Journal of Gerontological Nursing

Media Reviews 

Communication: How to Communicate with Someone Who Has Aphasia

Carole-Lynne LeNavenec, RN, PhD

Abstract

Communication: How to Communicate with Someone Who Has Aphasia Marion Karpinski, RN; 2000; Medford, OR: Healing Arts Communication; 24-minute videotape; $89.95

"How to Communicate with Someone with Aphasia," which is Volume 2 of the Healing Arts Home Care Companion video collection, will be welcomed by nurses, other health care providers and families who desire (a) to enhance their understanding of the impact of aphasia (i.e., a disorder of speech and language which is primarily caused by a stroke or brain injury) for adult patients and their significant others, and (b) to develop skills that will help these two groups to effectively connect with each other and with other people, through use of numerous strategies and techniques developed by a communication expert and a speech language pathologist.

There are several features that make this videotape an outstanding learning resource for students, health care practitioners, farnilies and other lay people. These aspects include:

* Nurse-narrator's ability to present, in a clear and concise manner, the complex data about communication principles and the "lived experience" of those involved in this situation of loss.

* A light bulb analogy used by the speech language pathologist to convey the pathophysiology of aphasia.

* Theoretical framework provided by the communication specialist, who emphasizes the role of social interaction for promoting a sense of self.

* How this illness in one family member affects all the others in a circular manner, whereby "everyone's identity is at risk."

* Vignettes by family members who demonstrate the many strategies that can be used to enhance effective communication in ways that "maintain and foster a sense of connectedness with others," as opposed to only focusing on getting information across to one another.…

Communication: How to Communicate with Someone Who Has Aphasia Marion Karpinski, RN; 2000; Medford, OR: Healing Arts Communication; 24-minute videotape; $89.95

"How to Communicate with Someone with Aphasia," which is Volume 2 of the Healing Arts Home Care Companion video collection, will be welcomed by nurses, other health care providers and families who desire (a) to enhance their understanding of the impact of aphasia (i.e., a disorder of speech and language which is primarily caused by a stroke or brain injury) for adult patients and their significant others, and (b) to develop skills that will help these two groups to effectively connect with each other and with other people, through use of numerous strategies and techniques developed by a communication expert and a speech language pathologist.

There are several features that make this videotape an outstanding learning resource for students, health care practitioners, farnilies and other lay people. These aspects include:

* Nurse-narrator's ability to present, in a clear and concise manner, the complex data about communication principles and the "lived experience" of those involved in this situation of loss.

* A light bulb analogy used by the speech language pathologist to convey the pathophysiology of aphasia.

* Theoretical framework provided by the communication specialist, who emphasizes the role of social interaction for promoting a sense of self.

* How this illness in one family member affects all the others in a circular manner, whereby "everyone's identity is at risk."

* Vignettes by family members who demonstrate the many strategies that can be used to enhance effective communication in ways that "maintain and foster a sense of connectedness with others," as opposed to only focusing on getting information across to one another.

10.3928/0098-9134-20030401-12

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