Journal of Gerontological Nursing

Foundation News 

Foundation News

Abstract

The Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International’s (STTI) Center for Nursing Excellence in Long-Term Care, funded by a grant from sanofi-aventis U.S., is developing an evidence-based knowledge assessment and online educational program to focus on diabetes care in older adults. It will be customized and targeted to the needs of nurses working in long-term care facilities.

The 36-hour (continuing nursing education credits) course will include topics such as:

STTI’s Center for Nursing Excellence in Long-Term Care, in collaboration with experts from the Hartford Centers of Geriatric Nursing Excellence, skilled nursing facilities, national providers, trade associations, and geriatric consumer groups, is developing a portfolio of products and services to fulfill its mission to transform the role of the RN in the long-term care environment. For more information and resources, visit http://www.centerfornursingexcellence.org.

The Geriatric Nursing Leadership Academy (GNLA) is now well under way. Participants have already completed the first of two leadership workshops and have begun work on their projects, which serve as a platform for enacting leadership competency and skill developed throughout the 18-month mentored leadership academy.

The participants are working on a diverse range of projects, each with the ultimate goal of improving the quality of health care for older adults and their families through geriatric nursing practice. Throughout the project development process, the fellows will receive assistance from their mentor and a member of the GNLA faculty. During the next few months, the fellows will participate in a site visit with their GNLA faculty consultant and attend the academy’s second workshop in February 2011 in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Through the partnership between STTI and The John A. Hartford Foundation, GNLA has become the premier leadership development opportunity for nurses dedicated to influencing policy and geriatric health outcomes. This growing group of experts has begun a collective movement toward national influence in changing care for older adults.

The mission of the Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International is to support the learning, knowledge, and professional development of nurses committed to making a difference in health worldwide. Membership is by invitation to baccalaureate and graduate nursing students who demonstrate excellence in scholarship, and to nurse leaders exhibiting exceptional achievements in nursing. STTI has more than 130,000 active members. Learn more about STTI at http://www.nursingsociety.org.

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) has released the Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (NP) Competencies and Adult-Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) Competencies. Funded by The John A. Hartford Foundation, these national consensus-based documents were developed in collaboration with the Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing at New York University College of Nursing, the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF), and the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists. To access these competencies, visit http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Education/adultgerocomp.htm.

These publications delineate the entry-level competencies for graduates of master’s, doctoral, and postgraduate programs preparing NPs and CNSs who serve the adult-gerontology population. The competencies are intended to be used in conjunction with the core competencies outlined in the Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice and the Essentials of Master’s Education for Advanced Practice Nursing developed by the AACN. In addition, these documents build on the NONPF (2006) core competencies for all NPs and the National CNS Core Competencies (2008). This initiative is the first step in implementing the transition of NP and CNS education to encompass the entire spectrum of adult and gerontology practice as outlined in the “Consensus Model for APRN Regulation.” To review this model, see http://www.aacn.nche.edu/education/pdf/APRNReport.pdf.

The Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing and the AACN, both John A. Hartford Foundation grantees, have several new resources available for nursing faculty. For clinical nursing…

The Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International

Development of Nursing Resources on Diabetes Care in Older Adults

The Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International’s (STTI) Center for Nursing Excellence in Long-Term Care, funded by a grant from sanofi-aventis U.S., is developing an evidence-based knowledge assessment and online educational program to focus on diabetes care in older adults. It will be customized and targeted to the needs of nurses working in long-term care facilities.

The 36-hour (continuing nursing education credits) course will include topics such as:

  • Risk factors affecting the health of older adults with diabetes.
  • Age-related changes that affect glucose metabolism.
  • Appropriate indicators for assessing glycemic control.
  • Effective nursing interventions, including nutrition and exercise.
  • Polypharmacy issues in older adults related to diabetes and nondiabetes medications.

STTI’s Center for Nursing Excellence in Long-Term Care, in collaboration with experts from the Hartford Centers of Geriatric Nursing Excellence, skilled nursing facilities, national providers, trade associations, and geriatric consumer groups, is developing a portfolio of products and services to fulfill its mission to transform the role of the RN in the long-term care environment. For more information and resources, visit http://www.centerfornursingexcellence.org.

