Journal of Gerontological Nursing

News 

News

Abstract

In an update to its 2002 recommendation, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) now recommends that all women age 65 and older be routinely screened for osteoporosis. This is the first final recommendation statement to be published since the USPSTF implemented a new process in July 2010 in which all of its draft recommendation statements are posted for public comment on the USPSTF website prior to being issued in final form. The draft recommendation statement on screening for osteoporosis was posted for public comment from July 6 to August 3, 2010.

The USPSTF also recommends that younger women with increased risk factors for osteoporosis be screened if their fracture risk is equal to or greater than that of a 65-year-old White woman who has no additional risk factors. White women are used as the benchmark because they have a markedly higher rate of osteoporosis and fractures than other ethnic groups. Risk factors for osteoporosis include tobacco use, alcohol use, low body mass, and parental history of fractures.

The USPSTF did not indicate a specific age limit at which screening should no longer be offered because the risk for fractures continues to increase with age, and the evidence indicates that benefits can be realized within 18 to 24 months after starting treatment. The USPSTF also looked at whether to recommend screening men for osteoporosis but found insufficient evidence to make a recommendation at this time. The USPSTF also noted there is a lack of evidence about how often screening should be repeated in women whose first test is negative.

In postmenopausal women who have no prior fractures caused by osteoporosis, the USPSTF found convincing evidence that drug therapies (i.e., bisphosphonates, parathyroid hormone, raloxifene, and estrogen) reduce the risk for osteoporosis-related fractures.

The final recommendation and supporting documents are available at http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/uspsoste.htm.

Source.“Routine Osteoporosis Screening Recommended for All Women Over Age 65.” (2011, January 17). Retrieved January 24, 2011 from http://www.ahrq.gov/news/press/pr2011/tfosteopr.htm.

After having been passed unanimously in both the Senate and House of Representatives, the National Alzheimer’s Project Act (NAPA) was signed into law by President Barack Obama in January. Once enacted, NAPA will create a coordinated national plan to overcome the Alzheimer’s disease crisis and will ensure the coordination and evaluation of all national efforts in Alzheimer’s research, clinical care, institutional, and home- and community-based programs and their outcomes.

Objectives of NAPA include:

The United States now joins Australia, South Korea, Norway, France, England, Scotland, India, Malta, Cyprus, and Wales as countries that already have or are developing a national Alzheimer’s disease plan.

Source.Alzheimer’s Association. (2011). National Alzheimer’s Project Act (NAPA). Retrieved from http://www.kintera.org/site/pp.asp?c=mmKXLbP8E&b=5829219.

New Osteoporosis Guidelines Released

In an update to its 2002 recommendation, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) now recommends that all women age 65 and older be routinely screened for osteoporosis. This is the first final recommendation statement to be published since the USPSTF implemented a new process in July 2010 in which all of its draft recommendation statements are posted for public comment on the USPSTF website prior to being issued in final form. The draft recommendation statement on screening for osteoporosis was posted for public comment from July 6 to August 3, 2010.

The USPSTF also recommends that younger women with increased risk factors for osteoporosis be screened if their fracture risk is equal to or greater than that of a 65-year-old White woman who has no additional risk factors. White women are used as the benchmark because they have a markedly higher rate of osteoporosis and fractures than other ethnic groups. Risk factors for osteoporosis include tobacco use, alcohol use, low body mass, and parental history of fractures.

The USPSTF did not indicate a specific age limit at which screening should no longer be offered because the risk for fractures continues to increase with age, and the evidence indicates that benefits can be realized within 18 to 24 months after starting treatment. The USPSTF also looked at whether to recommend screening men for osteoporosis but found insufficient evidence to make a recommendation at this time. The USPSTF also noted there is a lack of evidence about how often screening should be repeated in women whose first test is negative.

In postmenopausal women who have no prior fractures caused by osteoporosis, the USPSTF found convincing evidence that drug therapies (i.e., bisphosphonates, parathyroid hormone, raloxifene, and estrogen) reduce the risk for osteoporosis-related fractures.

The final recommendation and supporting documents are available at http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/uspsoste.htm.

Source.“Routine Osteoporosis Screening Recommended for All Women Over Age 65.” (2011, January 17). Retrieved January 24, 2011 from http://www.ahrq.gov/news/press/pr2011/tfosteopr.htm.

National Alzheimer’s Plan Signed into Law

After having been passed unanimously in both the Senate and House of Representatives, the National Alzheimer’s Project Act (NAPA) was signed into law by President Barack Obama in January. Once enacted, NAPA will create a coordinated national plan to overcome the Alzheimer’s disease crisis and will ensure the coordination and evaluation of all national efforts in Alzheimer’s research, clinical care, institutional, and home- and community-based programs and their outcomes.

Objectives of NAPA include:

  • Launch a campaign within the federal government to overcome Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Create a National Alzheimer’s Disease Plan.
  • Update and report the National Plan to Congress annually.
  • Establish an interagency Advisory Council that will coordinate and evaluate all federal efforts on Alzheimer’s research, care, institutional services, and home- and community-based programs.
  • Accelerate the development of treatments that would prevent, halt, or reverse the course of Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Ensure the inclusion of racial populations at higher risk for developing the disease.

The United States now joins Australia, South Korea, Norway, France, England, Scotland, India, Malta, Cyprus, and Wales as countries that already have or are developing a national Alzheimer’s disease plan.

Source.Alzheimer’s Association. (2011). National Alzheimer’s Project Act (NAPA). Retrieved from http://www.kintera.org/site/pp.asp?c=mmKXLbP8E&b=5829219.

10.3928/00989134-20110208-99

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