Journal of Gerontological Nursing

Media Reviews 

NGNA Core Curriculum for Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurses

Virginia Burggraf, RN, C, DNS

Abstract

NGNA Core Curriculum for Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurses by AS. Luggen, S.S. Travis, & S.S. Meiner (Eds.); 1998; $49.95 (son cover); $99.95 (hard cover); Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage

Advanced practice nursing and the care of older adults comes of age with this text. Priscilla Ebersole in the foreword states:

It has been apparent long before the current emphasis on physician primary practice, that at least 80% of elders who see physicians have problems that can be managed very well by APNs.

This text makes no distinction between the Geriatric Nurse Practitioner and the Clinical Specialist. It is not meant to be a text on primary health care of the aged; however, it lends itself to certification in Geriatric Advanced Practice Nursing. The editors state in their preface that the focus was to provide an integrative approach within a review text for use by both Geriatric Nurse Practitioners and Clinical Specialists. The chapters (all 122) are very concise and specifically developed into 12 sections that address theoretical foundations, role delineation, practice, education, research, ethical dimensions, consultation, administration, health policy, and specific disease presentations. It is assumed that the individual has basic knowledge of gerontological nursing. The text is easy to read, can supplement other texts, should be used not only to develop curriculum concepts but also in graduate seminars to evoke discussion.

It could be argued that the chapters are too brief; however, the editors "fill in the gaps" with study questions and additional readings. These provide faculty in graduate schools an entre to facilitate further discussion and seminar participation. The text is paperback and contains 715 pages of concrete information.…

NGNA Core Curriculum for Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurses by AS. Luggen, S.S. Travis, & S.S. Meiner (Eds.); 1998; $49.95 (son cover); $99.95 (hard cover); Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage

Advanced practice nursing and the care of older adults comes of age with this text. Priscilla Ebersole in the foreword states:

It has been apparent long before the current emphasis on physician primary practice, that at least 80% of elders who see physicians have problems that can be managed very well by APNs.

This text makes no distinction between the Geriatric Nurse Practitioner and the Clinical Specialist. It is not meant to be a text on primary health care of the aged; however, it lends itself to certification in Geriatric Advanced Practice Nursing. The editors state in their preface that the focus was to provide an integrative approach within a review text for use by both Geriatric Nurse Practitioners and Clinical Specialists. The chapters (all 122) are very concise and specifically developed into 12 sections that address theoretical foundations, role delineation, practice, education, research, ethical dimensions, consultation, administration, health policy, and specific disease presentations. It is assumed that the individual has basic knowledge of gerontological nursing. The text is easy to read, can supplement other texts, should be used not only to develop curriculum concepts but also in graduate seminars to evoke discussion.

It could be argued that the chapters are too brief; however, the editors "fill in the gaps" with study questions and additional readings. These provide faculty in graduate schools an entre to facilitate further discussion and seminar participation. The text is paperback and contains 715 pages of concrete information.

10.3928/0098-9134-19990401-09

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