Geriatric Nursing Leadership Academy Fellows Begin Projects

The Geriatric Nursing Leadership Academy (GNLA) is now well under way. Participants have already completed the first of two leadership workshops and have begun work on their projects, which serve as a platform for enacting leadership competency and skill developed throughout the 18-month mentored leadership academy.

The participants are working on a diverse range of projects, each with the ultimate goal of improving the quality of health care for older adults and their families through geriatric nursing practice. Throughout the project development process, the fellows will receive assistance from their mentor and a member of the GNLA faculty. During the next few months, the fellows will participate in a site visit with their GNLA faculty consultant and attend the academy’s second workshop in February 2011 in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Through the partnership between STTI and The John A. Hartford Foundation, GNLA has become the premier leadership development opportunity for nurses dedicated to influencing policy and geriatric health outcomes. This growing group of experts has begun a collective movement toward national influence in changing care for older adults.

About the Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International

The mission of the Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International is to support the learning, knowledge, and professional development of nurses committed to making a difference in health worldwide. Membership is by invitation to baccalaureate and graduate nursing students who demonstrate excellence in scholarship, and to nurse leaders exhibiting exceptional achievements in nursing. STTI has more than 130,000 active members. Learn more about STTI at http://www.nursingsociety.org.

The John A. Hartford Foundation

New Adult-Gerontology NP & CNS Competencies Released

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) has released the Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (NP) Competencies and Adult-Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) Competencies. Funded by The John A. Hartford Foundation, these national consensus-based documents were developed in collaboration with the Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing at New York University College of Nursing, the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF), and the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists. To access these competencies, visit http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Education/adultgerocomp.htm.

These publications delineate the entry-level competencies for graduates of master’s, doctoral, and postgraduate programs preparing NPs and CNSs who serve the adult-gerontology population. The competencies are intended to be used in conjunction with the core competencies outlined in the Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice and the Essentials of Master’s Education for Advanced Practice Nursing developed by the AACN. In addition, these documents build on the NONPF (2006) core competencies for all NPs and the National CNS Core Competencies (2008). This initiative is the first step in implementing the transition of NP and CNS education to encompass the entire spectrum of adult and gerontology practice as outlined in the “Consensus Model for APRN Regulation.” To review this model, see http://www.aacn.nche.edu/education/pdf/APRNReport.pdf.

Resources for Nursing Faculty

The Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing and the AACN, both John A. Hartford Foundation grantees, have several new resources available for nursing faculty. For clinical nursing faculty, two web-based modules are available to assist faculty who are teaching undergraduate nursing students in hospitals to integrate care of older adults. Using a case study design with an “evolving case progression,” the modules take a faculty member through a typical clinical day on a medical-surgical unit, with tips on how to integrate content on assessment and dementia into the clinical assignment, the preconference, bedside teaching, postconference, charting, and clinical evaluation. To access these modules, see http://hartfordign.org/education/Baccalaureate_education.

Another resource is a series of six web-based modules to help nursing faculty maximize their use of nursing homes as clinical training sites, with a special focus on nursing homes involved in resident-directed care and culture change. These modules will also be available on the Hartford Institute website: http://hartfordign.org/education/Baccalaureate_education.

About the Foundation

The John A. Hartford Foundation is at the forefront of pioneering advances in medicine and health care, funding research, and programs that have revolutionized medicine and shaped the delivery of health care during the past 75 years. The Foundation’s overall goal is to increase the nation’s capacity to provide affordable care to its rapidly increasing older population.

For additional information about the John A. Hartford Foundation, including grant announcements, program information, quarterly newsletters, annual reports, staff contact information, and grant guidelines, access the Foundation’s website at http://www.jhartfound.org. Readers can also follow the Foundation via its “health AGEnda” blog ( http://www.jhartfound.org/blog) and Facebook ( http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-John-A-Hartford-Foundation/108070747107?ref=ts).

