of Mid-Atlantic Regional Nursing Association and New England Organization of Nurses.

She received her BSN from Berea College and her master's degree and doctorate from Teacher's College, Columbia University. From 1977 to 1978, she was one of The Robert Wood Johnson Nurse Faculty Fellows in Primary Care at the University of Colorado in Denver. In 1982 and 1983, she studied family therapy at the Center for Family Learning. Her research interests include homelessness, a health action model; levels of intervention for health and illness; development of a multi-generational family stress scale; and the relationship of performance, beliefs, and knowledge to self-efficacy.

She is co-author of three nursing textbooks and has written several chapters, articles, and book reviews. She has also made presentations at many international and national meetings.

Arnold of Perm's School of Nursing Appointed to National Commission to Prevent Infant Mortality

Lauren Shields Arnold, MSN, RN, of the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, has been appointed to serve as a consultant to the National Commission to Prevent Infant Mortality.

Arnold recently finished a one-year Kellogg Public and Health Policy Fellowship in Washington, working with the Congressional Commission on the development and implementation of a national strategy for reducing infant mortality in the United States.

As a consultant to the Commission, Arnold will help to implement the recommendations presented to Congress on August 4, 1988, in the report entitled "Death Before Life," to which she contributed.

The National Commission to Prevent Infant Mortality was created by Congress and established on July 1, 1987. The fifteen members of the Commission include members of Congress, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, the Comptroller General of the United States, representatives of state governments and experts in the maternal and child health field.

The Commission held a series of public hearings and meetings, reviewed current federal and state programs and policies affecting the health of women and their infants, and examined the cost of health care for these individuals.

Arnold is a doctoral candidate at the School of Nursing where she is a lecturer in the graduate Perinatal Program. She has collaborated on several research studies investigating the causes and treatment of high-risk pregnancy, birth, and recovery, including a study on follow-up home care for patients discharged early from hospitals.

Arnold has also given speeches and presentations, and published articles on nursing practice, high-risk pregnancy, and perinatal practice.

Among her professional appointments, Arnold has served as the Program Chair for the Philadelphia Perinatal Association, and as Chairperson for the Council of High Risk Perinatal Nurses of the American Nurses Association.

The professional organizations she is a member of include: Sigma Theta Tau, the national honor society for nursing, American Nurses Association, and the National and Pennsylvania Perinatal Association.

Brooten of Penn's School of Nursing Receives Five Awards

This has been a banner year for Dorothy Brooten, PhD, RN, FAAN, of the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. Brooten, a professor in Penn's School of Nursing, has received five nursing awards in the past academic year.

Brooten is the recipient of the 1987 Pennsylvania Nurses' Association Nursing Research Award, the 1988 Maternal Child Nurse of the Year Award presented by the American Nurses Association Council on Maternal-Child Nursing, the 1988 March of Dimes National Nurse of the Year Award, the 1988 American Nurses' Foundation Distinguished Contribution to Nursing Research Award and the 1988 Outstanding Alumni Award from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing.

"I am very honored to receive these awards because recognition from my peers is the most valued honor of all," Brooten said.

Claire Fagin, Margaret Bond Simon Dean of Penn's School of Nursing commented "We are proud of Dotty and her wonderful contributions to the nursing profession."

Brooten is the chairperson of Health Care of Women and the Childbearing Family Section, and the director of the Perinatal Nursing-Graduate Program at Perm's School of Nursing.

She is a past associate editor of "Nursing Research" and is currently a member of the Editorial Boards of "Advances in Nursing Science," "Image," and "Women's Health International."

Rush College of Nursing Awarded $500,000 AIDS Grant

The College of Nursing at Rush University has been awarded a five-year training grant to provide research fellowships to pre- and postdoctoral students with an interest in nursing care of persons with AIDS.

The $514,986 grant was awarded by the National Center for Nursing Research of the National Institutes of Health. It is the first institutional National Research Service Award given by NIH to prepare nurse scientists in AIDS research.

"We are extremely pleased to be the recipient of this major research training grant for important new work in nursing's fight against AIDS," said Kathleen Gainor Andreoli, DSN, the John L. and Helen Kellogg Dean of the College of Nursing and Vice President, Nursing Affairs, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center.

"This grant will allow us to train graduate nurses as leaders in the design and delivery of nursing care services to persons with AIDS," said Dr. Andreoli. "It also will provide funds to prepare nursing postdoctoral fellows to be advanced scientists in AIDS research. The Medical Center's contribution to the field of AIDS nursing care and research will be enhanced by this multidisciplinary approach."

The training faculty at Rush includes experts in immunology, virology, nutrition, stress management, caregiver support, coping/hope, symptom management, and health policy/ economics.

Predoctoral fellows will earn a doctorate of nursing science degree with a focus on AIDS nursing and will be able to function as nurse scientists in a variety of clinical, educational, management, and research areas. Postdoctoral fellows will be advanced research scientists, qualified to develop their own research programs in AIDS nursing. Depending on research and coursework emphasis, trainees may be qualified for a joint faculty appointment in a biological, behavioral, or organizational science department.

Studies will be pursued in the following areas:

* the role of nutrition in maintaining the integrity of the immune system;

* strategies for optimal nutritional support for persons infected with HIV.

* identification of social support networks available to persons with AIDS, their families, and significant others;

* role of stress in immune system decompensation in persons infected with HIV;

* potential strategies for stress reduction in HIV-infected individuals;

* financial impact of AIDS on persons infected with HIV as well as on the health-care industry in general; and,

* alterations in immune function in HIV-positive persons treated with antiviral chemotherapy.

The grant is being directed by Janice M. Zeller, PhD, RN. Dr. Zeller has faculty appointments in the departments of medical nursing and immunology/microbiology. Co-directors of the program are Marilee I. Donovan, PhD, RN, chairperson, medical nursing, and Dr. Andreoli.

10.3928/0148-4834-19890201-15

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