Journal of Nursing Education

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EDITORIAL 

Seeking Consensus in Nursing

Rheba de Tornyay, RN, EdD, FAAN

Abstract

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation has funded a three-year project totaling $1,175,000 to provide leadership in achieving consensus related to education, licensure, and credentialing in the nursing profession. The project will be the collaborative effort of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, the American Nurses' Association, the National League for Nursing, and the American Society of Nursing Service Administrators.

This project resulted from the work of the National Commission on Nursing, an independent multidisciplinary body of 31 leaders in nursing, medicine, health care governance and administration, academia, and government. The Commission challenged nursing to take the lead in determining the major policies that will lead to cost-effective, quality nursing care.

The major goal of this project will be the development of a cost-effective, coordinated, community-based system of health service in which nursing plays an appropriate role. To that end, the project staff, work groups, and consultants will help nursing reach consensus on the following:

1. The common body of knowledge and skills essential for basic nursing practice, the curriculum content that supports it, and the credentialing process that reinforces it.

2. The testing, refinement, and advancement of the knowledge base on which improved education and practice rests.

3. The identification of the appropriate management of nursing resources to achieve nursing's goals.

Each of these objectives will involve a major area of investigation: nursing education, nursing research, and nursing management. The work will be accomplished by three major work groups, one in each of the areas. A staff member will be assigned to each work group.

Seeking consensus among nurses is not an easy task, but must be accomplished if nursing is to assume its rightful place in health care. We believe the implementation of the major findings of the major studies on nursing during the past few decades is long overdue and applaud the W.K. Kellogg Foundation for their support for nursing and the people nurses serve.…

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation has funded a three-year project totaling $1,175,000 to provide leadership in achieving consensus related to education, licensure, and credentialing in the nursing profession. The project will be the collaborative effort of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, the American Nurses' Association, the National League for Nursing, and the American Society of Nursing Service Administrators.

This project resulted from the work of the National Commission on Nursing, an independent multidisciplinary body of 31 leaders in nursing, medicine, health care governance and administration, academia, and government. The Commission challenged nursing to take the lead in determining the major policies that will lead to cost-effective, quality nursing care.

The major goal of this project will be the development of a cost-effective, coordinated, community-based system of health service in which nursing plays an appropriate role. To that end, the project staff, work groups, and consultants will help nursing reach consensus on the following:

1. The common body of knowledge and skills essential for basic nursing practice, the curriculum content that supports it, and the credentialing process that reinforces it.

2. The testing, refinement, and advancement of the knowledge base on which improved education and practice rests.

3. The identification of the appropriate management of nursing resources to achieve nursing's goals.

Each of these objectives will involve a major area of investigation: nursing education, nursing research, and nursing management. The work will be accomplished by three major work groups, one in each of the areas. A staff member will be assigned to each work group.

Seeking consensus among nurses is not an easy task, but must be accomplished if nursing is to assume its rightful place in health care. We believe the implementation of the major findings of the major studies on nursing during the past few decades is long overdue and applaud the W.K. Kellogg Foundation for their support for nursing and the people nurses serve.

10.3928/0148-4834-19850101-01

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