Journal of Gerontological Nursing

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News

Abstract

The Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing at New York University College of Nursing, in collaboration with the Coalition for Geriatric Nursing Organizations and the Pioneer Network, has published an issue paper, Nurses’ Involvement in Nursing Home Culture Change: Overcoming Barriers, Advancing Opportunities (available from http://hartfordign.org/policy/position_papers_briefs/). The paper, addressed to nursing homes and professional RNs practicing in nursing homes, discusses the move toward culture change—a movement away from institution-driven models of care toward more consumer-driven models that embrace flexibility and patient self-determination.

The issue paper grew out of an October 2008 meeting of an interdisciplinary expert panel of leaders in culture change and in gerontological nursing. The paper summarizes the panel discussion and frames the competencies that need to be developed for nurses involved in culture change and resident-directed care. Recommendations are provided for nursing homes regarding practicing nurses and for academic programs preparing professional nurses. For example, the paper recommends that nursing homes develop and distribute a statement of goals for practicing nurses in culture change nursing homes. In addition, it is recommended that academic nursing programs conduct comprehensive reviews of culture change content in prelicensure (diploma, associate degree, and baccalaureate) nursing programs.

Source.Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing. (2009, June 11). New issue paper describes the role of nurses in nursing home ‘culture change’ [Press release]. New York: Author.

© National Senior Games Association

The largest multi-sport event in the world for men and women athletes age 50 and older will take place in the San Francisco Bay area from August 1 to 15, 2009. The 2009 Summer National Senior Games is a product of the National Senior Games Association, a national not-for-profit organization promoting healthy lifestyles for older adults through education, fitness, and sport.

The first Games were held in 1987 in St. Louis and featured 2,500 athletes; this year’s event is expected to include 12,750 athletes competing in more than 800 events. Medal sports include archery, badminton, basketball, bowling, cycling, golf, horseshoes, race walk, racquetball, road race, shuffleboard, softball, swimming, table tennis, tennis, track and field, triathlon, and volleyball. Demonstration sports for 2009 include equestrian, fencing, lawn bowling, rowing, sailing, soccer and water polo.

The Games are held every other year. The Games will take place in Houston and Cleveland in 2011 and 2013, respectively; athlete qualifying information for these events can be accessed from http://www.nsga.com. More information about the 2009 Games can be found at http://www.2009seniorgames.org.

Source.“2009 Summer National Senior Games: Fast Facts.” (n.d.). Retrieved July 7, 2009, from http://www.2009seniorgames.org/pdf/09_FastFacts.pdf.

Dementia Care Professionals of America (DCPA), a division of the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA), is now accepting nominations for its third annual Dementia Care Professional of the Year award. The award honors an individual who has demonstrated professional excellence in care, compassionate performance that exceeds expectations, and a dedicated commitment to people diagnosed with dementia.

The deadline for applications for the 2009 Dementia Care Professional of the Year award is September 1, 2009. The professional can be nominated by peers, colleagues, employers, clients, or clients’ families. Nominees do not need to be affiliated with DCPA or AFA. For more information and an application, visit http://www.careprofessionals.org.

Source.“National Group Seeks Nominations for ‘Dementia Care Professional of the Year.’” (2009, June 10). Retrieved July 7, 2009, from http://www.alzfdn.org/MediaCenter/2009-06-09.html.

A new Web site providing access to a nationwide database of elder care providers is now available for families and caregivers. Free to both providers and consumers, CareMinds ( http://www.careminds.com) features:

Source.“New www.CareMinds.com Helps Elder Care Providers to Connect with Families and Caregivers via Free Listings, Leads and Content Sharing.” (2009, June 2). Retrieved July 7, 2009, from http://www.prweb.com/releases/2009/06/prweb2491004.htm.

