Journal of Gerontological Nursing

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Journal of Gerontological Nursing (JGN) editor Kathleen C. Buckwalter, RN, PhD, FAAN of the University of Iowa College of Nursing was honored with the prestigious Distinguished Mentorship in Gerontology Award in November at the Gerontological Society of America (GSA) meeting in National Harbor, Maryland.

Journal of Gerontological Nursing Editor Kathleen C. Buckwalter, Rn, Phd, Faan, Is Presented with the Gerontological Society of America’s Distinguished Mentorship in Gerontology Award by Meredith Flood, Phd, Aprn, Bc, Who Nominated Dr. Buckwalter for the Award.Photo courtesy of the Gerontological Society of America

The award is given to members of the GSA’s Behavioral and Social Sciences Section who have fostered excellence in—and had a major impact on the field—by virtue of their mentoring, and whose inspiration is sought by students and colleagues. The mentor must have had an influence on graduate, undergraduate, or professional students or junior colleagues, as evidenced by the number and accomplishments of his or her proteges. The nominee’s influence on the next generation of gerontologists also may be evident through training programs, research on and written materials associated with pedagogy (e.g., textbooks, articles), supervising research, or providing clinical training. JGN congratulates Dr. Buckwalter on her extraordinary achievements.

Journal of Gerontological Nursing (JGN) authors Nancy Benton, MN, RN, CNS; Theresa A. Harvath, PhD, RN, CNS; Marna Flaherty-Robb, MSN, RN, CNS; Marijo Medcraft, RN; Karen Mc-Whorter, MS, RN; Faith McClelland, RN, CWON; Carol Joseph, MD; and Floris Mambourg, MS, RN were selected as the 11th annual recipients of the Edna Stilwell Writing Award for their article, “Managing Chronic, Nonhealing Wounds Using a Research-Based Protocol,” published in the November 2007 issue of JGN (Vol. 33, No. 11, pp. 38–45). The article described a practice improvement project designed to improve the wound care management of homebound veterans with chronic, nonhealing lower extremity wounds using a research-based protocol and consultation by a certified wound care specialist.

Journal of Gerontological Nursing Editor Kathleen C. Buckwalter, Rn, Phd, Faan, Presents Theresa A. Harvath, Phd, Rn, Cns, with a Plaque for the Edna Stilwell Writing Award, Which Harvath Accepted on Behalf of the Winning Article’s Authors.Photo Credit: Slack Incorporated

The Award, which includes a plaque and a $500 cash prize, was established by SLACK Incorporated, publisher of JGN, in recognition of the contributions of Edna M. Stilwell, PhD, RN, C, as Editor of JGN from 1974 to 1997. The purpose of the Award is to continue Stilwell’s tradition of mentoring and recognizing authors in the field of gerontological nursing.

All authors published in JGN are eligible for this Award, given to the author or group of authors of the best article published each year. Entrants are nominated by Editorial Board and Review Panel members during blind peer review, and the winner is selected by a committee.

Dr. Harvath accepted the award in November at the Gerontological Society of America’s annual meeting in National Harbor, Maryland. JGN congratulates the authors on their outstanding contribution.

Ginkgo biloba (ginkgo), one of the most widely used herbal supplements for improving memory and cognition, was found to have no impact on the development of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, according to study findings published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The Ginkgo biloba for the Evaluation of Memory study was the largest clinical trial ever to evaluate the effects of the dietary supplement ginkgo on the occurrence of dementia. The study tested the effectiveness of 120 mg of ginkgo twice daily versus placebo in lowering the incidence of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in 3,069 participants age 75 and older who had either normal cognition or mild cognitive impairment. Study results showed that 240…

JGN Editor Takes Home Distinguished Honor

Journal of Gerontological Nursing (JGN) editor Kathleen C. Buckwalter, RN, PhD, FAAN of the University of Iowa College of Nursing was honored with the prestigious Distinguished Mentorship in Gerontology Award in November at the Gerontological Society of America (GSA) meeting in National Harbor, Maryland.

Journal of Gerontological Nursing Editor Kathleen C. Buckwalter, Rn, Phd, Faan, Is Presented with the Gerontological Society of America’s Distinguished Mentorship in Gerontology Award by Meredith Flood, Phd, Aprn, Bc, Who Nominated Dr. Buckwalter for the Award.Photo courtesy of the Gerontological Society of America

Journal of Gerontological Nursing Editor Kathleen C. Buckwalter, Rn, Phd, Faan, Is Presented with the Gerontological Society of America’s Distinguished Mentorship in Gerontology Award by Meredith Flood, Phd, Aprn, Bc, Who Nominated Dr. Buckwalter for the Award.Photo courtesy of the Gerontological Society of America

The award is given to members of the GSA’s Behavioral and Social Sciences Section who have fostered excellence in—and had a major impact on the field—by virtue of their mentoring, and whose inspiration is sought by students and colleagues. The mentor must have had an influence on graduate, undergraduate, or professional students or junior colleagues, as evidenced by the number and accomplishments of his or her proteges. The nominee’s influence on the next generation of gerontologists also may be evident through training programs, research on and written materials associated with pedagogy (e.g., textbooks, articles), supervising research, or providing clinical training. JGN congratulates Dr. Buckwalter on her extraordinary achievements.

