Journal of Gerontological Nursing

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Women and Alzheimer's Disease

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease affects nearly 4 million Americans and is one of the most common chronic diseases of older people. Because the risk of Alzheimer's disease increases with age, women - who have a longer life expectancy than men - are disproportionately affected. Women comprise 72% of Americans age 85 and older, and nearly half of this group has Alzheimer's disease.

Not only do more women have the disease, but they also provide the majority of care for individuals with the disease. Eighty percent of caregivers are women - usually the wife, daughter, or daughter-in-law of the person with Alzheimer's disease.

To help women better understand the disease and its implications, the Alzheimer's Association developed a brochure titled, "Women and Alzheimer's Disease." This brochure provides women with information including warning signs of the disease, treatment options, and caregiver tips.

A free copy of the brochure, as well as information about Alzheimer's disease, is available by calling the Alzheimer's Association at (800) 272-3900 or visiting the Web site at www.alz.org.…

Alzheimer's disease affects nearly 4 million Americans and is one of the most common chronic diseases of older people. Because the risk of Alzheimer's disease increases with age, women - who have a longer life expectancy than men - are disproportionately affected. Women comprise 72% of Americans age 85 and older, and nearly half of this group has Alzheimer's disease.

Not only do more women have the disease, but they also provide the majority of care for individuals with the disease. Eighty percent of caregivers are women - usually the wife, daughter, or daughter-in-law of the person with Alzheimer's disease.

To help women better understand the disease and its implications, the Alzheimer's Association developed a brochure titled, "Women and Alzheimer's Disease." This brochure provides women with information including warning signs of the disease, treatment options, and caregiver tips.

A free copy of the brochure, as well as information about Alzheimer's disease, is available by calling the Alzheimer's Association at (800) 272-3900 or visiting the Web site at www.alz.org.

10.3928/0098-9134-19990101-05

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