Journal of Gerontological Nursing

Book Reviews 

Head Over Heels

Joan Kramer, RN, MS, CS

Abstract

Head Over Heels by Elaine Gallagher, and Howard Brunt, Chicago, IL: Terra Nova Films, Inc. 14 minutes (videotape), 16 pages (booklet), $89.00

Head Over Heels is a 14-minute videotape on fall prevention designed for community-dwelling elderly people and/or their family members. It is a joint project of the University of Victoria School of Nursing (British Columbia) and CRD Community Health Services. Head Over Heels is lighthearted and amusing featuring upbeat background music, while providing useful, factual information.

The information provided includes how the body changes with age, as well as environmental hazards and how they can be reduced or eliminated. A 16-page booklet reviews the information presented in the videotape and presents myths related to fears of falling that are not included in the videotape. The booklet is easy to read with large type and bold headings, as well as black and white photos and illustrations.

The older adults in the videotape are physically active and portray a healthy attitude about the need to compensate for changes associated with aging. Some language and cultural differences (e.g., lawn bowling) are slighdy distracting. The videotape may be useful as a client/family education tool in day care centers and prior to discharge from a subacute or rehabilitation setting.…

Head Over Heels by Elaine Gallagher, and Howard Brunt, Chicago, IL: Terra Nova Films, Inc. 14 minutes (videotape), 16 pages (booklet), $89.00

Head Over Heels is a 14-minute videotape on fall prevention designed for community-dwelling elderly people and/or their family members. It is a joint project of the University of Victoria School of Nursing (British Columbia) and CRD Community Health Services. Head Over Heels is lighthearted and amusing featuring upbeat background music, while providing useful, factual information.

The information provided includes how the body changes with age, as well as environmental hazards and how they can be reduced or eliminated. A 16-page booklet reviews the information presented in the videotape and presents myths related to fears of falling that are not included in the videotape. The booklet is easy to read with large type and bold headings, as well as black and white photos and illustrations.

The older adults in the videotape are physically active and portray a healthy attitude about the need to compensate for changes associated with aging. Some language and cultural differences (e.g., lawn bowling) are slighdy distracting. The videotape may be useful as a client/family education tool in day care centers and prior to discharge from a subacute or rehabilitation setting.

10.3928/0098-9134-19980501-17

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