Journal of Gerontological Nursing

Endnotes 

Lady in the Straw Hat

Kristina Ibitayo, MSN, RN

Abstract

Ms. Ibitayo is a PhD nursing student and Graduate Research Assistant, Center for Nursing Research, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas. She is also Editorial Assistant, Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing.

The author thanks Gloria Carr, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor at The University of Memphis, for sharing her wonderful story with her.

Address correspondence to Kristina Ibitayo, MSN, RN, 504 E. Melton Street, Longview, TX 75602; e-mail: kibitayo@uta.edu.

© 2008 iStock International Inc.

Last year, a fellow PhD nursing student told me about an interesting encounter of hers with an elderly lady. It was a fascinating story. I have related details of this encounter in the poem below because it was my belief that this lady could not have picked a better spot to get lost than in my friend’s backyard. Unknowingly, the lady chose the home of a nurse with exceptional compassion. Relating this story back to my friend is a way of acknowledging the depth of character she consistently displays, regardless of personal circumstance.

Lady in the straw hat,

Oh, lady! What’s your name?

I see you, indeed I do,

Even though you cannot remember

Your name or house number.

Lady in the straw hat,

Why did you choose my backyard

This dew-fringed morning?

Why lose yourself

Among lawn chairs and barbecue pits,

When it is you I really do see

Outside my kitchen window?

Lady, lady, come inside.

Let’s discover who you are, if we can.

Please, come inside.

Safe indoors, she still pulls

Her sweater tightly to her chest.

Cuddling her arms, she sweetly says,

My hat, it has hankies inside.

Lady in the straw hat,

I wondered, when I saw tissue paper

Wrapped around your hat crown.

Police and firemen are here,

But after a brief nap on the couch,

My lady has no desire to discover

Who she really is, more than just

My backyard drop-by visitor.

Oh, lady, lady, please remember!

I silently urge, for although the visit’s been

Sweet and exceedingly strange,

I’ve still a plane to catch,

A rendezvous with faculty.

In the public servants’ care,

With my son to oversee,

I bid goodbye to

The lady in the straw hat.…

Ms. Ibitayo is a PhD nursing student and Graduate Research Assistant, Center for Nursing Research, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas. She is also Editorial Assistant, Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing.

The author thanks Gloria Carr, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor at The University of Memphis, for sharing her wonderful story with her.

Address correspondence to Kristina Ibitayo, MSN, RN, 504 E. Melton Street, Longview, TX 75602; e-mail: kibitayo@uta.edu.

© 2008 iStock International Inc.

© 2008 iStock International Inc.

Last year, a fellow PhD nursing student told me about an interesting encounter of hers with an elderly lady. It was a fascinating story. I have related details of this encounter in the poem below because it was my belief that this lady could not have picked a better spot to get lost than in my friend’s backyard. Unknowingly, the lady chose the home of a nurse with exceptional compassion. Relating this story back to my friend is a way of acknowledging the depth of character she consistently displays, regardless of personal circumstance.

Lady in the straw hat,

Oh, lady! What’s your name?

I see you, indeed I do,

Even though you cannot remember

Your name or house number.

Lady in the straw hat,

Why did you choose my backyard

This dew-fringed morning?

Why lose yourself

Among lawn chairs and barbecue pits,

When it is you I really do see

Outside my kitchen window?

Lady, lady, come inside.

Let’s discover who you are, if we can.

Please, come inside.

Safe indoors, she still pulls

Her sweater tightly to her chest.

Cuddling her arms, she sweetly says,

My hat, it has hankies inside.

Lady in the straw hat,

I wondered, when I saw tissue paper

Wrapped around your hat crown.

Police and firemen are here,

But after a brief nap on the couch,

My lady has no desire to discover

Who she really is, more than just

My backyard drop-by visitor.

Oh, lady, lady, please remember!

I silently urge, for although the visit’s been

Sweet and exceedingly strange,

I’ve still a plane to catch,

A rendezvous with faculty.

In the public servants’ care,

With my son to oversee,

I bid goodbye to

The lady in the straw hat.

Authors

Ms. Ibitayo is a PhD nursing student and Graduate Research Assistant, Center for Nursing Research, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas. She is also Editorial Assistant, Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing.

Address correspondence to Kristina Ibitayo, MSN, RN, 504 E. Melton Street, Longview, TX 75602; e-mail: .kibitayo@uta.edu

10.3928/00989134-20080901-06

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