A new…

Resident-Centered Care Highlighted in Issue Paper

The Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing at New York University College of Nursing, in collaboration with the Coalition for Geriatric Nursing Organizations and the Pioneer Network, has published an issue paper, Nurses’ Involvement in Nursing Home Culture Change: Overcoming Barriers, Advancing Opportunities (available from http://hartfordign.org/policy/position_papers_briefs/). The paper, addressed to nursing homes and professional RNs practicing in nursing homes, discusses the move toward culture change—a movement away from institution-driven models of care toward more consumer-driven models that embrace flexibility and patient self-determination.

The issue paper grew out of an October 2008 meeting of an interdisciplinary expert panel of leaders in culture change and in gerontological nursing. The paper summarizes the panel discussion and frames the competencies that need to be developed for nurses involved in culture change and resident-directed care. Recommendations are provided for nursing homes regarding practicing nurses and for academic programs preparing professional nurses. For example, the paper recommends that nursing homes develop and distribute a statement of goals for practicing nurses in culture change nursing homes. In addition, it is recommended that academic nursing programs conduct comprehensive reviews of culture change content in prelicensure (diploma, associate degree, and baccalaureate) nursing programs.

Source.Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing. (2009, June 11). New issue paper describes the role of nurses in nursing home ‘culture change’ [Press release]. New York: Author.

Athletes Ages 50 to 100+ Convene in San Francisco for Summer National Senior Games

© National Senior Games Association

© National Senior Games Association

The largest multi-sport event in the world for men and women athletes age 50 and older will take place in the San Francisco Bay area from August 1 to 15, 2009. The 2009 Summer National Senior Games is a product of the National Senior Games Association, a national not-for-profit organization promoting healthy lifestyles for older adults through education, fitness, and sport.

The first Games were held in 1987 in St. Louis and featured 2,500 athletes; this year’s event is expected to include 12,750 athletes competing in more than 800 events. Medal sports include archery, badminton, basketball, bowling, cycling, golf, horseshoes, race walk, racquetball, road race, shuffleboard, softball, swimming, table tennis, tennis, track and field, triathlon, and volleyball. Demonstration sports for 2009 include equestrian, fencing, lawn bowling, rowing, sailing, soccer and water polo.

The Games are held every other year. The Games will take place in Houston and Cleveland in 2011 and 2013, respectively; athlete qualifying information for these events can be accessed from http://www.nsga.com. More information about the 2009 Games can be found at http://www.2009seniorgames.org.

Source.“2009 Summer National Senior Games: Fast Facts.” (n.d.). Retrieved July 7, 2009, from http://www.2009seniorgames.org/pdf/09_FastFacts.pdf.

Nominations for Dementia Care Award Due Sep. 1

Dementia Care Professionals of America (DCPA), a division of the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA), is now accepting nominations for its third annual Dementia Care Professional of the Year award. The award honors an individual who has demonstrated professional excellence in care, compassionate performance that exceeds expectations, and a dedicated commitment to people diagnosed with dementia.

The deadline for applications for the 2009 Dementia Care Professional of the Year award is September 1, 2009. The professional can be nominated by peers, colleagues, employers, clients, or clients’ families. Nominees do not need to be affiliated with DCPA or AFA. For more information and an application, visit http://www.careprofessionals.org.

Source.“National Group Seeks Nominations for ‘Dementia Care Professional of the Year.’” (2009, June 10). Retrieved July 7, 2009, from http://www.alzfdn.org/MediaCenter/2009-06-09.html.