Edna Stilwell Writing Award Presented at GSA

Journal of Gerontological Nursing (JGN) authors Nancy Benton, MN, RN, CNS; Theresa A. Harvath, PhD, RN, CNS; Marna Flaherty-Robb, MSN, RN, CNS; Marijo Medcraft, RN; Karen Mc-Whorter, MS, RN; Faith McClelland, RN, CWON; Carol Joseph, MD; and Floris Mambourg, MS, RN were selected as the 11th annual recipients of the Edna Stilwell Writing Award for their article, “Managing Chronic, Nonhealing Wounds Using a Research-Based Protocol,” published in the November 2007 issue of JGN (Vol. 33, No. 11, pp. 38–45). The article described a practice improvement project designed to improve the wound care management of homebound veterans with chronic, nonhealing lower extremity wounds using a research-based protocol and consultation by a certified wound care specialist.

Journal of Gerontological Nursing Editor Kathleen C. Buckwalter, Rn, Phd, Faan, Presents Theresa A. Harvath, Phd, Rn, Cns, with a Plaque for the Edna Stilwell Writing Award, Which Harvath Accepted on Behalf of the Winning Article’s Authors.Photo Credit: Slack Incorporated

Journal of Gerontological Nursing Editor Kathleen C. Buckwalter, Rn, Phd, Faan, Presents Theresa A. Harvath, Phd, Rn, Cns, with a Plaque for the Edna Stilwell Writing Award, Which Harvath Accepted on Behalf of the Winning Article’s Authors.Photo Credit: Slack Incorporated

The Award, which includes a plaque and a $500 cash prize, was established by SLACK Incorporated, publisher of JGN, in recognition of the contributions of Edna M. Stilwell, PhD, RN, C, as Editor of JGN from 1974 to 1997. The purpose of the Award is to continue Stilwell’s tradition of mentoring and recognizing authors in the field of gerontological nursing.

All authors published in JGN are eligible for this Award, given to the author or group of authors of the best article published each year. Entrants are nominated by Editorial Board and Review Panel members during blind peer review, and the winner is selected by a committee.

Dr. Harvath accepted the award in November at the Gerontological Society of America’s annual meeting in National Harbor, Maryland. JGN congratulates the authors on their outstanding contribution.

Well-Known Herb Shows Disappointing Results

Ginkgo biloba (ginkgo), one of the most widely used herbal supplements for improving memory and cognition, was found to have no impact on the development of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, according to study findings published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The Ginkgo biloba for the Evaluation of Memory study was the largest clinical trial ever to evaluate the effects of the dietary supplement ginkgo on the occurrence of dementia. The study tested the effectiveness of 120 mg of ginkgo twice daily versus placebo in lowering the incidence of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in 3,069 participants age 75 and older who had either normal cognition or mild cognitive impairment. Study results showed that 240 mg of ginkgo daily had no effect on the onset of dementia or development of Alzheimer’s disease.

Participants were randomized to receive twice-daily dosages of either 120 mg of ginkgo extract or placebo. The dosage of ginkgo was selected based on prior clinical study results that found 120 mg twice daily to be the most effective dosage. The gingko product used in the study was supplied by Schwabe Pharmaceuticals and is sold in the United States as Ginkgold Max, under the Nature’s Way label.

Patients were followed for an average of 6 years, with a maximum of slightly more than 7 years. During the study, 523 participants were diagnosed with dementia, 246 in the placebo group and 277 in the ginkgo group, leading researchers to declare that ginkgo showed no overall effect for reducing all types of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease.

Source.“Ginkgo Proves Ineffective in Preventing Dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease.” (2008, November 18). Retrieved November 25, 2008, from http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2008-11/wfub-gpi111808.php.

For the First Time, Nurse Wins Lifetime Achievement Honor

For the first time in its 34-year history, the FREDDIE Lifetime Achievement Award has been bestowed upon a nurse, Vernice Ferguson, RN, MA, FAAN, FRCN, former president of the Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International; the American Academy of Nursing; and the International Society of Nurses in Cancer Care; as well as a fellow at the Royal College of Nursing in the United Kingdom.

