Journal of Gerontological Nursing

AGS Update 

Updated and Expanded: AGS’ Geriatric Nursing Review Syllabus

Wayne C. McCormick, MD, MPH, AGSF

Abstract

The author has disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise.

The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) develops a range of publications to ensure that current, evidence-based geriatrics information is available to all health care practitioners who care for older adults, as well as those who teach the care of older adults to health professional trainees. The Geriatric Nursing Review Syllabus (GNRS), tailored to advanced practice nurses (APNs), is among AGS’ most important publications. First published in 2003, the new 4th edition of GNRS (GNRS-4) was updated earlier this year.

“We’re very pleased to debut the new GNRS-4, which is a key resource for APNs and advanced practice nursing students working with older adults,” says Ellen Flaherty, PhD, APRN, AGSF, who co-edited the new edition with Barbara Resnick, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, FAANP, AGSF. “Given the essential role nurses play in caring for the rapidly growing number of older adults, it’s an essential resource for those in the field.”

Among other things, the GNRS-4 includes 64 concise, up-to-date chapters written by a team of more than 150 interdisciplinary experts in geriatrics. The syllabus also includes 125 new case-oriented, multiple choice questions with accompanying answers. Similar to previous versions, the GNRS-4 provides questions drawn from the entire knowledge base of geriatrics.

The comprehensive content of the GNRS-4 provides faculty, students, and practitioners with information regarding diagnosis, treatment, and management. Available in both hardcopy and online, the syllabus is used in classrooms nationwide and is designed to facilitate self-study.

Many teaching staff also use the GNRS teaching slides, which complement other sources. The slides are available by chapter; they can be used as stand-alone lectures, or they can be modified for specific audiences and presentations.

Faculty and students have also found other ways to use the GNRS-4. For example, students use it in informal study groups, and faculty have used the syllabus in various settings.

“Ours is an adult and geriatric program, and we’ve found that it’s hard finding a single text that covers it all,” says Margaret Hammersla, MS, RN, CRNP, Assistant Professor and Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner at the University of Maryland’s School of Nursing. “Because older people are unique, we use two student texts. One is a general primary care text, and the other is the GNRS. We also use a lot of guest lecturers, who share varied experiences and recommendations.”

“I have used the GNRS since 2008, and it has been a required text ever since,” says Evelyn G. Duffy, DNP, AGPCNP-BC, FAANP, Associate Professor and Director of the Adult-Gerontological Nurse Practitioner Program at the Case Western Reserve University Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. “For years I used it for my General Nurse Practitioner class, which was a group with a defined interest. Now, with the Adult-Gerontology curriculum, I have more students who aren’t as focused on or passionate about geriatrics. I find that sharing cases and linking them to the GNRS content is a way to help engage students in the care of older adults. I also use the GNRS questions as the foundation for my own question writing.”

At George Washington University’s Nursing School, Sandra Davis, PhD, DPM, CRNP-BC, Director of the Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner program, uses the GNRS-4 for curriculum mapping, among other things. Dr. Davis studies curriculum-related data, identifying core skills and content that students should be learning. With the university nursing program existing exclusively online, she and other faculty have found many helpful ways to further incorporate the syllabus into their curriculum, one of which is by using the school’s online discussion boards that students and faculty use to discuss…

The author has disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise.

The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) develops a range of publications to ensure that current, evidence-based geriatrics information is available to all health care practitioners who care for older adults, as well as those who teach the care of older adults to health professional trainees. The Geriatric Nursing Review Syllabus (GNRS), tailored to advanced practice nurses (APNs), is among AGS’ most important publications. First published in 2003, the new 4th edition of GNRS (GNRS-4) was updated earlier this year.

“We’re very pleased to debut the new GNRS-4, which is a key resource for APNs and advanced practice nursing students working with older adults,” says Ellen Flaherty, PhD, APRN, AGSF, who co-edited the new edition with Barbara Resnick, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, FAANP, AGSF. “Given the essential role nurses play in caring for the rapidly growing number of older adults, it’s an essential resource for those in the field.”

Among other things, the GNRS-4 includes 64 concise, up-to-date chapters written by a team of more than 150 interdisciplinary experts in geriatrics. The syllabus also includes 125 new case-oriented, multiple choice questions with accompanying answers. Similar to previous versions, the GNRS-4 provides questions drawn from the entire knowledge base of geriatrics.

The comprehensive content of the GNRS-4 provides faculty, students, and practitioners with information regarding diagnosis, treatment, and management. Available in both hardcopy and online, the syllabus is used in classrooms nationwide and is designed to facilitate self-study.

Many teaching staff also use the GNRS teaching slides, which complement other sources. The slides are available by chapter; they can be used as stand-alone lectures, or they can be modified for specific audiences and presentations.

Faculty and students have also found other ways to use the GNRS-4. For example, students use it in informal study groups, and faculty have used the syllabus in various settings.

“Ours is an adult and geriatric program, and we’ve found that it’s hard finding a single text that covers it all,” says Margaret Hammersla, MS, RN, CRNP, Assistant Professor and Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner at the University of Maryland’s School of Nursing. “Because older people are unique, we use two student texts. One is a general primary care text, and the other is the GNRS. We also use a lot of guest lecturers, who share varied experiences and recommendations.”

“I have used the GNRS since 2008, and it has been a required text ever since,” says Evelyn G. Duffy, DNP, AGPCNP-BC, FAANP, Associate Professor and Director of the Adult-Gerontological Nurse Practitioner Program at the Case Western Reserve University Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. “For years I used it for my General Nurse Practitioner class, which was a group with a defined interest. Now, with the Adult-Gerontology curriculum, I have more students who aren’t as focused on or passionate about geriatrics. I find that sharing cases and linking them to the GNRS content is a way to help engage students in the care of older adults. I also use the GNRS questions as the foundation for my own question writing.”

At George Washington University’s Nursing School, Sandra Davis, PhD, DPM, CRNP-BC, Director of the Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner program, uses the GNRS-4 for curriculum mapping, among other things. Dr. Davis studies curriculum-related data, identifying core skills and content that students should be learning. With the university nursing program existing exclusively online, she and other faculty have found many helpful ways to further incorporate the syllabus into their curriculum, one of which is by using the school’s online discussion boards that students and faculty use to discuss important aspects of the curriculum.

“We examine the GNRS key topics and concepts and look at areas where there are things students need to know more about, and we post them for discussion to enhance critical thinking and content application,” explains Laurie Dodge Wilson, MSN, RN, ANP/GNP-BC, AGPCNP, Program Faculty and Research Instructor at Washington University’s nursing school. In other innovations based on the program, the faculty also uses videos and case studies to test students’ grasp of the many elements of geriatric assessment after studying the GNRS.

Geriatric health care practitioners agree that whether the syllabus is discussed in the classroom, online, or in practitioners’ offices with patients, it plays an important role in the care of older adults.

“The GNRS-4 is based on evidence-based findings as available, and expert consensus on best practice in the care of older adults across multiple clinically challenging health problems,” says Donna Fick, PhD, RN, FGSA, FAAN, Distinguished Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing and Co-Director, The Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence, The Pennsylvania State University. “With its coverage of current research findings and management strategies, it is an invaluable resource for practitioners, faculty and students.”

The GNRS and GNRS teaching slides are also available for institutional licensing. For more information and pricing, visit http://www.GeriatricsCareOnline.org.

McCormick Wayne C., MD, MPH, AGSF

President

American Geriatrics Society

New York, New York

10.3928/00989134-20141015-04

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