Journal of Gerontological Nursing

Product News 

Product News

Abstract

The White House has unveiled a multi-agency plan aimed at reducing the epidemic of prescription drug abuse in the United States—including an education program backed by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that targets reducing the misuse and misprescribing of opioid agents. Key elements of the plan, titled “Epidemic: Responding to America’s Prescription Drug Abuse Crisis,” include:

In concert with the White House plan, the FDA is announcing a new risk reduction program—called a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS)—for all extended-release and long-acting opioid medications.

FDA experts say extended-release and long-acting opioid medications—including oxycodone (OxyContin®), morphine sulfate (Avinza®), methadone (Dolophine®), transdermal fentanyl (Duragesic®), and eight other brand names—are extensively misprescribed, misused, and abused, leading to overdoses, addiction, and deaths across the United States.

The new REMS plan focuses primarily on educating physicians about proper pain management, patient selection, and other requirements and improving patient awareness about how to use these drugs safely. As part of the plan, the FDA wants companies to give patients education materials, including a medication guide that uses consumer-friendly language to explain safe use and disposal.

The FDA wants drug makers to work together to develop a single system for implementing the REMS strategies. Toward that goal, FDA is now notifying opioid makers that they must propose a REMS plan within 120 days.

Physician training, patient counseling, and other risk reduction measures developed by opioid makers as part of the REMS are expected to become effective by early 2012. They will be required for various brand-name products known under the generic names:

Source.“FDA Acts to Reduce Harm from Opioid Drugs.” (2011, April 28). Retrieved April 28, 2011, from http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm251830.htm.

Health care facilities looking to cut down on lift-related injuries may be happy to have a bed that does all the hard work. Vital Go, Inc.’s new Total Lift Bed (TLB) is the industry’s first bed that can raise patients from a lying to fully standing position with no manual lifting. Models are available for hospitals, nursing homes/rehabilitation centers, and homes, as well as for bariatric populations. Via handset control, the TLB can bring patients to all possible positions: seated with legs down, seated with legs up, treatment position, and fully standing position with foot lifter parallel to floor.

The TLB’s motorized Foot Lifter, which moves in and out, allows positions that are not possible in any other bed. The Foot Lifter adjusts itself to the patient’s height and only then will allow the bed to start tilting. When reaching the appropriate angle, which will avoid body fraction, the Foot Lifter will start moving down toward the floor, bringing the patient safely to a standing position with feet on floor level, always keeping the patient’s center of gravity to the back.

The TLB also helps in early mobility as well as pulmonary therapy. For example, by continuously displaying the amount of pressure on the patient’s feet and legs, the TLB allows caregivers to raise patients incrementally, based on the patient’s ability to bear his or her own weight. More information about the TLB can be found at http://www.vitalgosys.com.

Source.(n.d.). Products. Retrieved from the VitalGo Systems website: http://vitalgosys.com/Products.aspx.

Strategy to Target Opioid Abuse Epidemic Unveiled

The White House has unveiled a multi-agency plan aimed at reducing the epidemic of prescription drug abuse in the United States—including an education program backed by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that targets reducing the misuse and misprescribing of opioid agents. Key elements of the plan, titled “Epidemic: Responding to America’s Prescription Drug Abuse Crisis,” include:

  • Expansion of state-based prescription drug monitoring programs.
  • Recommending convenient and environmentally responsible ways to remove unused medications from homes.
  • Supporting education for patients and health care providers.
  • Reducing the number of “pill mills” and doctor shopping through law enforcement.

In concert with the White House plan, the FDA is announcing a new risk reduction program—called a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS)—for all extended-release and long-acting opioid medications.

FDA experts say extended-release and long-acting opioid medications—including oxycodone (OxyContin®), morphine sulfate (Avinza®), methadone (Dolophine®), transdermal fentanyl (Duragesic®), and eight other brand names—are extensively misprescribed, misused, and abused, leading to overdoses, addiction, and deaths across the United States.

The new REMS plan focuses primarily on educating physicians about proper pain management, patient selection, and other requirements and improving patient awareness about how to use these drugs safely. As part of the plan, the FDA wants companies to give patients education materials, including a medication guide that uses consumer-friendly language to explain safe use and disposal.

The FDA wants drug makers to work together to develop a single system for implementing the REMS strategies. Toward that goal, FDA is now notifying opioid makers that they must propose a REMS plan within 120 days.

Physician training, patient counseling, and other risk reduction measures developed by opioid makers as part of the REMS are expected to become effective by early 2012. They will be required for various brand-name products known under the generic names:

  • Hydromorphone (e.g., Dilaudid®, Exalgo®).
  • Oxycodone (e.g., Percocet®).
  • Morphine.
  • Oxymorphone (Opana®).
  • Methadone.
  • Transdermal fentanyl.
  • Transdermal buprenorphine (Buprenex®).

Source.“FDA Acts to Reduce Harm from Opioid Drugs.” (2011, April 28). Retrieved April 28, 2011, from http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm251830.htm.

Bed Raises Patients from Lying to Standing

Health care facilities looking to cut down on lift-related injuries may be happy to have a bed that does all the hard work. Vital Go, Inc.’s new Total Lift Bed (TLB) is the industry’s first bed that can raise patients from a lying to fully standing position with no manual lifting. Models are available for hospitals, nursing homes/rehabilitation centers, and homes, as well as for bariatric populations. Via handset control, the TLB can bring patients to all possible positions: seated with legs down, seated with legs up, treatment position, and fully standing position with foot lifter parallel to floor.

The TLB’s motorized Foot Lifter, which moves in and out, allows positions that are not possible in any other bed. The Foot Lifter adjusts itself to the patient’s height and only then will allow the bed to start tilting. When reaching the appropriate angle, which will avoid body fraction, the Foot Lifter will start moving down toward the floor, bringing the patient safely to a standing position with feet on floor level, always keeping the patient’s center of gravity to the back.

The TLB also helps in early mobility as well as pulmonary therapy. For example, by continuously displaying the amount of pressure on the patient’s feet and legs, the TLB allows caregivers to raise patients incrementally, based on the patient’s ability to bear his or her own weight. More information about the TLB can be found at http://www.vitalgosys.com.

Source.(n.d.). Products. Retrieved from the VitalGo Systems website: http://vitalgosys.com/Products.aspx.

10.3928/00989134-20110428-01

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