The International Health and Medical Media Awards, otherwise known as the FREDDIE Awards, are viewed as the “Oscars of health and medicine.” Ferguson, the recipient of eight honorary doctorates and two fellowships, has been in the nursing profession for 50 years. For most of her career, she has served as the chief nurse at two Veterans Administration medical centers and as the chief of the nursing department, Clinical Center, at the National Institutes of Health. For 12 years, Ferguson was the assistant chief medical director for nursing programs at the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Dr. Carol Romano, Assistant Surgeon General, Poses with Vernice Ferguson, Rn, Ma, Faan, Frcn, Winner of the 2008 Freddie Lifetime Achievement Award.Photo Courtesy of the Freddie Awards

Dr. Carol Romano, Assistant Surgeon General, Poses with Vernice Ferguson, Rn, Ma, Faan, Frcn, Winner of the 2008 Freddie Lifetime Achievement Award.Photo Courtesy of the Freddie Awards

Past FREDDIE Lifetime Achievement Award winners have included Bill and Melinda Gates, Christopher Reeve, Jerry Lewis, Mary Tyler Moore, Doctors Without Borders, AmeriCares, and the American Red Cross.

Source.“For First Time in History, FREDDIE Lifetime Achievement Award Bestowed Upon Nurse.” (2008, November 4). Retrieved November 25, 2008, from http://www.nursingsociety.org/Media/Pages/freddieaward.aspx.

Can IT Strategies Reduce Medication Errors?

The Center for Home Care Policy & Research, Visiting Nurse Service of New York is launching a new study to test state-of-the art, information technology (IT) strategies that will alert home care nurses to patients at high risk for medication management problems so they can take immediate action to prevent potentially serious harm from happening.

In “Improving Medication Management Practices and Care Transitions through Technology” (IMPACT), a randomized, controlled trial, researchers are testing innovative IT interventions designed to improve clinical practice. The intervention involves:

  • A sophisticated alert system to flag patients at risk and electronically notify nurses on mobile computers so possible danger can be averted.
  • An electronic decision support tool with specific practice recommendations to aid nurses in improving medication management for high-risk patients.

In one arm of the study, custom-tailored patient information will be delivered directly to the patients’ homes to complement the nurse intervention. This information will be made available in electronic, CD, or pamphlet formats, depending on the patient’s preference. The target population is chronically ill patients who are age 65 and older and take multiple medications and/or have complex medication regimens. The 3-year IMPACT study is funded by a $1.2 million grant from the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality.

Source.“Researchers Test Innovative ‘IT’ Interventions To Improve Patient Safety By Reducing Medication Problems At Home.” (2008, November 11). Retrieved November 25, 2008, from http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/129029.php.

Honor Society Adds New Nursing Awards

The Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International, has added three new honors to its International Awards for Nursing Excellence, bringing the total to 16. The new awards include:

  • The Helen Henry Excellence of Care Award, which honors nurses who demonstrate excellence in their bedside manner. The award was established by Bonnie Wesorick, RN, MSN, in memory of her mother, Helen Henry.
  • The Geriatric Nursing Leadership Award, supported by The John A. Hartford Foundation, will honor nurses who show outstanding leadership, vision, and service in the field of geriatric nursing. The recipient, who will receive a $2,000 stipend, will have demonstrated a concrete and substantial impact on the care of older adults.
  • The Practice/Academe Innovation Collaboration Award will recognize an institution or group that has shown a commitment to optimizing the way in which nursing practice and academe interact. The award recipient(s) will have advanced the profession of nursing in their community while also improving patient care.

Nominations for all of the 2009 International Awards for Nursing Excellence will be accepted through March 5. Complete submission information can be accessed from http://www.nursingsociety.org/Awards/international/Pages/InternationalAwardsforNursingExcellence.aspx.

Source.The Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International. (2008, November 1). The Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International, announces three new nursing awards [press release]. Indianapolis: Author.

Study Examines Tia Misdiagnosis

Researchers at Rush University Medical Center have identified three bedside clinical features that can help more accurately distinguish transient ischemic attacks (TIAs, or mini-strokes) from disorders that might mimic their symptoms, according to a study published in Cerebrovascular Diseases.

The investigators examined the records of 100 emergency department patients who had an initial diagnosis of TIA and were admitted for further evaluation. Only 40 (40%) of these cases turned out to be true TIAs.

The three clinical features that, together, correctly classified 79% of the cases included:

  • Speed of onset, the strongest indicator of a TIA. Symptoms that manifest within seconds, like lightning, are more likely to indicate a TIA.
  • Nonspecific symptoms. The researchers found that a TIA was unlikely if a patient reported non-specific symptoms, such as light-headedness, tightness in the chest, or stomach upset, along with the neurological dysfunction.
  • Patient history. A TIA was unlikely if the patient had a history of similar episodes where a TIA was ruled out.

Source.“Three Clinical Features Identified to Avoid Misdiagnosis of TIAs.” (2008, November 10). Retrieved November 25, 2008, from http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/546255/.

10.3928/00989134-20090101-06

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