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the Northwest Health Foundation (NWHF) have announced nine new grants as part of Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN), a unique national initiative to help find innovative ways to create an adequate nursing workforce appropriate in size and equipped with the specific skills necessary to meet the changing demands of the 21st century patient population. The program provides support to local and regional philanthropies to act as catalysts in their own communities and to develop strategies for creating and sustaining a viable nursing workforce.

This marks the fifth year of PIN funding. The program invested more than $12 million in local partnerships. The 2010 partners will focus on key areas of concern in building a nursing workforce, including education, capacity, recruitment and retention, and diversity, leveraging more than $9 million in local and regional funding. During the program’s first 4 years, 88 foundation partners in 32 states and the island territories of the Western Pacific established more than 300 local partnerships among nursing organizations, funders, and workforce development boards to address the nursing and nurse faculty shortages. The new grantees will bring the total number of private philanthropic organizations contributing to the solutions to nearly 100 and expands the number of states represented to 37.

Through PIN, RWJF and NWHF are discovering successful models that can be replicated across the country. Nationwide, the projects represent a diverse group planning a wide range of program initiatives. Grant recipients are:

  • Bingham Program (Maine). Maine Partners in Education and Practice will redesign nursing education to create appropriate nursing professionals to meet the needs of the people of Maine, with a specific focus on long-term care and home care serving urban and rural seniors.
  • Caring for Colorado Foundation. Care and Career Transitions: Innovations in Home Healthcare, the Missing Link will develop new ways to increase the number and competencies of nurses providing home health care in Colorado.
  • Community Foundation of SE Michigan. Nurse Leadership Development in Southeast Michigan will address nursing workforce retention issues at acute and long-term care institutions in southeastern Michigan through a leadership development program.
  • Dakota Medical Foundation (North Dakota). North Dakota Partners in Nursing Gerontology Consortium Project will change the image of nurses across the state, focusing on the variety of practice settings and leading to an increase in American Indian and Latino high school students’ interest in the profession.
  • Endowment for Health (New Hampshire). The New Hampshire Nursing Diversity Pipeline Project will expand ethnic and racial diversity of the nursing workforce and nursing education faculty by increasing awareness of the nursing profession among minority youth, strengthening academic preparedness for nursing education, and increasing the number of nurses from underrepresented populations who attain an advanced degree and commit to teach in nursing education in New Hampshire.
  • Humboldt Area Foundation (California). Humboldt Bay Regional Simulation Center will consolidate local nursing and health care expertise on the use of high-fidelity simulation as a tool to educate new nurses and upgrade the skills of practicing nurses.
  • Texoma Health Foundation (Texas). Texoma Nursing Advancement and Leadership Project will create a virtual regional network in north Texas and south central Oklahoma focused on increasing capacity of the current nursing workforce in all health care settings through career building, educational advancement, and leadership development.
  • The Cleveland Foundation (Ohio). Expanding the Number of Non-Traditional Nurse Educators through Online Education will increase educational capacity in Ohio schools of nursing by training nontraditional instructors to deliver high-quality online education to graduate and undergraduate nursing students.
  • The Horizon Foundation for New Jersey. Nursing Academic Resource Center of New Jersey online program will be launched to assist first-year graduate nurses to succeed in their pursuit of an MSN degree.

About the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation ( http://www.rwjf.org) focuses on the pressing health and health care issues facing our country. As the nation’s largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to improving the health and health care of all Americans, the Foundation works with a diverse group of organizations and individuals to identify solutions and achieve comprehensive, meaningful and timely change. For more than 35 years the Foundation has brought experience, commitment, and a rigorous, balanced approach to the problems that affect the health and health care of those it serves.

About the Northwest Health Foundation

Founded in 1997, the Northwest Health Foundation is a nonprofit foundation that seeks to advance, support, and promote the health of the people of Oregon and southwest Washington. The Foundation achieves its mission through a variety of means, including grantmaking, technical assistance and training, convening, commissioning research, and supporting policy advocacy.

10.3928/00989134-20101101-05

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