Free Elder Care Provider Listings and More at CareMinds.com

A new Web site providing access to a nationwide database of elder care providers is now available for families and caregivers. Free to both providers and consumers, CareMinds ( http://www.careminds.com) features:

  • A comprehensive, nationwide database of providers composed of approximately 60,000 assisted living and skilled nursing facilities, medical and nonmedical home care, hospice care, and geriatric care managers—searchable by category and geography.
  • The ability for providers to claim their listing and then benefit from this free membership by posting additional information/photos to their listing and responding to consumer reviews. If the provider is not in the existing database, it can add its listing easily.
  • Free leads and direct contacts from users seeking provider resources.
  • Industry-generated recommendations.
  • The ability to contribute bylined articles and other content relevant to elder care. All provided articles are categorized and searchable by keyword and will be deliverable via RSS feeds to other Web sites, including news and press release sites. Caregivers, families, and older adults may also post information and share their experiences. Articles can be submitted on the Web site or e-mailed to article@careminds.com.
  • Consolidation of relevant blogs and news into one Web site, creating a one-stop information source for elder care. Bloggers may e-mail their blog to blog@careminds.com for consideration.

Source.“New www.CareMinds.com Helps Elder Care Providers to Connect with Families and Caregivers via Free Listings, Leads and Content Sharing.” (2009, June 2). Retrieved July 7, 2009, from http://www.prweb.com/releases/2009/06/prweb2491004.htm.

Palliative Care Gets Global Attention

A new global action network designed to focus exclusively on hospice and palliative care development worldwide has launched. The Worldwide Palliative Care Alliance (WPCA) is an alliance of national and regional hospice and palliative care organizations, including the 34,000+ member National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization based in Alexandria, Virginia.

Only 15% of the world’s countries have hospice and palliative care that is integrated with general health care, a need the WPCA hopes to address. National hospice and palliative care organizations have been informally meeting every 2 years since 2003 to address this need, and this group has now formally become the WPCA. For more information about WPCA, visit http://www.helpthehospices.org.uk/wpca.

Source.“New International Alliance Launches to Address Urgent Needs of Palliative Care Patients Worldwide.” (2009, May 5). Retrieved July 7, 2009, from http://news.prnewswire.com/DisplayReleaseContent.aspx?ACCT=104&STORY=/www/story/05-05-2009/0005019481&EDATE=.

Professor Promotes Seated Tai Chi for Wheelchair Users

Although He Does not Use a Wheelchair for Mobility, Dr. Zibin Guo Used the Device to Demonstrate an Innovative Tai Chi Technique for a Group in China.Photo Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Photo. Although He Does not Use a Wheelchair for Mobility, Dr. Zibin Guo Used the Device to Demonstrate an Innovative Tai Chi Technique for a Group in China.Photo Courtesy of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Dr. Zibin Guo, a medical anthropologist in The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, in an effort to help individuals in wheelchairs improve their physical and mental health, has put a fresh spin on the ancient Chinese martial art of tai chi. Guo has adapted tai chi, a noncompetitive self-paced system of gentle physical exercise, for wheelchair-dependent individuals.

Guo’s holistic approach has been embraced in China, where he was invited by the Beijing 2008 Olympic Committee and the All China Federation for People with Disabilities to conduct a wheelchair demonstration for the International Paralympics Committee one day before the opening ceremony of the 2008 Paralympics in Beijing (Photo).

Guo also led a small study to explore the potential benefits of practicing a simple seated tai chi program for people with ambulatory disability resulting from health problems or injuries. Participants who qualified were unable to walk independently 50 feet or more with an assistive device in 1 minute or less. Six women and 4 men signed on for 2 months of free classes and met twice per week for 45-minute tai chi sessions.

Many of the participants reported improved stamina and said they enjoyed the social nature of the classes, including Mrs. B., a 70-year-old woman who had a stroke 7 years ago. Her left arm was partially paralyzed, and over the years, she fell twice. She was confined to a wheelchair for more than 2 years and unable to walk even a short distance. After the tai chi intervention, Mrs. B. began walking and treading stairs unassisted and began to regain use of her left arm.

Source.“Wheelchair Tai Chi—One of the Simplest Ways for People Who Use Wheelchairs to Improve Their Physical and Mental Health.” (2009, June 2). Retrieved July 7, 2009, from http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/152104.php.

10.3928/00989134-20090708-02

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